Rube Walberg

George Elvin Walberg (July 27, 1896 – October 27, 1978) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played from 1923 through 1937 for the New York Giants (1923), Philadelphia Athletics (1923–1933) and Boston Red Sox (1934–1937). Walberg batted and threw left-handed. He was born in Pine City, Minnesota.

In a 15-season career, Walberg posted a 155–141 record with 1085 strikeouts and a 4.16 ERA in 2644 innings, including 15 shutouts and 140 complete games.

A consistent and durable pitcher, Walberg averaged 16 wins for the Philadelphia Athletics of Connie Mack from 1926 to 1932, with career-highs of 20 wins in 1931 and 18 in 1929. He also had a 1–1 mark with a 1.93 ERA for the Athletics in five World Series appearances. A good-hitting pitcher, Walberg collected a .179 batting average with four home runs and 84 runs batted in. When Mack dismantled the Athletics in 1933, he was sent along with Lefty Grove and Max Bishop to the Boston Red Sox in exchange for two players and $150.000. He was a spot starter and reliever with Boston during three seasons and pitched his last game at the age of forty-one.

Walberg surrendered 17 home runs to Babe Ruth, more than did any other pitcher.

Walberg died in Tempe, Arizona at age 82. In 2002, he was inducted into the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame.

Rube Walberg
RubeWalbergGoudeycard
Goudey baseball card, 1933 Series, #183
Pitcher
Born: July 27, 1896
Pine City, Minnesota
Died: October 27, 1978 (aged 82)
Tempe, Arizona
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
April 29, 1923, for the New York Giants
Last MLB appearance
October 2, 1937, for the Boston Red Sox
MLB statistics
Win–loss record155-141
Earned run average4.16
Strikeouts1,085
Teams
Career highlights and awards

External links

1923 New York Giants season

The 1923 New York Giants season was the franchise's 41st season. The Giants won the National League pennant with a 95-58 record. The team went on to lose to the New York Yankees in the 1923 World Series, four games to two.

1923 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1923 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 6th in the American League with a record of 69 wins and 83 losses.

1924 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1924 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 5th in the American League with a record of 71 wins and 81 losses.

1925 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1925 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing second in the American League with a record of 88 wins and 64 losses.

1926 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1926 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing third in the American League with a record of 83 wins and 67 losses.

1927 New York Yankees season

The 1927 New York Yankees season was their 25th season. The team finished with a record of 110–44, winning their fifth pennant and finishing 19 games ahead of the Philadelphia Athletics and were tied for first or better for the whole season. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they swept the Pittsburgh Pirates. This Yankees team is known for their feared lineup, which was nicknamed "Murderers' Row". This team is widely considered to be the best baseball team in the history of MLB.

1928 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1928 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 2nd in the American League with a record of 98 wins and 55 losses. The team featured seven eventual Hall-of-Fame players: Ty Cobb, Mickey Cochrane, Eddie Collins, Jimmie Foxx, Lefty Grove, Al Simmons, and Tris Speaker.

1929 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1929 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 1st in the American League with a record of 104 wins and 46 losses. After finishing in second place to the New York Yankees in 1927 and 1928, the club won the 1929 pennant by a large 18-game margin. The club went on to win the World Series over the NL champion Chicago Cubs, four games to one.

1929 World Series

The 1929 World Series featured the Philadelphia Athletics and the Chicago Cubs. The Athletics beat the Cubs decisively in five games.

This was the Series of the famous "Mack Attack" (so called in honor of longtime A's owner-manager Connie Mack), in which the Athletics overcame an eight-run deficit by scoring 10 runs in the home half of the seventh in Game 4 (before two straight strikeouts by Pat Malone ended it) to snatch a 10–8 victory from the jaws of a defeat which would have evened the Series at two games apiece. The Cubs were further humiliated in the middle of that record rally when center fielder Hack Wilson lost Mule Haas's fly ball in the sun for a fluke three-run inside-the-park home run, bringing the A's to within a run at 8–7. It was the last occurrence of an inside-the-park home run in a World Series game until Game 1 of the 2015 World Series.

1930 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1930 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing first in the American League with a record of 102 wins and 52 losses. It was their second of three consecutive pennants. In the 1930 World Series, they defeated the St. Louis Cardinals in six games. This was the A's final World Series championship in Philadelphia. They would next win the World Series 42 years later, in 1972, after they had moved to Oakland.

When playing the Cleveland Indians on July 25, the Athletics became the only team in Major League history to execute a triple steal twice in one game.

1931 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1931 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing first in the American League with a record of 107 wins and 45 losses. It was the team's third consecutive pennant-winning season and its third consecutive season with over 100 wins. However the A's lost the 1931 World Series to the St. Louis Cardinals in seven games. The series loss prevented the Athletics from becoming the first major league baseball team to win three consecutive World Series; the New York Yankees would accomplish the feat a mere seven years later. The Athletics, ironically, would go on to earn their own threepeat in 1974, some forty-three years after the failed 1931 attempt.

1931 was also the A's final World Series appearance in Philadelphia. Their next AL pennant would be in 1972, after they had moved to Oakland.

1932 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1932 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing second in the American League with a record of 94 wins and 60 losses. The team finished 13 games behind the New York Yankees, breaking their streak of three straight AL championships.

1934 Boston Red Sox season

The 1934 Boston Red Sox season was the 34th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 76 wins and 76 losses.

1934 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1934 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 5th in the American League with a record of 78 wins and 82 losses.

1935 Boston Red Sox season

The 1935 Boston Red Sox season was the 35th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 78 wins and 75 losses. This was the Red Sox' first season with more wins than losses since 1918.

Bob Kline

Robert George Kline [Junior] (December 9, 1909 – March 16, 1987) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for three teams between the 1930 and 1934 seasons. Listed at 6' 3", 200 lb., Kline batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Enterprise, Ohio.

Eddie Rommel

Edwin Americus Rommel (September 13, 1897 – August 26, 1970) was an American right-handed pitcher and umpire in Major League Baseball. He spent his entire playing career (1920 to 1932) with the Philadelphia Athletics. He is considered to be the "father" of the modern knuckleball.

Oakland Athletics award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Oakland Athletics professional baseball franchise.

The team was first known as the Philadelphia Athletics from 1901 to 1954 and then as the Kansas City Athletics from 1955 to 1967.

Walberg

Walberg is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Garry Walberg (1921–2012), American actor

Mark L. Walberg (born 1962), American actor and television personality

Rube Walberg (1896–1978), American baseball player

Tim Walberg (born 1951), American politician

Vance Walberg (born 1956), American basketball player and coach

Vicki-Lee Walberg (born 1975), English model

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