Rube Bressler

Raymond Bloom "Rube" Bressler (October 23, 1894 – November 7, 1966) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball for the Philadelphia Athletics from 1914 to 1916 and Cincinnati Reds from 1917 to 1920, before being converted to an outfielder and first baseman for Cincinnati from 1918 to 1927, the Brooklyn Robins from 1928 to 1931 and the Philadelphia Phillies and St. Louis Cardinals in his final year of 1931. The first two teams he played for made it to a World Series, the 1914 Philadelphia Athletics lost to the miracle Boston Braves, while the 1919 Cincinnati Reds won against the scandal-tainted Chicago White Sox.

Bressler was born in Coder, Pennsylvania and grew up in nearby Flemington, Pennsylvania. He played for a company team at Renovo, Pennsylvania where he worked in a railroad shop before being recruited by Earle Mack, son of Connie Mack after beating Earle's All-Stars in a local game in 1912.

Rube Bressler
Rube Bressler.jpeg
Left fielder / Pitcher
Born: October 23, 1894
Coder, Pennsylvania
Died: November 7, 1966 (aged 72)
Cincinnati
Batted: Right Threw: Left
MLB debut
April 24, 1914, for the Philadelphia Athletics
Last MLB appearance
July 17, 1932, for the St. Louis Cardinals
MLB statistics
Batting average.301
Home runs32
Runs batted in586
Win–loss record26–32
Earned run average3.40
Strikeouts229
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Professional career

The following year, Bressler pitched for Harrisburg of the Tri-State League and, the year after that, was brought to the Philadelphia club as the newest player at the end of the famous 1910–1914 dynasty. Bressler was assigned to room with future Hall of Fame pitcher Chief Bender when he made his big league debut April 24, 1914. He posted a respectable 10-4 record and 1.77 ERA for the 1914 American League champions, before dropping to a 4-17 record with a 5.20 ERA the following year. By 1916, he dropped to 0-2 with a 6.60 ERA and was sent down to the minor leagues.

But with America's entry into World War I and a shortage of qualified professional baseball players, Cincinnati of the National League brought him back. His 8-5 record and 2.46 ERA in 1918 earned him two more seasons with the club as a pitcher. He finished his pitching career in 1920 with a lifetime record of 26-32, and a 3.40 ERA

Though Bressler's career as a pitcher was short-lived, he would go on to play more than a decade as an outfielder and first baseman. In his first season as a position player in 1918, Bressler appeared in only three games off the pitcher's mound. He split the next two seasons before it became apparent he would serve the team better as a slick-fielding, good-hitting position player than as an injury-prone pitcher. From 1921 onward, Bressler became a full-time position player, never pitching another game in the major leagues. He finished his career with 1170 base hits, 586 RBI and a .301 batting average.

In the final years of his life, Bressler was interviewed by writer Lawrence Ritter for Ritter's baseball classic The Glory of Their Times. Bressler died in Cincinnati at age 72, one of only a few players in major league baseball history to successfully convert from a pitcher to a position player.

Bressler was inducted into the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame in 1963.

Bressler is one of six players since 1900 in the major leagues who started their careers as pitchers and ended up as position players while totaling more than 50 games pitched and 50 games played at other positions. The others include[1] Babe Ruth, Smoky Joe Wood, Johnny Cooney, Reb Russell, and Rick Ankiel. Lefty O'Doul was also famous for having switched from pitcher to position player, however, he pitched in only 34 games for 77 total innings pitched with just two decisions.

References

  1. ^ "Rube Bressler Redux?". by Dan Fox. 09-16-05. Check date values in: |date= (help)

External links

1914 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1914 Philadelphia Athletics season was a season in American baseball. It involved the A's finishing first in the American League with a record of 99 wins and 53 losses. They went on to face the Boston Braves in the 1914 World Series, which they lost in four straight games.

After the season, Connie Mack sold his best players off to other teams due to his frustration with the Federal League. The A's would then post seven consecutive last place finishes in the American League and would not win another pennant until 1929.

1915 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1915 Philadelphia Athletics season was a season in American baseball. After the team won the American League pennant in 1914, the team dropped all the way to last place with a record of 43 wins and 109 losses.

1916 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1916 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 36 wins and 117 losses. The 1916 team is often considered by baseball historians the worst team in American League history, and its .235 winning percentage is still the lowest ever for a modern (post-1900) big-league team.

1917 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1917 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the National League with a record of 78–76, 20 games behind the New York Giants.

1918 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1918 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the National League with a record of 68–60, 15½ games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1919 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1919 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The Reds won the National League pennant, then went on to win the 1919 World Series. The team's accomplishments were overshadowed by the subsequent Black Sox scandal, when it was discovered that their American League opponents, the Chicago White Sox had conspired to throw the series.

1920 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1920 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the National League with a record of 82–71, 10½ games behind the Brooklyn Robins.

1924 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1924 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the National League with a record of 83–70, 10 games behind the New York Giants.

1926 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1926 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the National League with 87 wins and 67 losses, 2 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1927 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1927 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the National League with a record of 75–78, 18½ games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1928 Brooklyn Robins season

The 1928 Brooklyn Robins finished in 6th place, despite pitcher Dazzy Vance leading the league in strikeouts for a seventh straight season as well as posting a career best 2.09 ERA.

1928 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1928 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the National League with a record of 78–74, 16 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1929 Brooklyn Robins season

The 1929 Brooklyn Robins finished the season in 6th place for the fifth straight season.

1930 Brooklyn Robins season

The 1930 Brooklyn Robins were in first place from mid-May through mid-August but faded down the stretch and finished the season in fourth place.

1931 Brooklyn Robins season

The 1931 Brooklyn Robins finished in 4th place, after which longtime manager Wilbert Robinson announced his retirement with 1,375 career victories.

1932 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1932 Philadelphia Phillies season.

Bressler

Bressler is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Bernard H. Bressler is a Canadian physiologist and neuroscientist

Charles Bressler (1926–1996), American tenor

Rube Bressler (1894–1966), American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball

Clotilde Bressler-Gianoli (1875–1912), Swiss-born opera singerFictional characters:

General Bressler, character in Falling Skies

Coder, Pennsylvania

Coder is an unincorporated community in Jefferson County, Pennsylvania. It sits at an elevation of 1,276 feet (389 m).

The Glory of Their Times

The Glory of Their Times: The Story of the Early Days of Baseball Told by the Men Who Played It is a book, edited by Lawrence Ritter, telling the stories of early 20th century baseball. It is widely acclaimed as one of the great books written about baseball.

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