Rubén Sierra

Rubén Angel Sierra García (born October 6, 1965) is a former Major League Baseball outfielder. Sierra goes by the nicknames El Caballo and El Indio.

Over 20 seasons, Sierra played for the Texas Rangers (1986–92, 2000–01, 2003), Oakland Athletics (1992–95), New York Yankees (1995–96, 2003–05), Detroit Tigers (1996), Cincinnati Reds (1997), Toronto Blue Jays (1997), Chicago White Sox (1998), Seattle Mariners (2002) and Minnesota Twins (2006). Sierra also signed with the Cleveland Indians at the end of 1999 [1], but was released towards the end of spring training in March 2000. [2]

Rubén Sierra
Rubensierra1
Right fielder / Designated hitter
Born: October 6, 1965 (age 53)
Río Piedras, Puerto Rico
Batted: Switch Threw: Right
MLB debut
June 1, 1986, for the Texas Rangers
Last MLB appearance
July 9, 2006, for the Minnesota Twins
MLB statistics
Batting average.268
Hits2,152
Home runs306
Runs batted in1,322
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Early life

Sierra graduated from Liceo Interamericano Castro High School in Puerto Rico in 1983, where he played baseball, basketball and volleyball.

MLB career

In November 1982, the Texas Rangers signed 17-year-old Sierra out of Puerto Rico.[3] Sierra made his major league debut on June 1, 1986 as an outfielder and hit a home run in just his second MLB at bat becoming the first Texas Rangers player to accomplish this feat.[4] Sierra had a decent rookie year hitting .264 with 16 home runs and 55 RBIs.

In 1989, Sierra hit 29 home runs, and led the league in RBIs (119), slugging (.543), and extra bases (78).[5] Despite superior numbers, he finished second in MVP voting to Robin Yount, who was a superior defender on a better team. He went on to have 3 years with 100+ RBIs with the Rangers.[6] In August 1992, the Rangers traded Sierra to the Oakland Athletics for José Canseco.[7] He later played more years with the Rangers.

In 1995, the A's traded Sierra to the New York Yankees for Danny Tartabull.[8] After helping the Yankees reach the playoffs for the first time in 14 years in 1995, Sierra was traded to the Detroit Tigers with Matt Drews for Cecil Fielder.[9] Sierra was considered a journeyman because of playing for numerous teams during the late-1990s, including the Reds, Blue Jays, White Sox and Indians. After making a comeback with the Rangers in late 2000, he would go on to achieve moderate success with the Rangers in 2001, winning AL Comeback Player of the Year, and Mariners in 2002. In 2003, during Sierra's third stint with the Rangers, he was traded back to the Yankees, who were looking for a power-hitter off the bench. Sierra was an important part of the 2004 Yankees, a team that hit over 240 home runs. Sierra himself slugged 17 of those homers as the usual designated hitter, playing in 56 games at the position.[10]

In Game 4 of the 2004 American League Division Series, with the Yankees down to the Minnesota Twins 5–2, Sierra hit a 3-run home run to tie the game at 5–5 off of reliever Juan Rincón.[11] His clutch home run helped the Yankees rally to win the game and the series. However, he was the final out of Game 7 of the 2004 American League Championship Series, hitting a ground ball to Pokey Reese, which secured the dramatic comeback victory of the Boston Red Sox. Sierra had an injury plagued 2005 season and was let go by the Yankees after hitting just 4 home runs.[12] In 2006, Sierra signed a minor league contract with the Minnesota Twins, but was released on July 10.[13] In August, Sierra was offered a chance to sign on with the New York Mets for the September run and playoffs. However, due to family issues (illness to his mother), he opted not to play again in 2006.

In January 2007, Sierra signed a minor league contract with the Mets, who invited him to spring training. However, on March 20, he requested and was granted his release by the team after being reassigned the previous Thursday.[14]

See also

References

  1. ^ "+THURSDAY'S SPORTS TRANSACTIONS+". UPI. Retrieved October 12, 2018.
  2. ^ "TRANSACTIONS". Retrieved October 12, 2018.
  3. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/players/s/sierrru01.shtml
  4. ^ http://newyork.mets.mlb.com/team/player_career.jsp?player_id=122218&y=1986
  5. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/players/s/sierrru01.shtml
  6. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/players/s/sierrru01.shtml
  7. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/players/s/sierrru01.shtml
  8. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/players/s/sierrru01.shtml
  9. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/players/s/sierrru01.shtml
  10. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/players/s/sierrru01.shtml
  11. ^ http://www.pinstripedbible.com/2010/10/06/top-five-moments-in-twins-yankees-alds-history/
  12. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/players/s/sierrru01.shtml
  13. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/players/s/sierrru01.shtml
  14. ^ Shpigel, Ben (March 20, 2007). "Sierra Released; Sanchez On the Mend". The New York Times.

External links

1986 Texas Rangers season

The Texas Rangers 1986 season involved the Rangers finishing 2nd in the American League west with a record of 87 wins and 75 losses.

1987 Texas Rangers season

The Texas Rangers 1987 season involved the Rangers finishing sixth in the American League West with a record of 75 wins and 87 losses.

1988 Texas Rangers season

The Texas Rangers 1988 season involved the Rangers finishing 6th in the American League west with a record of 70 wins and 91 losses.

1989 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1989 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 60th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 11, 1989, at Anaheim Stadium in Anaheim, California, the home of the California Angels of the American League. The game is noted for being the first in All-Star Game history to include the designated hitter. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 5-3. The game is remembered for Bo Jackson's monstrous lead-off home run to center field. Jackson was named the game's MVP. The game also featured former U.S. President and former baseball announcer Ronald Reagan sharing the NBC broadcast booth with Vin Scully for the first inning.

The pregame ceremonies featured Disney characters joining this year's players in sprinting onto the field for the introduction of the starting lineups. Mike Schmidt of the Philadelphia Phillies, who had retired on May 29, was still elected by the fans as the starting third baseman for the NL All-Star team. Schmidt decided not to play, but he did participate in the game's opening ceremony in uniform. Doc Severinsen later led The Tonight Show Band in the playing of the Canadian and U.S. national anthems. Severinsen and The Tonight Show Band's performance of the U.S. National Anthem was the last non-vocal performance of the Anthem at the All-Star Game to date. The ceremonial first pitch was thrown by longtime Angels coach Jimmie Reese.

This was the second All-Star Game to be played in Anaheim, which last hosted the Midsummer Classic in 1967. It would return to the by-now renovated and renamed Angel Stadium of Anaheim in 2010.

1989 Texas Rangers season

The Texas Rangers 1989 season involved the Rangers finishing fourth in the American League West with a record of 83 wins and 79 losses.

1991 Texas Rangers season

The 1991 Texas Rangers season involved the Rangers finishing third in the American League West with a record of 85 wins and 77 losses.

1992 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1992 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 63rd playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 14, 1992, at Jack Murphy Stadium in San Diego, the home of the San Diego Padres of the National League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 13–6.

1992 Oakland Athletics season

The Oakland Athletics' 1992 season was the team's 25th in Oakland, California. It was also the 92nd season in franchise history. The team finished first in the American League West with a record of 96-66.

The Athletics entered the 1992 season with high hopes. The team, in particular, hoped to see its pitching staff rebound from a dreadful 1991 performance; the Athletics' team earned run average (ERA) had ballooned from 3.18 in 1990 (1st of 14 AL teams) to 4.57 in 1991 (13th of 14 AL teams). The Athletics also hoped to continue their success on offense; in 1991, the team had scored a respectable 760 runs (the fifth-highest total in the AL). The offense, as always, was centered on superstars Mark McGwire, José Canseco, and Rickey Henderson.

The Athletics' hopes were largely answered. The team's pitching staff finished the season with an ERA of 3.73; this was the fourth-best average in the American League. Starter Dave Stewart, after an abysmal 1991 campaign, lowered his ERA to a respectable 3.66; his resurgence was mirrored by Bob Welch, who returned to near-ace status with a 3.27 ERA. The offense performed similarly well. Mark McGwire, following an awful 1991 campaign (in which he batted just .206 with 22 home runs), posted a .268 average in 1992 (while knocking in 42 homers). Rickey Henderson stole 48 bases, Mike Bordick hit exactly .300, and José Canseco slugged another 22 home runs. Canseco was famously traded to the Texas Rangers, mid-game, on August 31; the Athletics received outfielder Rubén Sierra, reliever Jeff Russell, and starter Bobby Witt. The Athletics again scored the fourth-most runs in the American League in 1992.

The bulk of the Athletics' 1992 accolades, however, went to closer Dennis Eckersley. Eckersley saved an MLB-leading 51 games over the course of the season; in the process, he posted a 7-1 record with a 1.91 ERA. Eckersley's efforts netted him both the 1992 AL Cy Young Award and the 1992 AL MVP Award. Eckersley remains the last reliever (and remained, until 2011, the last pitcher of any kind) to be named MVP in either league.

The Athletics finished the 1992 season six games ahead of the second place (defending champion) Minnesota Twins. The division championship was their fourth in five years. In the ALCS, the A's faced a strong Toronto Blue Jays side. The first three games of the series were decided by two runs or fewer; at the end of the Game 3, Oakland trailed Toronto 2 games to 1. In Game 4, Oakland led the Jays 6-1 after seven innings; a furious Toronto rally, however, resulted in a 7-6 Toronto victory (and a 3-1 Blue Jays series lead). The Athletics never recovered from the collapse, and ultimately succumbed to the favored Jays in six games.

The 1992 season signaled the end of an era in Oakland. The team would miss the postseason in each of the next seven seasons; by the time of the Athletics' next division title (2000), no members of the 1992 team remained in Oakland.

1992 Texas Rangers season

The 1992 Texas Rangers season saw the Rangers finishing fourth in the American League West with a record of 77 wins and 85 losses.

1995 American League Division Series

The 1995 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 1995 American League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 3, and ended on Sunday, October 8, with the champions of the three AL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. As a result of both leagues realigning into three divisions in 1994, it marked the first time in major league history that a team could qualify for postseason play without finishing in first place in its league or division. The teams were:

(1) Seattle Mariners (Western Division champion, 79–66) vs. (4) New York Yankees (Wild Card, 79–65): Mariners win series, 3–2.

(2) Boston Red Sox (Eastern Division champion, 86–58) vs. (3) Cleveland Indians (Central Division champion, 100–44): Indians win series, 3–0.The format of this series and the NLDS was the same as the League Championship Series prior to 1985, a five-game set wherein the first two games were played at one stadium and the last three at the other. This was much criticized as the team with home field advantage had its games back ended while a team with two games often preferred them in the middle as opposed to three straight in the opposing team's ballpark. The highly unpopular format was changed in 1998 for the present and more logical 2–2–1 format, which has been used in the LDS since except for 2012, when the 2-3 format was used due to the additional of the Wild Card games.

Because of realignment, this was the first time that both the Yankees and the Red Sox reached the playoffs in the same year.The Seattle Mariners and Cleveland Indians went on to meet in the AL Championship Series (ALCS). The Indians became the American League champion, and lost to the National League champion Atlanta Braves in the 1995 World Series.

1995 Caribbean Series

The thirty-seventh edition of the Caribbean Series (Serie del Caribe) was held from February 3 through February 8 of 1995 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The series featured four teams from Dominican Republic, Mexico, Puerto Rico and Venezuela. The hometown team, the Senadores de San Juan of the Puerto Rican League won the series. The team was managed by Luis Meléndez. The Most Valuable Player was Roberto Alomar, a second baseman with the Senadores de San Juan.

While the San Juan club had faced difficulty in emerging as the champions of the Puerto Rican Winter League, the team swept its way through the six-game Series by a 49-15 score. The Azucareros del Este of the Dominican League lost one game 16-0 by Puerto Rico. However they won all of their games against the other teams thanks to the arms of José Rijo, Pedro Martínez and Pedro Astacio to place second with a 4-2 record.

Puerto Rico was helped by having many major leaguers who normally would have taken off the time for spring training. Roberto Alomar (.560, 10 RBI, 9 R, .840 SLG, 2 SB) was the Series MVP and he was helped by Bernie Williams (.417, .875 SLG), Juan González (.375, .667 SLG), Edgar Martínez (.375, 9 RBI), Carlos Baerga, Rubén Sierra, a young Carlos Delgado hitting cleanup, Roberto Hernández, Rey Sánchez (.333), Doug Brocail (1-0, 1.00), José Alberro (1-0, 0.00 in 4 games), Eric Gunderson (1-0, 1.13), Ricky Bones and Chris Haney (2.45) among others. Sanchez had won the Puerto Rican Winter League batting title but batted 9th with the superb lineup in front of him.

1995 Oakland Athletics season

The Oakland Athletics' 1995 season was the team's 28th in Oakland, California. It was also the 95th season in franchise history. The team finished fourth in the American League West with a record of 67-77.

The Athletics, for a third consecutive year, found themselves mired in mediocrity. As had been the case in both 1993 and 1994, an average-to-poor offense (headlined by Mark McGwire, Rickey Henderson, and Rubén Sierra) was sabotaged by one of the league's worst pitching staffs. For a third consecutive season, no Athletics starter posted an earned run average (ERA) of less than 4.50; only one such starter, Todd Stottlemyre, managed to record double-digit wins in the strike-shortened campaign.

The Athletics, despite their weak pitching, managed to contend in the first half of the season. On July 1, a win over the division-leading California Angels brought them within 1.5 games of first place; it also ran their record to a surprising 34-28. As had been the case in 1994, the A's followed their surprising start with a prolonged slump; between July 2 and August 15, the team went only 13-28. The collapse, along with an Angels surge (the Angels went 30-11 over the same span) left the A's 17.5 games out of first place. As had also been the case in 1994, Oakland mounted a dramatic comeback; an Angels collapse, combined with a surge of their own, allowed them to pull within five games of first place on September 20. The September 20th victory would be their last, as Oakland lost each of the regular season's final nine games. They finished the campaign eleven games behind the AL West champion Seattle Mariners.

The Athletics' on-field mediocrity, however, contained a few bright spots. Mark McGwire clubbed 39 home runs in a mere 104 games; he would hit at least 50 in each of the four subsequent seasons. The 1995 season also saw the debut of future superstar Jason Giambi. Giambi, in his first major league season, batted .256 with six home runs in 54 games. Lastly, the season was Tony La Russa's last as Oakland's manager. He, along with most of the Athletics' assistant coaches, would join the St. Louis Cardinals in 1996.

1996 Detroit Tigers season

The 1996 Detroit Tigers had a record of 53–109 for the third worst winning percentage (.327) in team history. With a number of capable batters (Cecil Fielder, Tony Clark, Bobby Higginson, Alan Trammell, Rubén Sierra, and Damion Easley), the team scored a respectable 783 runs. However, the 1996 Tigers lacked pitching and allowed their opponents to score 1,103 runs. No team in American League history and only one in major league history (the 1930 Philadelphia Phillies) has given up more runs. No pitcher on the team had more than 7 wins. Of the games the Tigers lost, 58 were by four or more runs, a record for the number of games lost by such a margin. The Tigers made more unwanted history when they were swept 12–0 by the Cleveland Indians in the regular season series, losing all twelve games played while being outscored, 79–28.

1998 Chicago White Sox season

The 1998 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 99th season. They finished with a record 80-82, good enough for 2nd place in the American League Central, 9 games behind the 1st place Cleveland Indians.

2001 Texas Rangers season

The Texas Rangers 2001 season involved the Rangers finishing 4th in the American League west with a record of 73 wins and 89 losses.

2003 Texas Rangers season

The Texas Rangers 2003 season involved the Rangers finishing 4th in the American League west with a record of 71 wins and 91 losses.

2003 World Series

The 2003 World Series was the championship series of Major League Baseball's (MLB) 2003 season. The 99th edition of the World Series, it was a best-of-seven playoff between the National League (NL) champion Florida Marlins and the American League (AL) champion New York Yankees; the Marlins upset the heavily-favored Yankees, four games to two. The series was played from October 18 to 25, 2003. This is the most recent Series in which the losing team outscored the winning team; the Yankees lost, despite outscoring the Marlins 21–17 in the Series. This was the Marlins' second World Series championship win, having won their first in 1997. As of 2018, this is the last time the Marlins have appeared not only in the World Series, but in the postseason at all.

2006 Minnesota Twins season

The Minnesota Twins 2006 season ended with Minnesota finishing the regular season as champions of the American League Central Division, but were swept in three games by the Oakland Athletics in the 2006 American League Division Series.

Independent baseball league

An independent baseball league is a professional baseball organization located in the United States and Canada that is not operated in conjunction with either a Major League Baseball team or an affiliated Minor League Baseball team. Being independent allows teams to be located close to major league teams without their consent. Such leagues have been around for many years and were once known as "outlaw leagues" due to their position outside the rules of affiliated minor league baseball.

The Northern League and Frontier League both started play in 1993, and the Northern League's success paved the way for other independent leagues like the Texas-Louisiana League and Northeast League. The Atlantic League has had more marquee players than any other independent league, including Jose Canseco, Rickey Henderson, Ozzie Canseco, Rubén Sierra, Carlos Baerga, and John Rocker. The Northern League alumni include Leon "Bull" Durham, J. D. Drew, and Darryl Strawberry.

Independent leagues have flourished in northeastern states, where dense populations can often support multiple franchises. Because they are not subject to the territorial limitations imposed on affiliated minor-league teams, independent clubs can relocate as close to affiliated teams (and one another) as they choose to. For example, the city of Lancaster, Pennsylvania cannot have an affiliated team because of its proximity to the Harrisburg Senators and Reading Fightin Phils, leaving the Atlantic League to place a team—the Lancaster Barnstormers—to fill the void. Another example is the greater New York City metropolitan area, where there are many independent teams: the Long Island Ducks, New Jersey Jackals, Rockland Boulders, Somerset Patriots, and Sussex County Miners. The Kansas City area is home not only to the American League's Kansas City Royals, but also the independent Kansas City T-Bones. The St. Paul Saints share a market with the American League's Minnesota Twins; both teams have frequently worked together to promote baseball in the Upper Midwest.

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