Roynell Young

Roynell Young (born December 1, 1957) is a former professional American football safety and cornerback who played for the Philadelphia Eagles his entire National Football League (NFL) career, from 1980 to 1988. Young was selected by the Eagles from Alcorn State University in the first round (23rd overall) of the 1980 NFL Draft. In his rookie year, he played in Super Bowl XV and was selected to the Pro Bowl in his second season. He was one of two players who played in both Super Bowl XV and The Fog Bowl for the Eagles. The other was offensive lineman Ron Baker. Young was inducted to the Alcorn State University Sports Hall of Fame in November 2017.[1]

Roynell Young
No. 43
Position:Safety/Cornerback
Personal information
Born:December 1, 1957 (age 61)
New Orleans, Louisiana
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:181 lb (82 kg)
Career information
High school:New Orleans (LA) Cohen
College:Alcorn State
NFL Draft:1980 / Round: 1 / Pick: 23
Career history
Career highlights and awards
  • Pro Bowl selection (1981)
Player stats at PFR

Pro-Vision

In 1990, Young founded "Pro-Vision", a youth and community development organization. Originally a youth mentoring program, Young grew Pro-Vision to include an all-male charter middle school, Vision Academy high school, job training program, and manhood development academy. Under his leadership, Pro-Vision has provided services to over 3,000 young men from Houston’s most underserved communities. The average high school graduation rate of Pro-Vision students is 90%.[2]

The 21-acre Pro-Vision campus is located in southeast Houston, and features an Urban Farm, 8 class rooms, technology center, and a library.

In recognition of his work at Pro-Vision, Young has received numerous awards including the Channel 13 Community Service Award and the 1998 Savvy Award presented by Foley’s and the Houston Chronicle. He has also been recognized by Governor Rick Perry, former US Secretary of Education Rod Paige, Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee, former Congressman Chris Bell, and Congressman Al Green.

Young’s work with Pro-Vision has been featured in numerous publications including the New York Times,[3] Men's Journal,[4] Time for Kids, and Guideposts.[5]

References

  1. ^ http://hbcunetwork.com/content/330013/former-alcorn-state-university-braves-roynell-young-james-williams-to-be-inducted-into-swac-hall-of-fame
  2. ^ http://provisionschool.org/School-Statistics.html
  3. ^ "Winning Against Hopelessness". New York Times. September 16, 2008.
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-07-06. Retrieved 2011-01-26.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ http://www.guideposts.org/inspirational-stories/inspiring-story-nfl-player-finding-new-purpose-through-troubled-boys
1979 College Football All-America Team

The 1979 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1979. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes four selectors as "official" for the 1979 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) based on the input of more than 2,000 voting members; (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) selected by the nation's football writers; and (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers. Other selectors included Football News (FN), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), The Sporting News (TSN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC).

1980 NFL Draft

The 1980 NFL draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held April 29–30, 1980, at the New York Sheraton Hotel in New York City, New York. The league also held a supplemental draft after the regular draft and before the regular season. This draft is notable as the first that the nascent ESPN network (which had first gone on the air seven months earlier) aired in its entirety, and the first to be televised.

1980 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1980 Philadelphia Eagles season was the team's 48th season in the National Football League (NFL). The Eagles won twelve of their sixteen games, winning their division for the first time in twenty years. The Eagles started the season winning eleven of their first twelve games, only to finish the season losing three of their final four. Still, the 12–4 record was good enough to win the NFC East division title for the first time in franchise history since the NFC East had been formed.

The 1980 season marked the Eagles' third consecutive playoff appearance under coach Dick Vermeil, and culminated in the team's first Super Bowl appearance, where they were defeated by the Oakland Raiders.

1980–81 NFL playoffs

The National Football League playoffs for the 1980 season began on December 28, 1980. The postseason tournament concluded with the Oakland Raiders defeating the Philadelphia Eagles in Super Bowl XV, 27–10, on January 25, 1981, at the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana.

1981 All-Pro Team

The 1981 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1981. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. The Associated Press added a "nose tackle" position in 1981, joining Pro Football Weekly .

1981 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1981 Philadelphia Eagles season resulted in an appearance in the postseason for the fourth straight season (first time in franchise history the Eagles had made the postseason four straight times). The team was coming off a Super Bowl loss to the Oakland Raiders the previous season. Because they made the Super Bowl in 1980, they were picked by many to not only reach the Super Bowl, but to win it as well. The Eagles began the 1981 season with 6 straight wins, their best ever start to a season at the time. The Eagles would win then 3 of their next 5 games to sit at 9-2. They would then lose their next 4 games to slip to 9-6 and were in danger of missing out on the playoffs. The next week, they hammered the Cardinals 38-0 to clinch a playoff berth for the fourth straight season. In the playoffs, they met their arch rivals the Giants. It was New York's first playoff appearance in 18 years. In the game, the Giants would stun the eagles 27-21, ending the Eagles season as well as hopes for a second straight Super Bowl appearance. The Eagles would not make the playoffs again until 1988. They also wouldn't reach the Super Bowl again until 2004.

1984 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1984 Philadelphia Eagles season was their 52nd in the National Football League (NFL). The team improved upon their previous output of 5–11, winning six games. Despite the improvement, the team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the third straight season.

Whatever outside chance the Birds had to make the playoffs was sunk on November 25 at St. Louis, when starting quarterback Ron Jaworski suffered a broken leg and missed the remainder of the season. It was the most serious injury the "Polish Rifle" ever suffered in his long career. Joe Pisarcik took over under center for the final three-plus games.

1986 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1986 Philadelphia Eagles season was their 54th in the league. The team was unable to improve upon their previous output win total of seven. Instead, the team finished with five wins, ten losses and one tie. This was the fifth consecutive season in which the team failed to qualify for the playoffs.

The season was coach Buddy Ryan’s first with the team after serving as the defensive coordinator of the 1985 Chicago Bears, who had won the Super Bowl in that season.

Quarterback duties were split between 35-year-old veteran Ron Jaworski, who started nine games in his final season with the team, and second-year quarterback Randall Cunningham. Veteran quarterback Matt Cavanaugh also started two games. The Eagles’ passing game struggled, with the third-fewest passing yards in the league (2,540), and the fewest yards-per-attempt (4.1).

The Eagles set dubious NFL records by giving up a record number of sacks (a still-standing NFL-record of 104) and yardage allowed on sacks (708). No other team in football history had ever given up more than 78 sacks or 554 yards on quarterback sacks. The team gave up three-or-more sacks in every single game of the 1986 season, the only team in NFL history to do so.The lone highlights of the season came on the road. On October 5, the Birds entered Fulton County Stadium and shut out the previously-undefeated Atlanta Falcons, 16–0. then gained a comeback 33–27 OT win against the Raiders at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on November 30, the Eagles’ first win over the club since the 1980 season and first-ever victory on the road against the Oakland/LA franchise.

1988 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1988 Philadelphia Eagles season was the franchise's 56th season in the National Football League.

This season resulted an appearance in the postseason for the first time since 1981. The Eagles won the NFC East for the first time in seven seasons, but lost to the Chicago Bears in the NFC Divisional round during the Fog Bowl.

On the final day of the regular season, Philadelphia dumped Dallas, 23–7, but had to wait for the end to the Jets-Giants game at Giants Stadium to learn if they had clinched the division or not. The Jets won the game, 27–21, on a late TD strike from Ken O'Brien to Al Toon, giving the Eagles the NFC East crown on the tiebreaker of having beaten the Giants in both regular-season meetings.

Alcorn State Braves football

The Alcorn State Braves are the college football team representing the Alcorn State University. The Braves play in NCAA Division I Football Championship as a member of the Southwestern Athletic Conference.

Alcorn State University

Alcorn State University (shortened to Alcorn State, ASU or Alcorn) is a public, historically black, comprehensive, land-grant institution located northwest of Lorman, Mississippi in rural Claiborne County. It was founded in 1871 by the Reconstruction-era legislature to provide higher education for freedmen. It is the first black land grant college established in the United States. Its main campus is approximately 80 miles southwest of Jackson, Mississippi.

One of Alcorn's most notable alumni, Medgar Evers, a civil rights activist, graduated in 1952. Students at the college were part of the mid-twentieth century civil rights movement, working to register residents for voting and to end racial inequality. Other alumni have been activists, politicians and professionals in Mississippi and other states. The university is a member-school of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund.

Alcorn State's athletic teams known as the Braves and compete in the NCAA's Division I. All teams compete as members of the Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC)

Leslie Frazier

Leslie Antonio Frazier (born April 3, 1959) is an American football coach and former cornerback who is the defensive coordinator of the Buffalo Bills. He served as the head coach of the Minnesota Vikings from 2011 to 2013.

List of Alcorn State Braves in the NFL draft

This is a list of Alcorn State Braves football players in the NFL draft.

List of Philadelphia Eagles first-round draft picks

The Philadelphia Eagles, a professional American football team based in Philadelphia, joined the National Football League (NFL) in 1933 as a replacement team for the Frankford Yellow Jackets, after the Yellow Jackets went bankrupt and ceased operations. After the AFL–NFL merger in 1970, the Eagles were moved to the current NFC East division. Every April, each NFL franchise adds new players to its roster through a collegiate draft at the "NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting", more commonly known as the NFL Draft. Teams are ranked in inverse order based on their previous season's records, with the worst record picking first, the second-worst picking second, and so on. Two exceptions to this order are made for teams that played in the previous Super Bowl: the Super Bowl champion picks last (32nd), and the Super Bowl loser picks next to last (31st). Teams often trade their picks to other teams for different picks, players, cash, or combinations thereof; thus, it is not uncommon for a team's actual draft pick to differ from its assigned pick, or for a team to have extra or no draft picks in a particular round.The Eagles' first selection as an NFL team was Jay Berwanger, a running back from University of Chicago. The Eagles have selected number one overall three times, including Berwanger in 1936, Sam Francis in 1937, and Chuck Bednarik in 1949, second overall five times, and third overall three times. Three eventual Hall of Famers have been selected by the Eagles: Steve Van Buren, Bednarik, and Bob Brown. The team's most recent first-round choice was Derek Barnett, a defensive end from The University of Tennessee.

List of Philadelphia Eagles players

This is a complete list of American football players who have played for the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League (NFL). It includes players that have played at least one game in the NFL regular season. The Philadelphia Eagles franchise was founded in 1933. The Eagles played in four pre-Super Bowl Era NFL Championships (1947, 1948, 1949 and 1960) winning three (1948, 1949 and 1960). They have also played in three Super Bowls (XV, XXXIX and LII), winning Super Bowl LII.

List of Pro Bowl players, W-Z

The following is a list of players, both past and current, who have been selected to play in the NFL's annual Pro Bowl game, beginning with the 1950 season.

Between 1938 and 1942, an NFL all star team played the league champion in the NFL All-Star Game. Participants in these games are not recognized by the NFL as Pro Bowlers, and they are not included in this list. No games were played between 1943 and 1950.

Between 1961 and 1969, the NFL and AFL played separate all-star games. This list includes players who were selected to play in the American Football League All-Star game during that period.

Philadelphia Eagles

The Philadelphia Eagles (known in short as The Eagles) are a professional American football team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Eagles compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) East division. In the 2017 season the team won Super Bowl LII, their first Super Bowl win in franchise history and their fourth NFL title overall, after winning the Championship Game in 1948, 1949, and 1960.

The franchise was established in 1933 as a replacement for the bankrupt Frankford Yellow Jackets, when a group led by Bert Bell secured the rights to an NFL franchise in Philadelphia. Bell, Chuck Bednarik, Bob Brown, Brian Dawkins, Reggie White, Steve Van Buren, Tommy McDonald, Greasy Neale, Pete Pihos, Sonny Jurgensen, and Norm Van Brocklin have been inducted to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

The team has an intense rivalry with the New York Giants. This rivalry is the oldest in the NFC East and is among the oldest in the NFL. It was ranked by NFL Network as the number one rivalry of all-time and Sports Illustrated ranks it amongst the Top 10 NFL rivalries of all-time at number four, and according to ESPN, it is one of the fiercest and most well-known rivalries in the American football community. They also have a bitter rivalry with the Dallas Cowboys, which has become more high-profile since the 1960s, as well as a historic rivalry with the Washington Redskins. Their rivalry with the Pittsburgh Steelers is another bitter rivalry known as the battle of Pennsylvania, roughly dating back to 1933, that mostly arises from the two teams' statuses as being from opposite ends of the same state.The team consistently ranks among the best in the league in attendance and has sold out every game since the 1999 season. In a Sports Illustrated poll of 321 NFL players, Eagles fans were selected the most intimidating fans in the NFL.

Super Bowl XV

Super Bowl XV was an American football game between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Oakland Raiders and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Philadelphia Eagles to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1980 season. The Raiders defeated the Eagles by the score of 27–10, becoming the first wild card playoff team to win a Super Bowl.

The game was played at the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana, on January 25, 1981, five days after the Iran hostage crisis ended. The game was thus held under patriotic fervor, as the pregame ceremonies honored the end of the crisis.

The Raiders were making their third Super Bowl appearance after posting an 11–5 regular season record, but losing a tiebreaker to the AFC West division winner San Diego Chargers. Oakland then advanced to the Super Bowl with playoff victories over the Houston Oilers, Cleveland Browns, and San Diego. The Eagles were making their first Super Bowl appearance after posting a 12–4 regular season record and postseason victories over the Minnesota Vikings and the Dallas Cowboys.

Aided by two touchdown passes from quarterback Jim Plunkett, the Raiders jumped out to a 14–0 lead in the first quarter of Super Bowl XV, from which the Eagles never recovered. Oakland linebacker Rod Martin also intercepted Philadelphia quarterback Ron Jaworski three times for a Super Bowl record. Plunkett was named the Super Bowl MVP after completing 13 of 21 passes for 261 yards and three touchdowns, while also rushing for 9 yards. Plunkett was also the second Heisman Trophy winner to be named Super Bowl MVP after Roger Staubach in Super Bowl VI.

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