Royals Sports Television Network

The Royals Sports Television Network (RSTN) was a regional sports network serving the Kansas City area, Kansas, western Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Iowa owned by the Kansas City Royals. The network began operations before the 2003 Major League Baseball season in response to Fox Sports Midwest's decision to reduce the number of Royals games it broadcast. RSTN had trouble getting widespread carriage by cable systems in the area and had no satellite carriage. However, the Royals began the season with good form and RSTN was able to make a deal with Fox Sports Midwest in June to redistribute most of their broadcasts.[1] RSTN ceased operations after the 2007 season, with the Royals moving to the new channel Fox Sports Kansas City in 2008.[2][3]

The Royals Insider weekly magazine show won a Regional Emmy Award in 2005 for Best Sports Program.[4]

References

  1. ^ "RSTN reaches agreement with Fox Sports" (Press release). Kansas City Royals. June 4, 2003. Retrieved December 20, 2015.
  2. ^ "Royals and Fox Sports Kansas City announce television schedule" (Press release). Kansas City Royals. February 6, 2008. Retrieved December 20, 2015.
  3. ^ Kerkhoff, Blair (October 5, 2015). "Royals set TV rating record on Fox Sports KC". The Kansas City Star. Retrieved December 20, 2015.
  4. ^ "'Royals Insider' wins regional Emmy Award" (Press release). Kansas City Royals. November 4, 2005. Retrieved December 20, 2015.
2003 Kansas City Royals season

The 2003 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing third in the American League Central, with a record of 83 wins and 79 losses. It was the only winning season for the franchise between 1994 and 2013.

2003 was a hopeful and promising winning season ("We Believe" was the slogan) for the Royals, and the team spent 93 days in first place in the AL Central. But the team faded down the stretch, falling out of first place for the last time on August 31, and missed the playoffs.

2004 Kansas City Royals season

The 2004 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing 5th in the American League Central with a record of 58 wins and 104 losses. It was one of the most disappointing seasons in Royals' history. The team had been picked by many sporting magazines to win the AL Central following their third-place finish in 2003. Injuries of veteran acquisitions did the Royals in. Catcher Benito Santiago and outfielder Juan González both played very few games for the boys in blue. Mike Sweeney was also injured during the campaign. As a result, the Royals set a new record for most losses in franchise history.

2005 Kansas City Royals season

The 2005 Kansas City Royals season began on April 4 and ended October 2. The Royals competed and finished 5th in the American League Central with a record of 56 wins and 106 losses, 43 games behind first place Chicago White Sox. With 106 losses, the Royals set a record for the most losses in a single season in franchise history, and their third 100-loss season in 4 years. The 2005 Kansas City Royals were plagued by abysmal pitching and an anemic offense, and to date have one of the worst Major League Baseball season records of all-time.

2006 Kansas City Royals season

The 2006 Kansas City Royals season was the 38th season for the franchise, and their 36th at Kauffman Stadium. The Royals finishing 5th in the American League Central with a record of 62 wins and 100 losses and missed the playoffs for the 21st consecutive season.

Fox Major League Baseball

Fox Major League Baseball (shortened to Fox MLB and also known as Major League Baseball on Fox, MLB on Fox, or MLB on FS1) is a presentation of Major League Baseball (MLB) games produced by Fox Sports, the sports division of the Fox Broadcasting Company (Fox), since June 1, 1996. The broadcaster has aired the World Series in 1996, 1998 and every edition since 2000, and the All-Star Game in 1997, 1999, and every year since 2001. It has also aired the National League Championship Series and American League Championship Series in alternate years from 1996 to 2000, both series from 2001 to 2006, and again in alternate years since 2007, with the NLCS in even years and the ALCS in odd years. Under its current contract with MLB, Fox Sports will continue to carry MLB telecasts through at least the 2021 season, with national broadcasts on Fox and cable sports network Fox Sports 1.

Fox Sports Kansas City

Fox Sports Kansas City is an American regional sports network owned by The Walt Disney Company, and operates as an affiliate of Fox Sports Networks. The channel broadcasts coverage of professional, collegiate, and high school sports events both within and outside the Kansas City area. It maintains offices and master control operations at Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, Missouri.

Fox Sports Kansas City is available on cable providers throughout western and central Missouri, Kansas, eastern Nebraska, and Iowa; it is also available nationwide on satellite via DirecTV.

Fox Sports Midwest

Fox Sports Midwest is an American regional sports network owned by The Walt Disney Company, and operates as an affiliate of Fox Sports Networks. The channel broadcasts regional event coverage of sports teams throughout the Midwestern United States, most prominently, professional sports teams based in St. Louis, Missouri.

Fox Sports Midwest is available on cable providers throughout eastern and central Missouri, central and southern Illinois, Southern Indiana, Nebraska, and Iowa; it is also available nationwide on satellite via DirecTV and Dish Network.

Fox Sports Networks

Fox Sports Networks (FSN), formerly known as Fox Sports Net, is the collective name for a group of regional sports channels in the United States. Formed in 1996 by News Corporation, the group was acquired by The Walt Disney Company in March 2019 following its acquisition of 21st Century Fox. Under an agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice, Disney must sell the channels off to third parties by June 18, 2019, 90 days after the completion of its acquisition.Each of the channels in the group carries regional broadcasts of sporting events from various professional, collegiate and high school sports teams (with broadcasts typically exclusive to each individual channel, although some are shown on multiple FSN channels within a particular team's designated market area), along with regional and national sports discussion, documentary and analysis programs.

Depending on their individual team rights, some Fox Sports Networks maintain overflow feeds available via digital cable, telco and satellite providers in their home markets, which may provide alternate programming when not used to carry game broadcasts that the main feed cannot carry due to scheduling conflicts. Fox Sports Networks is headquartered in Houston, Texas, with master control facilities based in both Houston and Los Angeles; FSN also maintains production facilities at Stage 19 at Universal Studios Florida (which formerly served as home of Nickelodeon Studios until its closure in 2005).

Regional sports network

In the United States and Canada, a regional sports network (RSN) is a cable television channel (many of which are also distributed on direct broadcast satellite services) that presents sports programming to a local market or geographical region.

Historically, some RSNs originated as premium channels; since the 1990s, however, they have commonly been distributed through the expanded basic-programming tiers of cable and IPTV services, packaged alongside other national basic cable networks, and local broadcast stations and public, educational, and government access channels. Satellite providers often require subscribers to purchase a higher programming tier or a specialized sports tier to receive local and out-of-market regional sports networks.

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