Royal flycatcher

The royal flycatchers are a genus, Onychorhynchus, of passerine birds in the family Tityridae[1][2] family according to the IOC. Other taxonomic authorities including the AOU, Clements, and the IUCN, include it in Tyrannidae. Depending on authority, it includes a single widespread,[1] or four more localized species.[2] The specific epithet of the type species, coronatus, and the common name of all the species in this genus, royal flycatcher, refer to the striking, colourful crest,[3] which is seen displayed very rarely,[3] except after mating, while preening, in courtship as well as being handled.[3]

The genus contains four species:[2]

Image Scientific name Common Name Distribution
Onychorhynchus coronatus - Amazonian Royal Flycatcher Onychorhynchus coronatus Amazonian royal flycatcher Amazon basin in northern Bolivia, eastern Peru, eastern Ecuador, eastern Colombia, Venezuela, the Guianas, and northern and western Brazil
Royal Flycatcher - Rio Tigre - Costa Rica S4E9879 (26631231311) Onychorhynchus mexicanus Northern royal flycatcher Mexico, south through most of Central America, to north-western Colombia and far western Venezuela
Onychorhynchus occidentalis Pacific royal flycatcher Western Ecuador and far north-western Peru
Onychorhynchus swainsoni - Atlantic Royal Flycatcher 02 Onychorhynchus swainsoni Atlantic royal flycatcher Atlantic forest in south-eastern Brazil
Royal flycatcher
Onychorhynchus coronatus - Amazonian Royal Flycatcher
Amazonian royal flycatcher at Apiacás, Mato Grosso state, Brasil
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Tityridae
Genus: Onychorhynchus
Fischer von Waldheim, 1810

References

  1. ^ a b John H. Boyd III (September 28, 2011). "TYRANNIDA: Pipridae, Cotingidae, Tityridae". TiF Checklist. Retrieved March 24, 2012.
  2. ^ a b c Gill, Frank; Donsker, David, eds. (2017). "Cotingas, manakins, tityras & becards". World Bird List Version 7.3. International Ornithologists' Union. Retrieved 9 January 2018.
  3. ^ a b c Ridgely, Robert and John A. Gwynne Jr. (1989). A Guide to the Birds of Panama with Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Honduras. Princeton University Press. ISBN 0691025126.
Alto Purús National Park

Alto Purús National Park (Spanish: Parque Nacional Alto Purús) is a national park in the Amazon rainforest of Peru, established in 2004. It covers an area of 2,510,694.41 ha (9,693.85 sq mi) in the provinces of Purús (Ucayali), Tahuamanu and Tambopata (both in Madre de Dios).It is also home to a number of indigenous tribes, including some that have avoided contact with the outside world.

Amazonian royal flycatcher

The Amazonian royal flycatcher (Onychorhynchus coronatus) is a passerine bird of the tyrant flycatcher family. It is found in forest and woodland throughout most of the Amazon basin in northern Bolivia, eastern Peru, eastern Ecuador, eastern Colombia, Venezuela, the Guianas, and northern and western Brazil.

Amazonian royal flycatchers are 15–17.5 cm (5.9–6.9 in) in length and like to dart out from branches to catch flying insects or snap them up from leaves. They build very large nests (sometimes up to 2 m (6 ft 7 in) long) on branches near water. The nest hangs over the water which makes it hard for predators to reach.There are two subspecies:

O. c. castelnaui Deville, 1849 – west Amazonia

O. c. coronatus (Statius Müller, PL, 1776) – east Venezuela, the Guianas and north BrazilIt is easily overlooked and typically found in low densities, but overall it remains widespread and common. It is therefore rated as of least concern on the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List of Endangered species.

Atlantic royal flycatcher

The Atlantic royal flycatcher (Onychorhynchus swainsoni) is a passerine bird in the family Tityridae.

Measuring 16–16.5 cm (6.3–6.5 in), this large-billed flycatcher has a spectacular, but rarely seen, crest. It has largely uniform dull brown upperparts with pale, bright cinnamon rump and tail, a whitish throat, unmarked ochraceous buff underparts. The crest is usually left flat, giving a hammerhead shape to head. When raised, the crest displays a remarkable combination of scarlet, black and blue (yellow replaces red in the female).The Atlantic royal flycatcher is endemic to Atlantic forest in south-eastern Brazil. It is threatened by habitat loss.

Ecuadorian dry forests

The Ecuadorian dry forests (NT0214) is an ecoregion near the Pacific coast of the Ecuador.

The habitat has been occupied by people for centuries and has been severely damaged by deforestation, overgrazing and hillside erosion due to unsustainable agriculture.

Only 1% of the original forest remains. The patches of forest, mostly secondary growth, are fragmented.

They are home to many endemic species at risk of extinction.

Fauna of Colombia

The fauna of Colombia is characterized by a high biodiversity, with the highest rate of species by area unit worldwide.

Las Piedras River (Peru)

The Las Piedras River, (the "River of Stones"), is a major tributary of the Madre de Dios River in the southeast Peruvian Amazon.

List of birds by common name

In this list of birds by common name, a total of 9,722 extant and recently extinct bird species are recognised, belonging to a total of 204 families.

List of birds of Belize

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Belize. Belize includes around 450 smaller cays and islands lying in the Caribbean Sea in addition to the mainland. The avifauna of Belize include a total of 603 species as of February 2018, according to Bird Checklists of the World. Of these, 77 are rare or accidental and four have been introduced. None are endemic to the country.

This list is presented in the taxonomic sequence of the Check-list of North American Birds, 7th edition through the 59th Supplement, published by the American Ornithological Society (AOS). Common and scientific names are also those of the Check-list.

Unless otherwise noted, the species on this list are considered to occur regularly in Belize as permanent residents, summer or winter visitors, or migrants. The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The tags and notes of population status are from Bird Checklists of the World.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Belize

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Belize as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

List of birds of Colombia

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Colombia. The avifauna of Colombia has 1851 confirmed species, of which 81 are endemic, three have been introduced by humans, and 62 are rare or vagrants. One of the endemic species is believed to be extinct. An additional 37 species are hypothetical (see below).

Except as an entry is noted otherwise, the list of species is that of the South American Classification Committee (SACC) of the American Ornithological Society. The Colombian province of San Andrés and Providencia is much closer to Nicaragua than to the South American mainland, so the SACC does not address records there. An additional 17 species are listed here whose only Colombian records are from that province. Three of them are also considered hypothetical.The list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families, and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) are also those of the SACC.The following tags have been used to highlight several categories.

(V) Vagrant - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Colombia

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to Colombia

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Colombia as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

(H) Hypothetical - a species recorded but with "no tangible evidence" according to the SACC

(SA) San Andrés - a species whose only Colombian records are from the province of San Andrés and Providencia

List of birds of Mexico

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Mexico. The avifauna of Mexico included a total of 1118 species as of February 2018, according to Bird Checklists of the World. Of these species, 87 are rare or accidental, 10 have been introduced by humans, 108 are endemic, and five more breed only in Mexico though their non-breeding range is larger. Four species are known to be extinct, 65 are globally vulnerable or endangered, and three of the latter might also be extinct. The total figure includes a number of species which are known only from sight records; they are listed but not especially noted. An additional endemic species was named in July 2018, so it is not in the above counts.

This list is presented in the taxonomic sequence of the Check-list of North American Birds, 7th edition through the 59th Supplement, published by the American Ornithological Society (AOS). Common and scientific names are also those of the Check-list.

Unless otherwise noted, the species on this list are considered to occur regularly in Mexico as permanent residents, summer or winter visitors, or migrants. The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The tags and notes of population status are from Bird Checklists of the World.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Mexico

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to Mexico

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Mexico as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

List of birds of Nicaragua

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Nicaragua. The avifauna of Nicaragua included a total of 781 species as of December 2017, according to Bird Checklists of the World. Of the species, 55 are rare or accidental and five have been introduced by humans. None are endemic.

This list is presented in the taxonomic sequence of the Check-list of North American Birds, 7th edition through the 59th Supplement, published by the American Ornithological Society (AOS). Common and scientific names are also those of the Check-list.

Unless otherwise noted, the species on this list are considered to occur regularly in Nicaragua as permanent residents, summer or winter visitors, or migrants. The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The tags and notes of population status are from Bird Checklists of the World.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Nicaragua

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Nicaragua as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

List of birds of North America (Passeriformes)

The birds listed below all belong to the biological order Passeriformes, and are native to North America.

List of vulnerable birds

As of May 2019, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) lists 799 vulnerable avian species. 7.1% of all evaluated avian species are listed as vulnerable.

No subpopulations of birds have been evaluated by the IUCN.

For a species to be assessed as vulnerable to extinction the best available evidence must meet quantitative criteria set by the IUCN designed to reflect "a high risk of extinction in the wild". Endangered and critically endangered species also meet the quantitative criteria of vulnerable species, and are listed separately. See: List of endangered birds, List of critically endangered birds. Vulnerable, endangered and critically endangered species are collectively referred to as threatened species by the IUCN.

Additionally 61 avian species (0.59% of those evaluated) are listed as data deficient, meaning there is insufficient information for a full assessment of conservation status. As these species typically have small distributions and/or populations, they are intrinsically likely to be threatened, according to the IUCN. While the category of data deficient indicates that no assessment of extinction risk has been made for the taxa, the IUCN notes that it may be appropriate to give them "the same degree of attention as threatened taxa, at least until their status can be assessed."This is a complete list of vulnerable avian species evaluated by the IUCN. Where possible common names for taxa are given while links point to the scientific name used by the IUCN.

Northern royal flycatcher

The northern royal flycatcher (Onychorhynchus mexicanus) is a passerine bird in the family Tityridae. It is found in Mexico, south through most of Central America, to north-western Colombia and far western Venezuela.

Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.

O. occidentalis

O. occidentalis may refer to:

Onychorhynchus occidentalis, the Pacific royal flycatcher, a bird species found in Ecuador and Peru

Osmorhiza occidentalis, the western sweetroot, a flowering plant species native to much of western North America

Pacific Equatorial Forest

The Pacific Equatorial Forest is a tropical forest ecosystem located at 0° latitude in coastal Ecuador, in the province of ifrit ecosystem is most notable for its high diversity of forest types unusually close in proximity. Tropical rainforest, moist evergreen forest, premontane cloud forest, and tropical deciduous forest can all be encountered over the course of a one-day hike, and the change from one type of forest to another can occur in as little as 100 meters.

The Pacific Equatorial Forests, along with the rest of the coastal forests of Ecuador, is considered the most threatened tropical forest in the world and is part of the Tumbes-Chocó-Magdalena biodiversity hotspot. As much as 98% of coastal tropical forest have already been lost in Ecuador, almost all occurring during the last three generations. The Pacific Equatorial Forest, in particular, represents the greatest concentration of unprotected forest in coastal Ecuador and has been designated by several international conservation organizations as a global conservation priority.

Pacific royal flycatcher

The Pacific royal flycatcher (Onychorhynchus occidentalis) is a species of passerine bird in the family Tityridae. It is found in relatively dry forest and woodland in western Ecuador and far north-western Peru. It is threatened by habitat loss.

Sibley-Monroe checklist 10

The Sibley-Monroe checklist was a landmark document in the study of birds. It drew on extensive DNA-DNA hybridisation studies to reassess the relationships between modern birds.

Tityridae

Tityridae is family of suboscine passerine birds found in forest and woodland in the Neotropics. The 45 species in this family were formerly spread over the families Tyrannidae, Pipridae and Cotingidae (see Taxonomy). As yet, no widely accepted common name exists for the family, although tityras and allies and tityras, mourners and allies have been used. They are small to medium-sized birds. Under current classification, the family ranges in size from the buff-throated purpletuft, at 9.5 cm (3.7 in) and 10 grams (0.35 ounces), to the masked tityra, at up to 24 cm (9.5 in) and 88 grams (3.1 ounces). Most have relatively short tails and large heads.

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