Royal Spanish Football Federation

The Royal Spanish Football Federation (Spanish: Real Federación Española de Fútbol; RFEF) is the governing body of football in Spain. It is based in La Ciudad del Fútbol of Las Rozas, a municipality near Madrid. It was founded on 14 October 1909 as Federación Española de Clubs de Football,[1] and officially founded on 29 September 1913.[2]

It administers the competition committee (including the handling of the trophy) of the Campeonato Nacional de Liga: the Primera División and the Segunda División, even though they are organized by LaLiga. It organizes the Segunda División B as well as the Tercera División with the assistance of the regional football federations.

It is also responsible for appointing the management of the Spanish national football team (men's), women's, and youth national football teams. The Spain national futsal team, also belongs to the federation. As of May 2019, the federation has 21,148 registered clubs and 1,063,090 federated football players.[3]

Royal Spanish Football Federation
UEFA
RFEF logo
Founded14 October 1909 (as Federación Española de Clubs de Football)
29 September 1913
HeadquartersMadrid
FIFA affiliation1904
UEFA affiliation1954
PresidentLuis Rubiales
Websiterfef.es

Competitions

The RFEF also organizes several competitions:

Honours

National football team

Men

  • Runner-up (1): 2013
  • Third place (1): 2009

Women

  • Fourth place (1): 1997

National youth teams

Men

Women

National futsal team

Men

Women

Territories

The RFEF consists of 19 regional and territorial federations, comprising the different Autonomous communities and cities in Spain.

Presidents

President Years in power
Francisco García 1913–1916
Gabriel Maura 1916–1920
David Ormaechea 1921–1923
Gabriel Maura 1923–1924
Julián Olave 1924–1926
Antonio Bernabéu 1926–1927
Pedro Díez de Rivera (Marqués de Someruelos) 1927–1931
Leopoldo García 1931–1936
Julián Troncoso 1939–1940
Luis Saura 1940–1941
Javier Barroso 1941–1946
Jesús Rivero 1946–1947
Armando Muñoz 1947–1950
Manuel Valdés 1950–1952
Sancho Dávila 1952–1954
Juan Touzón 1954–1956
Alfonso de la Fuente 1956–1960
Benito Pico 1960–1967
José Luis Costa 1967–1970
José Luis Pérez-Paya 1970–1975
Pablo Porta 1975–1984
José Luis Roca 1984–1988
Ángel María Villar 1988–2017
Juan Luis Larrea 2017–2018
Luis Rubiales 2018–

References

  1. ^ EFE (7 March 2010). "Le quiere quitar cuatro títulos históricos al Madrid y uno al Barcelona". Marca (in Spanish). Retrieved 4 December 2010.
  2. ^ "Adidas presentó la nueva equipación de España". Real Federación Española de Fútbol (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 8 March 2012. Retrieved 4 December 2010.
  3. ^ Ministry of Culture and Sport (May 2019). "Yearbook of Sports Statistics 2019" (PDF). www.culturaydeporte.gob.es. pp. 112 and 122. templatestyles stripmarker in |author= at position 1 (help)

External links

1903 Copa del Rey Final

The 1903 Copa del Rey Final was the first final of the Copa del Rey, the Spanish football cup competition. The match took place on 8 April 1903 at the Hipódromo, Madrid. The match was contested by Athletic Bilbao and Madrid CF.

Athletic Bilbao lifted the trophy for the first time with a 3–2 victory over Madrid CF. Athletic Bilbao claims this trophy to be their second in a row, although the Royal Spanish Football Federation don't recognize the previous tournament as official.

This match has been identified as a catalyst for the establishment a few weeks later of what would eventually become Club Atlético de Madrid, after some Madrid-based Basque students among the spectators were inspired by the comeback victory by Athletic Bilbao and decided to form a local branch of the club.

1910 Copa del Rey

The Copa del Rey 1910 were two different competitions held the same year.

Due to disagreements between the reigning champion of the tournament, Club Ciclista de San Sebastián, and some of the clubs invited, in 1910 two parallel competitions were held: an "official", organized by the newly created FEF (Federación Española de Fútbol) later Royal Spanish Football Federation (Spanish: Real Federación Española de Fútbol, RFEF), in Madrid and an "unofficial", organized by the UECF (Unión Española de Clubes de Fútbol), in San Sebastián. Both are currently recognized as official by the RFEF.

1910 Copa del Rey Final

The 1910 Copa del Rey Final was the 8th final and 9th final of the Spanish cup competition, the Copa del Rey.

This edition of cup had 2 finals, due to disagreements between the reigning champion of the tournament, Club Ciclista de San Sebastián, and some of the clubs invited.

Two parallel competitions were held: an "official", organized by the newly created FEF (Federación Española de Fútbol) later Royal Spanish Football Federation (Spanish: Real Federación Española de Fútbol, RFEF), in Madrid and an "unofficial", organized by the UECF (Unión Española de Clubes de Fútbol), in San Sebastián. Both are currently recognized as official by the RFEF.

1913 Copa del Rey

The 1913 Copa del Rey were two different competitions held the same year.

Due to disagreements between the Royal Spanish Football Federation (Spanish: Real Federación Española de Fútbol, RFEF) and some clubs, in 1913 two parallel competitions were held: an "official", organized by the FEF (Federación Española de Fútbol), in Madrid and an "unofficial", organized by the UECF (Unión Española de Clubes de Fútbol), in Barcelona. Both are currently recognized as official by the RFEF.

1914 Copa del Rey

The Copa del Rey 1914 was the 14th staging of the Copa del Rey, the Spanish football cup competition.

The Royal Spanish Football Federation took complete control of the cup tournament and decided that the clubs of the existing regional championship would qualify for the national cup championship; no free entry would be permitted anymore. Apart from some exception, the elimination rounds were played in two matches (home and away) from this season onwards. The competition started on March 29, 1914, and concluded on May 10, 1914, with the Final, held at the Estadio de Costorbe in Irun, in which Athletic Bilbao lifted the trophy for the 5th time ever with a 2–1 victory over España de Barcelona.

Copa Eva Duarte

The Copa Eva Duarte was a Spanish football tournament organized by the Royal Spanish Football Federation (RFEF) and contested by the winners of La Liga and the Copa del Generalísimo. In 1940, it had the name of Copa de Campeones, and was not played again until 1945, when the ambassador of Argentina, due to the good relations with the military government, offered a trophy called "Copa de Oro Argentina". Both these tournaments were unofficial.

In 1941 the "Copa Presidente FEF" was established as an official tournament founded and organized by the RFEF.

In 1947 the "Copa Eva Duarte de Perón" was established as an annual and official tournament founded and organized by the RFEF, as a tribute to Argentine president Juan Perón and his wife Eva Perón. It was played between September and December, usually as one-match finals. The trophy was the predecessor of the current Supercopa de España, first held in 1982.

Galician Football Federation

The Galician Football Federation (Galician: Real Federación Galega de Fútbol, Spanish: Real Federación Gallega de Fútbol, RFGF) is the governing body of the sport of football in Galicia, Spain.

The RFGF organises Group 1 of the Tercera División, with the assistance of the Royal Spanish Football Federation (RFEF), as part of the Spanish football league system. It also organises the Copa Galiza and regional divisions of Galicia independently from the Royal Spanish Football Federation.

The RFGF, which also administered the Championship of Galicia (a regional league competition whose best teams qualified for the Copa del Rey) until the end of the 1930s, was founded in 1909 and is based in A Coruña.

Joan Gaspart

Joan Gaspart Solves (Catalan pronunciation: [ʒuˈaŋ ɡəsˈpaɾt]; born 11 October 1944) is a Spanish businessman and a former FC Barcelona president between July 2000 and February 2003. He was born in Barcelona. He is known as one of the best vice presidents of the club (during the presidency of Josep Lluís Nuñez) but one of the worst presidents. Gaspart spent all the money taken from the sale of Luís Figo to Real Madrid, buying Emmanuel Petit and Marc Overmars from Arsenal and Gerard from Valencia.

Gaspart stepped down as President of FC Barcelona in 2003 after some atrocious results for the club's football team.

Currently he is president of the football club UE Sant Andreu from Barcelona and President of the Royal Spanish Football Federation (Real Federación Española de Fútbol, RFEF), and was responsible for Mr. Ángel María Villar electoral campaign. Mr. Villar is currently President of the Royal Spanish Football Federation, and Vice President of both UEFA and FIFA.

LNFS

The Liga Nacional de Fútbol Sala (LNFS) (National Futsal League) is the governing body that runs the major professional futsal leagues in Spain. It was founded in 1989 and serves under the authority of the Royal Spanish Football Federation.

La Ciudad del Fútbol

Officially La Ciudad del Fútbol de la Real Federación Española de Fútbol (English: The Football City of the Royal Spanish Football Federation) is a football training facility opened in 2003, serving as the headquarters of the Royal Spanish Football Federation as well as the official training centre of the Spanish football team. It is located in the municipality of Las Rozas de Madrid around 20 km northwest of the capital Madrid, within the Community of Madrid.

Spain national under-15 football team

The Spain national under-15 football team is the national team that represents Spain and the Royal Spanish Football Federation under this age level. It is currently the youngest feeder for the national team and competes in such tournaments as the Under-15 Nations Cup, a competition that is seen as an attempt in creating an Under-15 FIFA World Cup in the near future.

As FIFA plan in making a World Cup tournament for players under the age of 15 soon, the Spanish national team returned from a five-year hiatus, (the last time the team played was in 2007 when they were crowned champions in the Torneo Villa de Santiago del Teide for the fifth consecutive time) to participate in a tournament that was hosted by Mexico in June 2012, the Nations Cup.

Spain national under-16 football team

Spain's national under-16 football team represents Spain in international football for children under 16 and is controlled by the Royal Spanish Football Federation, which is the governing body for football in Spain.

Spain national under-17 football team

The Spain national under-17 football team represents Spain in international football at this age level and is controlled by Royal Spanish Football Federation, the governing body for football in Spain.

Considered one of the strongest national team in under 17 level, Spain has participated in 9 out of 14 World Cup tournaments. Spain hold the record of playing the most finals without ever winning the tournament, having finished as runners-up on four occasions.

Spain national under-18 football team

The Spain national under-18 football team represents Spain in international football at this age level and is controlled by Royal Spanish Football Federation, the governing body for football in Spain.

Spain national under-19 football team

The Spain national under-19 football team represents Spain in international football at this age level and is controlled by Royal Spanish Football Federation, the governing body for football in Spain.

Spain national under-20 football team

The Spain national under-20 football team represents Spain in international football at this age level and is controlled by Royal Spanish Football Federation (RFEF), the governing body for football in Spain.

Spain national under-21 football team

The Spain national under-21 football team is the national under-21 football team of Spain and is controlled by the Royal Spanish Football Federation. The team, nicknamed La Rojita (The Little Red [One]), competes in the biennial UEFA European Under-21 Championship.

Following the realignment of UEFA's youth competitions in 1976, the Spanish under-21 team was formed. Spain has a fantastic record (competition winners five times and runners-up twice); having consecutively won the 2011 and 2013 Championships. They hold the joint record with Italy for the most wins of the competition.

Since the under-21 competition rules insist that players must be 21 or under at the start of a two-year competition, technically it is an U-23 competition. For this reason, Spain's brief record in the preceding U-23 competitions is also shown, though in actuality, Spain played only three competitive U-23 matches. The first was in the "under-23 Challenge", which they lost, while the next two were in a two-team qualification "group" for the 1972 competition (facing the Soviet Union team, they lost 2–1 at home then drew 1–1 away and failed to qualify. Spain did not enter a team in the other two U-23 competitions, but have been ever present in under-21 competitions).

Spain's youth development programs has been challenging the South American dominance in the FIFA U-17 World Championship and the FIFA U-20 World Cup. In fact, 20 of the Spanish 23-man squad that won the Euro 2008 came through the ranks of the youth teams; most of them had won titles at the youth level as well. Most important club which delivered the team's players for this tournament was FC Twente from the Netherlands.

Spain women's national futsal team

The Spain women's national futsal team represents Spain in international futsal competitions and is controlled by the Royal Spanish Football Federation.

Spain women's national under-20 football team

The Spain women's national under-20 football team represents Spain in international football in under-20 categories and is controlled by the Royal Spanish Football Federation.

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