Roy Weatherly

Cyril Roy Weatherly (February 25, 1915 – January 19, 1991), nicknamed "Stormy", was an American professional baseball player whose career extended for two decades (1934–1943; 1946–1954; 1958). The native of Tyler County, Texas, an outfielder, appeared in 811 Major League games over ten seasons for the Cleveland Indians, New York Yankees and New York Giants. Weatherly batted left-handed and threw right-handed. Despite his relatively small size — he stood 5 ft 6½ in (1.69 m) tall and weighed 173 pounds (78 kg) — he hit more than 100 home runs in minor league baseball.

As a Major Leaguer, Weatherly collected 794 hits, with 152 doubles, 44 triples, and 43 home runs. His finest season was 1940, when he batted .303 with career highs in runs scored, hits, doubles, triples, home runs, and runs batted in for the contending Indians, finishing eleventh in the American League Most Valuable Player voting. Traded to the Yankees after the 1942 season, he appeared in one game as a pinch hitter during the 1943 World Series, popping out in the eighth inning of Game 2 against Mort Cooper of the St. Louis Cardinals.[1] Although the Yankees lost that game, that was the only contest they would drop as they won the Series in five games.

Weatherly missed the 1944 and 1945 seasons while serving in the United States Army during World War II.[2]

Roy Weatherly
Roy Weatherly 1940 Play Ball card.jpeg
Outfielder
Born: February 25, 1915
Warren, Tyler County, Texas
Died: January 19, 1991 (aged 75)
Woodville, Texas
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
June 27, 1936, for the Cleveland Indians
Last MLB appearance
October 1, 1950, for the New York Giants
MLB statistics
Batting average.286
Home runs43
Runs batted in290
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Popular culture

In the Black Sheep Squadron episode "The Hawk Flies on Sunday," an episode about the shooting down of Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto on April 18, 1943, a member of Marine fighter pilot squadron VMF-214 (the "Black Sheep") is portrayed listening to a Red Sox/Yankees game in which the Red Sox led 3-2 until the bottom of the ninth, when Roy Weatherly hits a two-run walk-off home run. The event is fictional. Weatherly did hit a walk-off two run home run against the Red Sox in 1943, but it occurred during the first game in a doubleheader played on August 29, 1943 in the bottom of the tenth, breaking a 4-4 tie and giving the Yankees a 6-4 win.

References

  1. ^ Retrosheet
  2. ^ Baseball in Wartime web site

External links

1915 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1915 throughout the world.

1936 Cleveland Indians season

The 1936 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the American League with a record of 80–74, 22½ games behind the New York Yankees.

1937 Cleveland Indians season

The 1937 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record of 83–71, 19 games behind the New York Yankees.

1938 Cleveland Indians season

The 1938 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the American League with a record of 86–66, 13 games behind the New York Yankees.

1939 Cleveland Indians season

The 1939 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the American League with a record of 86–66, 13 games behind the New York Yankees.

1940 Cleveland Indians season

The 1940 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American major league baseball. The team finished second in the American League with a record of 89–65, one game behind the Detroit Tigers. Had the Indians finished ahead of the Tigers, The Indians would have played their cross state National League rivals, the National League Champion Cincinnati Reds, in the World Series. The World Series would have been the only all Ohio World series. The season is infamous for ten Indian players confronting owner Alva Bradley and demanding the removal of manager Ossie Vitt, saying the man's behavior was harming the team. When the news broke, the public sided with Vitt and the Indians were dismissed as "crybabies." The movement has since been named the "Crybaby Mutiny."

1940 Detroit Tigers season

The 1940 Detroit Tigers season was their 40th since they entered the American League in 1901. The team won the American League pennant with a record of 90–64, finishing just one game ahead of the Cleveland Indians and just two games ahead of the New York Yankees. It was the sixth American League pennant for the Tigers. The team went on to lose the 1940 World Series to the Cincinnati Reds 4 games to 3.

1941 Play Ball Cards

The Play Ball baseball card sets, issued by Gum Inc. from 1939 to 1941, are sets filled with various rookies, stars, and Hall of Famers. The 1941 set has a total of 72 cards. The more valuable cards in the set include Ted Williams ($1500), Joe DiMaggio ($2500), and the rookie Pee Wee Reese ($400–$600). Any Play Ball cards are relatively rare, and if highly graded the cards demand a premium. The 1941 Play Ball set is the only Play Ball set with color.

1943 New York Yankees season

The 1943 New York Yankees season was the team's 41st season in New York, and its 43rd season overall. The team finished with a record of 98–56, winning their 14th pennant, finishing 13.5 games ahead of the Washington Senators. Managed by Joe McCarthy, the Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the St. Louis Cardinals in 5 games.

1946 New York Yankees season

The 1946 New York Yankees season was the team's 44th season in New York, and its 46th overall. The team finished with a record of 87–67, finishing 17 games behind the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy, Bill Dickey, and Johnny Neun. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1950 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1950 New York Giants season was the franchise's 68th season. The team finished in third place in the National League with an 86-68 record, 5 games behind the Philadelphia Phillies.

1991 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1991 throughout the world.

Cleveland Indians all-time roster

The following is a list of players, both past and current, who appeared in at least one game for the Cleveland American League franchise known as the Blues (1901), Bronchos (1902), Naps (1903–14) and Indians (1915–present).

Players in Bold are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Players in Italics have had their numbers retired by the team.

List current as of the 2015 season

Mandak League

The Manitoba-Dakota League was an independent baseball league based in North Dakota and Manitoba that was founded in 1950. It became the home for many African-American and Latino players. The league lasted through the 1957 season. It was known informally as the Mandak League or Man-Dak League.

It was the outlet for former Negro Leaguers to continue playing and entertaining fans, occupying fields with ex-major leaguers, minor league stars and some of the best Manitoba, North Dakota,and Minnesota born players. It featured such greats as Willie Wells, Leon Day, Ray Dandridge and Satchel Paige, who pitched briefly for the Minot Mallards in 1950.

San Francisco Giants all-time roster

This is a list of players, both past and present, who appeared at least in one game for the New York Giants or the San Francisco Giants.

Players in Bold are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Players in Italics have had their numbers retired by the team.

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