Roy Kramer

Roy F. Kramer (born c. 1930) is a former American high school and college football coach and athletics administrator. Kramer was the head football coach for Central Michigan University from 1967 to 1977, compiling a record of 83–32–2 and winning the 1974 NCAA Division II Football Championship. He then served as the athletic director at Vanderbilt University from 1978 to 1990, and later as the commissioner of the Southeastern Conference from 1990 to 2002, where he created the Bowl Championship Series.[1]

Roy Kramer
Biographical details
Bornc. 1930
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1955Battle Creek Central HS (MI) (assistant)
1956Hudson HS (MI)
1957Dowagiac HS (MI)
1958–1959Benton Harbor HS (MI)
1960–1966East Lansing HS (MI)
1967–1977Central Michigan
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1978–1990Vanderbilt
1990–2002SEC (commissioner)
Head coaching record
Overall83–32–2 (college)
58–14–3 (high school)

Administrative career

Kramer became the sixth commissioner of the Southeastern Conference on January 10, 1990. Within seven months of his appointment, the conference announced plans for expansion, adding Arkansas and South Carolina officially on July 1, 1991. Following expansion, Kramer guided the conference in formulating divisional play and the first Division I-A conference football championship game.

During his tenure at the helm of the SEC, the conference won 81 national championships, the most ever in a decade by the league. Kramer oversaw the distribution of a then-league record $95.7 million to its member institutions for 2001–02. Kramer negotiated multi-sport national television packages with CBS and ESPN, featuring football and men's and women's basketball, through the 2008–09 season.

Because of his influence, the Men's and Women's SEC Athlete of the year award is presented annually as the Roy F. Kramer Award.

Kramer was succeeded as the SEC's commissioner by Michael Slive.

Awards and honors

Head coaching record

College

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Central Michigan Chippewas (Interstate Intercollegiate Athletic Conference) (1967–1969)
1967 Central Michigan 8–2 2–1 1st
1968 Central Michigan 7–2 2–1 1st
1969 Central Michigan 7–3 2–1 2nd
Central Michigan Chippewas (NCAA College Division / Division II independent) (1970–1974)
1970 Central Michigan 7–3
1971 Central Michigan 5–5
1972 Central Michigan 5–5–1
1973 Central Michigan 7–4
1974 Central Michigan 12–1 W NCAA Division II Championship
Central Michigan Chippewas (Mid-American Conference) (1975–1977)
1975 Central Michigan 8–2–1 4–1–1 2nd
1976 Central Michigan 7–4 4–3 T–5th
1977 Central Michigan 10–1 7–1 2nd
Central Michigan: 83–32–2 21–8–1
Total: 83–32–2
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title or championship game berth

References

  1. ^ Jack Carey (December 8, 2007). "Man behind creation of BCS pleased with results". USA Today. Retrieved February 18, 2008.
  2. ^ a b c "CMUCHIPPEWAS.COM Roy Kramer Bio - Official Athletic Site". www.cmuchippewas.com. Retrieved June 5, 2018.
  3. ^ "Roy Kramer «  Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame". tshf.net. Retrieved June 5, 2018.
  4. ^ "Roy Kramer". Alabama Sports Hall of Fame. Retrieved June 5, 2018.
  5. ^ Cowan, Kevin (January 13, 2008). "Attorney's new home christened in festive fashion". Knoxville News Sentinel. pp. http://www.knoxnews.com/news/2008/Jan/13/attorneys-new-home-christened-in-festive-fashion/.
  6. ^ "Vanderbilt Athletics Announces Inaugural Hall of Fame Class". Vanderbilt University. June 26, 2008. Retrieved June 26, 2008.
  7. ^ "2011 College Football Award Winners". ESPN.com. Retrieved June 5, 2018.
  8. ^ a b "Roy Kramer". East Lansing High School Hall of Fame. Retrieved June 5, 2018.
  9. ^ "Don't Miss the 2013 Duffy Daugherty Memorial Award Dinner Thursday! This Year's Winner is: Roy Kramer! | Spartan Nation". www.spartannation.com. Retrieved June 5, 2018.

External links

1967 Central Michigan Chippewas football team

The 1967 Central Michigan Chippewas football team represented Central Michigan University in the Interstate Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (IIAC) during the 1967 NCAA College Division football season. In their first season under head coach Roy Kramer, the Chippewas compiled an 8–2 record (2–1 against IIAC opponents), tied for the IIAC championship, held five of their ten opponents to fewer than seven points, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 207 to 84.The team's statistical leaders included quarterback Gene Gilin with 611 passing yards, tailback Craig Tefft with 1,046 rushing yards, and end Greg Hoefler with 292 receiving yards. Fullback Wally Hempton received the team's most valuable player award. Ten Central Michigan players (Tefft, Hoefler, Hempton, backs Chuck Barker and Bruce Cameron, defensive ends Bucky Colton and Mark Maksimovicz, guard Al McNeal, and tackles Ralph Sarnowski and Raleigh Smith) received first-team honors on the All-IIAC team.Bill Kelly retired as Central Michigan's head football coach at the end of the 1966 season after 16 years in the position. Roy Kramer, who had served as Central's freshman football coach in 1966, was hired to replace him.

1968 Central Michigan Chippewas football team

The 1968 Central Michigan Chippewas football team represented Central Michigan University in the Interstate Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (IIAC) during the 1968 NCAA College Division football season. In their second season under head coach Roy Kramer, the Chippewas compiled a 7–2 record (2–1 against IIAC opponents), tied for the IIAC championship and outscored their opponents, 256 to 132. The team's statistical leaders included quarterback Bob Miles with 918 passing yards, tailback Craig Tefft with 1,126 rushing yards, and Dave Lemere with 325 receiving yards. Tefft received the team's most valuable player award. Seven Central Michigan players (Tefft, defensive end Bucky Colton, guard Fred Ferguson, linebacker Steve Lockman, defensive back Bob Markey, tackle Mike Post, and offensive tackle Ralph Sarnowski) received first-team honors on the All-IIAC team.

1969 Central Michigan Chippewas football team

The 1969 Central Michigan Chippewas football team represented Central Michigan University in the Interstate Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (IIAC) during the 1969 NCAA College Division football season. In their third season under head coach Roy Kramer, the Chippewas compiled a 7–3 record (2–1 against IIAC opponents) and outscored their opponents, 254 to 147. The team's statistical leaders included quarterback Bob Miles with 305 passing yards, tailback Jesse Lakes with 1,263 rushing yards, and Dave Lemere with 239 receiving yards. On September 27, 1969, Lakes set a school record, rushing for 343 yards (and also scored five touchdowns) in a 41-6 victory over Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Lakes broke Jim Podoley's record of 254 yards set in 1954. Lakes' record was broken in 1994 by Brian Pruitt. Tight end Dave Farris received the team's most valuable player award. Nine Central Michigan players (Lakes, Farris, defensive tackle Ralph Burde, guard Fred Ferguson, linebackers Tom Hahnenberg and Bump Lardie, defensive back Bob Markey, and tackles Mike Post and Jim Prisk) received first-team honors on the All-IIAC team.

1970 Central Michigan Chippewas football team

The 1970 Central Michigan Chippewas football team represented Central Michigan University during the 1970 NCAA College Division football season. In their fourth season under head coach Roy Kramer, the Chippewas compiled a 7–3 record and outscored their opponents, 263 to 190. The team's statistical leaders included quarterback Mick Brzezinski with 775 passing yards, tailback Jesse Lakes with 1,296 rushing yards, and Rick Groth with 451 receiving yards. Lakes received the team's most valuable player award for the first of two consecutive years.

1971 Central Michigan Chippewas football team

The 1971 Central Michigan Chippewas football team represented Central Michigan University during the 1971 NCAA College Division football season. In their fifth season under head coach Roy Kramer, the Chippewas compiled a 5–5 record and outscored their opponents, 183 to 181. The team's statistical leaders included quarterback Mick Brzezinski with 426 passing yards, tailback Jesse Lakes with 1,143 rushing yards, and Ron Goodin with 186 receiving yards. Lakes received the team's most valuable player award for the second consecutive year.

1972 Central Michigan Chippewas football team

The 1972 Central Michigan Chippewas football team represented Central Michigan University during the 1972 NCAA College Division football season. In their sixth season under head coach Roy Kramer, the Chippewas compiled a 5–5–1 record and outscored their opponents, 265 to 190.On November 4, 1972, the team played its first game at its new stadium, R. Perry Shorts Stadium. The dedication game drew a crowd of 17,000. The new facility was built at a cost of $2 million and had a seating capacity of 19,875. The Chippewas defeated Illinois State, 28-21, in the dedication game.The team's statistical leaders included quarterback Gary Bevington with 834 passing yards, tailback Chuck Markey with 1,513 rushing yards, and Matt Means with 603 receiving yards. Markey received the team's most valuable player award. Means set a school record with 10 receptions in a 34-0 victory over Indiana State on September 30, 1972.

1973 Central Michigan Chippewas football team

The 1973 Central Michigan Chippewas football team represented Central Michigan University during the 1973 NCAA Division II football season. In their seventh season under head coach Roy Kramer, the Chippewas compiled a 7–4 record and outscored their opponents, 197 to 151. The team played its home games in Perry Shorts Stadium in Mount Pleasant, Michigan, with attendance of 78,547 in five home games.The team's statistical leaders included quarterback Mike Franckowiak with 655 passing yards, running back Jim Sandy with 1,168 rushing yards, and Matt Means with 553 receiving yards. Sandy received the team's most valuable player award. George Duranko set a school record with a 100-yard interception return against Eastern Michigan on November 10, 1973.

1974 Central Michigan Chippewas football team

The 1974 Central Michigan Chippewas football team was an American football team that represented Central Michigan University during the 1974 NCAA Division II football season. In their eighth season under head coach Roy Kramer, the Chippewas compiled a 12–1 record, losing the opening game to Kent State and then winning 12 straight games.In postseason play, they defeated Boise State 20–6 at Perry Shorts Stadium in a Division II quarterfinal, Louisiana Tech 35–14 in the Pioneer Bowl (semifinal) in Texas, and Delaware 54–14 in the Camellia Bowl to win the Division II championship. The team was also later voted number one in the AP's "College Division" poll.The 1974 Chippewas held 11 of their 13 opponents to 14 or fewer points and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 450 to 127. The team played its home games in Perry Shorts Stadium in Mount Pleasant, Michigan, with attendance of 93,236 in six home games.The team's statistical leaders included quarterback Mike Franckowiak with 1,262 passing yards (81 of 149 passing), running back Walt Hodges with 1,463 rushing yards (251 carries), and Matt Means with 848 receiving yards (55 receptions). Hodges' 1,463 rushing yards was a Central Michigan record at that time. Franckowiak received the team's most valuable player award.After the 1974 season, Central Michigan jumped to Division I and joined the Mid-American Conference. In 2004, the 1974 team was inducted as a group into the Central Michigan University Hall of Fame.

1975 Central Michigan Chippewas football team

The 1975 Central Michigan Chippewas football team represented Central Michigan University in the Mid-American Conference (MAC) during the 1975 NCAA Division I football season. In their ninth season under head coach Roy Kramer, the Chippewas compiled an 8–2–1 record (4–1–1 against MAC opponents), finished in second place in the MAC standings, held eight of eleven opponents to fewer than 10 points, and outscored all opponents, 309 to 102. The team played its home games in Perry Shorts Stadium in Mount Pleasant, Michigan, with attendance of 105,600 in six home games.Central Michigan made its debut at the NCAA Division I level during the 1975 season, having won the NCAA Division II Football Championship in 1974. The 1975 season was also the program's first as a member of the MAC. On September 6, 1975, the Chippewas defeated Western Michigan, 34–0, in their Division I and MAC debuts. The game was played before a record crowd of 20,800 at Perry Shorts Stadium. Central Michigan running back Walt "Smoke" Hodges rushed for 147 yards.The team's two losses came in close games against Northern Michigan (16–17) and Ball State (13–16). The team also played Ohio to a 6–6 tie. The team did not play a game against MAC champion Miami (OH).

The team's statistical leaders included quarterback Ron Rummel with 586 passing yards, running back Walt Hodges with 1,025 rushing yards, and John Fossen with 211 receiving yards. Center Wes Gamble received the team's most valuable player award. Running back Walt Hodges, defensive back Jim Jones, defensive tackle John Neuman, and linebacker Bill Schmidt received first-team All-MAC honors.

1976 Central Michigan Chippewas football team

The 1976 Central Michigan Chippewas football team represented Central Michigan University in the Mid-American Conference (MAC) during the 1976 NCAA Division I football season. In their tenth season under head coach Roy Kramer, the Chippewas compiled a 7–4 record (4–3 against MAC opponents), finished in a tie for fourth place in the MAC standings, and outscored their opponents, 223 to 219. The team played its home games in Perry Shorts Stadium in Mount Pleasant, Michigan, with attendance of 91,345 in five home games.The team's statistical leaders included quarterback Ron Rummel with 761 passing yards, running back Mike Gray with 734 rushing yards, and tight end Wayne Schwalbach with 496 receiving yards. Offensive guard John Kloc and defensive tackle John Wunderlich were co-recipients of the team's most valuable player award. Wunderlich, Schwalbach, and defensive back Ed Rykulski received first-team All-MAC honors. Placekicker Rade Savich kicked 14 field goals, a school record that he broke in 1978.

1977 Central Michigan Chippewas football team

The 1977 Central Michigan Chippewas football team was an American football team that represented Central Michigan University during the 1977 NCAA Division I football season. In their eleventh and final season under head coach Roy Kramer, the Chippewas compiled a 10–1 record, finished in second place in the Mid-American Conference, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 317 to 155.The team's statistical leaders were quarterback Ron Rummel with 638 passing yards, tailback Mose Rison with 1,241 rushing yards, and Wayne Schwalbach with 426 receiving yards. Rison received the team's most valuable player award.Roy Kramer was the team's head coach. Herb Deromedi was the defensive coordinator. Dave Farris was the defensive line coach. Don Peddie was the offensive backs coach. Chris Allen was the offensive line coach. Jim Schulte was the defensive ends coach. Denny Swenson was the defensive secondary coach.

1978 Central Michigan Chippewas football team

The 1978 Central Michigan Chippewas football team represented Central Michigan University in the Mid-American Conference (MAC) during the 1978 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their first season under head coach Herb Deromedi, the Chippewas compiled a 9–2 record (8–1 against MAC opponents), finished in second place in the MAC standings, held seven of eleven opponents to fewer than ten points, and outscored all opponents, 331 to 119. The season marked the beginning of a school record 23-game unbeaten streak that ran from October 7, 1978, to October 11, 1980. The team played its home games in Perry Shorts Stadium in Mount Pleasant, Michigan, with attendance of 98,011 in five home games.The team's statistical leaders included quarterback Gary Hogeboom with 1,095 passing yards, Willie Todd with 746 rushing yards, and Brian Blank with 384 receiving yards. Linebacker Bryan Gross received the team's most valuable player award. Offensive guard Tim Sopha, placekicker Rade Savich, and defensive back Robert Jackson received first-team All-MAC honors. Savich broke the school record with 15 field goals in a season and tied a school record with 38 point after touchdown kicks in a season.Herb Deromedi, a native of Royal Oak, Michigan, was hired as Central Michigan's head football coach in August 1978. He had previously been the Chippewas' defensive coordinator under head coach Roy Kramer. He replaced Kramer, who left the program to become the athletic director at Vanderbilt University. Deromedi remained the program's head football coach for 16 years, compiling a 110–55–10 record. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2007.

1990 Southeastern Conference Baseball Tournament

The 1990 Southeastern Conference Baseball Tournament was held at the Hoover Metropolitan Stadium in Hoover, Alabama from May 17 through May 20. LSU and Mississippi State were declared co-champions the tournament as a result of a weather-cancelled championship game.

Central Michigan Chippewas football

The Central Michigan Chippewas are a college football program in Division I FBS, representing Central Michigan University (CMU). CMU currently has the 30th highest overall winning percentage of programs currently playing in NCAA Division I.The Chippewas have played in five bowl games in the last seven years, drawing 60,624 fans in the 2007 Motor City Bowl. CMU has played a total of eight post-season games (conference championships and bowl games), winning six. All have occurred in the past seven years.

Dick Flynn

Richard O. Flynn (born July 17, 1943) is a former American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Central Michigan University from 1994 to 1999, compiling a record of 30–37.

George Bodenheimer

George Bodenheimer (born May 6, 1958) is the former president of ESPN Inc. and of ABC's sports division, known since 2006 as ESPN on ABC. He was president of ESPN since November 19, 1998 and of the former ABC Sports since March 3, 2003.

The Sports Business Journal named Bodenheimer the most influential person of 2008 on a list of 50 people.As of January 1, 2012, Bodenheimer was the executive chairman of ESPN, with John Skipper replacing him as president. On December 18, 2017, he became acting chairman of ESPN after Skipper announced his resignation.

National Football Foundation Distinguished American Award

The National Football Foundation Distinguished American Award is among the highest offered by the National Football Foundation (NFF). Every year, the NFF & College Football Hall of Fame pays tribute to a select few with awards of excellence for exhibiting superior qualities of scholarship, citizenship and leadership. Additionally, the Foundation also recognizes individuals who demonstrate outstanding support for the NFF and its mission of promoting the game of amateur football. The Distinguished American Award is presented on special occasions when a truly deserving individual emerges, the award honors someone who has applied the character building attributes learned from amateur sport in their business and personal life, exhibiting superior leadership qualities in education, amateur athletics, business and in the community.

The recipient is not limited to a former college player or coach, must be an outstanding person who has maintained a lifetime of interest in the game and who, over a long period of time, has exhibited enviable leadership qualities and made a significant contribution to the betterment of amateur football in the United States.

Pete McCormick

Pete McCormick was the head coach of the Central Michigan college football program in 1896.

Roy Golden

Roy Kramer Golden (July 12, 1888 – October 4, 1961) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball. He played for the St. Louis Cardinals.

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