Rowridge transmitting station

The Rowridge transmitting station is a facility for FM radio and television transmission at Rowridge on the Isle of Wight in southern England.

It currently has a 172 metres (564 ft) tall guyed mast, owned and operated by Arqiva (previously National Grid Wireless). There is a smaller tower on the site belonging to British Telecom. Prior to Digital Switchover (DSO) the station broadcast with a power of 250 kW (ERP) for FM radio, 500 kW for analogue television, and 20 kW for digital television. In July 2007, Ofcom confirmed that Rowridge would remain an A Group transmitter at Digital switchover; the digital television transmission signal was then boosted to 200 kW. From March 2018 MUXES 7 & 8 moved out of the A group to channels 55 & 56, though these are due to be turned off between 2020 and 2022.

Rowridge is one of only two main transmitters (the other is the rather smaller transmitter of Rosneath in Scotland) to broadcast its output on both horizontal and vertical polarities. Only the main 6 MUXES are transmitted in vertical polarity. The reason for this dual polarity transmission is to give a second option to those experiencing co-channel interference from transmitters on the continent.

Analogue Channel 5 was not transmitted from Rowridge but was broadcast (at 10 kW) from Fawley Power Station, with the antenna located on the main chimney. Transmissions all fitted within the A group and were horizontally polarised. On 25 March 2009, Channel 5's analogue signal was turned off from Fawley Power Station, due to the digital switchover in the neighbouring Westcountry region.

Population coverage for the main four analogue channels was about 1.75 million.

Rowridge
Rowridge from entrance gate 200704270010
The Rowridge transmitting station
Rowridge transmitting station is located in Isle of Wight
Rowridge transmitting station
Rowridge transmitting station (Isle of Wight)
Mast height149.6 metres (491 ft)
Coordinates50°40′35″N 1°22′07″W / 50.676389°N 1.368611°WCoordinates: 50°40′35″N 1°22′07″W / 50.676389°N 1.368611°W
Grid referenceSZ447865
BBC regionBBC South
ITV regionSouthern (1969–1981)
TVS (1982–1992)
ITV Meridian (1993–present)
Local TV serviceThat's Solent

History

Rowridge mast, IW, UK

The station was first built to provide BBC 405-line television coverage for an area including Southampton, Portsmouth and Bournemouth, with Brighton, Winchester and Salisbury as desirable further targets. Sites on the mainland and the Isle of Wight were considered, and three were tested by BBC Research Department. A temporary 200 ft lattice mast was built with a main antenna at 175 ft and a reserve antenna lower down. These aerials were directional to enhance the signal northwards and reduce unwanted coverage to the south.[1]

The service opened on 12 November 1954, bringing television to the area for the first time.

A programme feed was obtained via a Post Office radio link, using refurbished equipment that provided the original picture feed for the Wenvoe Transmitter on the British Telecom Microwave Network. A site for this near Alton, Hampshire was acquired and named after a nearby pub: Golden Pot. Here the TV signal from Alexandra Palace was picked up and relayed via a one-hop 4 GHz microwave link to Rowridge. This was brought into service on 18 October 1954. Later, the microwave link ran from the Museum telephone exchange in London to Rowridge, using Golden Pot as an intermediate site.[2]

In 1965 the UHF antenna was added making the total height of the structure 149.6 metres (491 ft). This addition allowed Rowridge to radiate the PAL 625-line transmission that allowed broadcasts in colour and eventually stereo sound, using NICAM.

On 25 March 2009, Channel 5's analogue signal was turned off from Fawley Power Station. Later on in the day, "existing digital terrestrial TV services moved to new frequencies", due to the digital switchover happening in the region in 2012.[3]

Arqiva applied for planning permission to replace the existing 150m mast with one 187m high on 22 May 2009.[4]

Channels listed by frequency

Analogue radio

Frequency kW[5] Service
88.5 MHz 250 BBC Radio 2
90.7 MHz 250 BBC Radio 3
92.9 MHz 250 BBC Radio 4
96.1 MHz 10 BBC Radio Solent
98.2 MHz 250 BBC Radio 1
100.3 MHz 125 Classic FM

Digital radio

Frequency Block kW Operator
225.648 MHz 12B 5 BBC National DAB

Analogue television

12 November 1954 – 15 January 1966

Frequency VHF kW Service
56.75 MHz 3 100 BBC1

15 January 1966 – 13 December 1969

Frequency VHF UHF kW Service
56.75 MHz 3 100 BBC1
495.25 MHz 24 500 BBC2

13 December 1969 – 27 December 1969

Frequency VHF UHF kW Service
56.75 MHz 3 100 BBC1
495.25 MHz 24 500 BBC2
519.25 MHz 27 500 Southern

27 December 1969 – 4 December 1982

Frequency VHF UHF kW Service
56.75 MHz 3 100 BBC1
495.25 MHz 24 500 BBC2
519.25 MHz 27 500 TVS (Southern until 1982)
551.25 MHz 31 500 BBC1

4 December 1982 – 3 January 1985

Frequency VHF UHF kW Service
56.75 MHz 3 100 BBC1
471.25 MHz 21 500 Channel 4
495.25 MHz 24 500 BBC2
519.25 MHz 27 500 TVS
551.25 MHz 31 500 BBC1

3 January 1985 – 15 November 1998

Frequency UHF kW Service
471.25 MHz 21 500 Channel 4
495.25 MHz 24 500 BBC Two
519.25 MHz 27 500 Meridian (TVS until 1993)
551.25 MHz 31 500 BBC One

Analogue and digital television

15 November 1998 – 31 October 2002

Frequency UHF kW Service System
471.25 MHz 21 500 Channel 4 PAL System I
489.833 MHz 23- 20 BBC (Mux 1) DVB-T
495.25 MHz 24 500 BBC Two PAL System I
513.833 MHz 26- 20 Arqiva (Mux C) DVB-T
519.25 MHz 27 500 ITV1 (Meridian until 2002) PAL System I
530.000 MHz 28 20 Digital 3&4 (Mux 2) DVB-T
546.000 MHz 30 20 SDN (Mux A) DVB-T
551.25 MHz 31 500 BBC One PAL System I
562.166 MHz 32+ 20 BBC (Mux B) DVB-T
570.166 MHz 33+ 20 Arqiva (Mux D) DVB-T

31 October 2002 – 24 May 2007

Frequency UHF kW Service System
471.25 MHz 21 500 Channel 4 PAL System I
489.833 MHz 23- 20 BBC (Mux 1) DVB-T
495.25 MHz 24 500 BBC Two PAL System I
513.833 MHz 26- 20 Arqiva (Mux C) DVB-T
519.25 MHz 27 500 ITV1 PAL System I
530.000 MHz 28 20 Digital 3&4 (Mux 2) DVB-T
546.000 MHz 30 20 SDN (Mux A) DVB-T
551.25 MHz 31 500 BBC One PAL System I
562.166 MHz 32+ 20 BBC (Mux B) DVB-T
570.166 MHz 33+ 20 Arqiva (Mux D) DVB-T
735.25 MHz 54 2 Solent TV PAL System I

24 May 2007 – 25 March 2009

Frequency UHF kW Service System
471.25 MHz 21 500 Channel 4 PAL System I
489.833 MHz 23- 20 BBC (Mux 1) DVB-T
495.25 MHz 24 500 BBC Two PAL System I
513.833 MHz 26- 20 Arqiva (Mux C) DVB-T
519.25 MHz 27 500 ITV1 PAL System I
530.000 MHz 28 20 Digital 3&4 (Mux 2) DVB-T
546.000 MHz 30 20 SDN (Mux A) DVB-T
551.25 MHz 31 500 BBC One PAL System I
562.166 MHz 32+ 20 BBC (Mux B) DVB-T
570.166 MHz 33+ 20 Arqiva (Mux D) DVB-T

25 March 2009 – 7 March 2012

Frequency UHF kW Service System
471.25 MHz 21 500 Channel 4 PAL System I
495.25 MHz 24 500 BBC Two PAL System I
519.25 MHz 27 500 ITV1 PAL System I
530.166 MHz 28+ 20 BBC (Mux B) DVB-T
545.833 MHz 30- 20 SDN (Mux A) DVB-T
551.25 MHz 31 500 BBC One PAL System I
562.166 MHz 32+ 20 Digital 3&4 (Mux 2) DVB-T
570.166 MHz 33+ 20 Arqiva (Mux D) DVB-T
578.000 MHz 34 20 BBC (Mux 1) DVB-T
602.166 MHz 37+ 20 Arqiva (Mux C) DVB-T

7 March 2012 – 21 March 2012

Frequency UHF kW Service System
H V
471.25 MHz 21 500 Channel 4 PAL System I
498.000 MHz 24 200 200 BBC A DVB-T
519.25 MHz 27 500 ITV1 PAL System I
530.166 MHz 28+ 20 BBC (Mux B) DVB-T
545.833 MHz 30- 20 SDN (Mux A) DVB-T
551.25 MHz 31 500 BBC One PAL System I
562.166 MHz 32+ 20 Digital 3&4 (Mux 2) DVB-T
570.166 MHz 33+ 20 Arqiva (Mux D) DVB-T
602.166 MHz 37+ 20 Arqiva (Mux C) DVB-T

Digital television

21 March 2012 – 18 April 2012

Frequency UHF kW Operator System
H V
474.166 MHz 21+ 200 200 BBC B DVB-T2
498.000 MHz 24 200 200 BBC A DVB-T
522.000 MHz 27 200 200 Digital 3&4 DVB-T
545.833 MHz 30- 50 SDN DVB-T
570.166 MHz 33+ 50 Arqiva B DVB-T
602.166 MHz 37+ 50 Arqiva A DVB-T

18 April 2012 – present

The commercial multiplexes were situated on their pre-DSO frequencies until 18 April 2012, when they started transmitting at vertical polarisation.[6]

Frequency UHF kW Operator System
H V
474.166 MHz 21+ 200 200 BBC B DVB-T2
482.166 MHz 22+ 50 200 Arqiva A DVB-T
498.000 MHz 24 200 200 BBC A DVB-T
506.000 MHz 25 50 200 SDN DVB-T
522.000 MHz 27 200 200 Digital 3&4 DVB-T
530.000 MHz 28 50 200 Arqiva B DVB-T
602.000 MHz 37 10 - Local Multiplex DVB-T

See also

  • Chillerton Down – a transmission site approximately 2.5 miles (4.0 km) from Rowridge, broadcasting a mix of analogue and digital radio stations not available from Rowridge
  • List of masts

References

  1. ^ Pawley, Edward. 1972. BBC Engineering 1922 – 1972, p. 377. BBC, London. ISBN 0-563-12127-0.
  2. ^ Kilvington, T. The London—Isle-of-Wight Television Link, Stage One. POEEJ 48 (1):36–38
  3. ^ "Isle of Wight County Press - "Stand by for the digital switch"". www.iwcp.co.uk. Retrieved 11 January 2014.
  4. ^ Isle of Wight Planning Application – TCP/23520/R, P/00748/09
  5. ^ Radio Listeners Guide 2010
  6. ^ "Digital Switchover Transmitter Details – Meridian Region" (PDF). 5 January 2011. Retrieved 26 May 2011.

External links

Horndean

Horndean is a village and civil parish in the East Hampshire district of Hampshire, England. It is 8 miles (13 km) north of Portsmouth.

The nearest railway station is 2.2 miles (3.5 km) southeast of the village at Rowlands Castle.

The village has a population of c.12,600, increasing to 12,942 at the 2011 Census. It shares the semi-rural character of other settlements in the district.

The village was probably best known as the home of Gales Brewery, which existed in the village from 1850. Privately owned until November 2005, when it was bought by Fuller, Smith and Turner, it was closed in April 2006 when it was converted to shops and flats. It was the largest local employer until the opening of the Safeway, now Morrisons, supermarket in 1994. Premier Inn have a hotel in the village, recently expanded in 2017/18.

A number of improvements and developments to the shops, restaurants and pubs in the village from 2016 onwards have been made.

Isle of Wight

The Isle of Wight (; also referred to informally as The Island or abbreviated to IoW) is a county and the largest and second-most populous island in England. It is in the English Channel, between 2 and 5 miles off the coast of Hampshire, separated by the Solent. The island has resorts that have been holiday destinations since Victorian times, and is known for its mild climate, coastal scenery, and verdant landscape of fields, downland and chines. The island is designated a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve.

The island has been home to the poets Swinburne and Tennyson and to Queen Victoria, who built her much-loved summer residence and final home Osborne House at East Cowes. It has a maritime and industrial tradition including boat-building, sail-making, the manufacture of flying boats, the hovercraft, and Britain's space rockets. The island hosts annual music festivals including the Isle of Wight Festival, which in 1970 was the largest rock music event ever held. It has well-conserved wildlife and some of the richest cliffs and quarries for dinosaur fossils in Europe.

The isle was owned by a Norman family until 1293 and was earlier a kingdom in its own right. In common with the Crown dependencies, the British Crown was then represented on the island by the Governor of the Isle of Wight until 1995. The island has played an important part in the defence of the ports of Southampton and Portsmouth, and been near the front-line of conflicts through the ages, including the Spanish Armada and the Battle of Britain. Rural for most of its history, its Victorian fashionability and the growing affordability of holidays led to significant urban development during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Historically part of Hampshire, the island became a separate administrative county in 1890. It continued to share the Lord Lieutenant of Hampshire until 1974, when it was made its own ceremonial county. Apart from a shared police force, there is now no administrative link with Hampshire, although a combined local authority with Portsmouth and Southampton was considered, this is now unlikely to proceed.The quickest public transport link to the mainland is the hovercraft from Ryde to Southsea; three vehicle ferry and two catamaran services cross the Solent to Southampton, Lymington and Portsmouth.

List of tallest structures in the United Kingdom

This list contains all types of structures, 150 metres (490 ft) in height or more, which is the accepted criterion for a building to qualify as a skyscraper in the United Kingdom.

Entries in italics denote approximate figures.

Rowridge

Rowridge is a hamlet on the Isle of Wight towards the west in an area known as West Wight. It is the location of the Rowridge transmitting station, a 149.6 metres (491 ft) tall guyed transmitting mast. According to the Post Office the 2011 census population was included in the civil parish of Newport.

That's Solent

That's Solent is a local television station on the south coast of England, owned and operated by That's TV.

Whitehawk Hill transmitting station

The Whitehawk Hill transmitting station (also known as the Whitehawk transmitting station) is a broadcasting and telecommunications facility located at Whitehawk, an eastern suburb of Brighton in the English city of Brighton and Hove. It is the city's main transmission facility for television and radio signals. It broadcasts digital television, FM and DAB radio to the coastal city of Brighton and Hove and to surrounding areas along the Sussex coast. It stopped broadcasting analogue television when the digital switchover occurred locally in March 2012.

Services broadcast include BBC One (South East), BBC Two, ITV (Meridian), Channel 4, BBC national radio stations, BBC Sussex and Heart Sussex.

United Kingdom Television transmitter and major relay sites in the United Kingdom
England
Scotland
Wales
Northern Ireland
Rowridge VHF 405-line Transmitter Group
Transmitter stations

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