Round barrow

A round barrow is a type of tumulus and is one of the most common types of archaeological monuments. Although concentrated in Europe, they are found in many parts of the world, probably because of their simple construction and universal purpose.

In Britain, most of them were built between 2200BC and 1100BC. [1]. This was the Late Neolithic period to the Late Bronze Age. Later Iron Age barrows were mostly different, and sometimes square.[2]

Heywood sumner barrows plans and sections
Schematic plans and sections of various types of round barrow

Description

At its simplest, a round barrow is a hemispherical mound of earth and/or stone raised over a burial placed in the middle. Beyond this there are numerous variations which may employ surrounding ditches, stone kerbs or flat berms between ditch and mound. Construction methods range from a single creation process of heaped material to a complex depositional sequence involving alternating layers of stone, soil and turf with timbers or wattle used to help hold the structure together.

The center may be placed a stone chamber or cist or in a cut grave. Both intact inhumations and cremations placed in vessels can be found.

Many round barrows attract surrounding satellite burials or later ones inserted into the mound itself. In some cases these occur hundreds or even thousands of years after the original barrow was built and were placed by entirely different cultures.

Numerous subtypes include the bell barrow, bowl barrow, saucer barrow and disc barrow.

Examples

Scandinavia

Denmark

Denmark has many tumuli, including round barrows. The round barrows here, were built over a very broad span of time and culture, from the Neolithic Stone Age to the Viking Age and show a large variation of construction design, while sharing a common exterior look.[3] Tumulis were protected by law in 1937.

Loddenhøj

Loddenhøj near Aarhus. Many smaller round barrows in Denmark are encircled by agricultural fields.

Tinghøj Hammershøj Kvorning 2010-01-08 2

Tinghøjen near Randers. Many barrows are overgrown by shrubs or trees.

Jelling church and burrows

The two round barrows at Jelling from the Viking Age, are the youngest in Denmark.

Britain

In Britain round barrows generally date to the Early Bronze Age although Neolithic examples are also known. Later round barrows were also sometimes used by Roman, Viking and Saxon societies. Examples include Rillaton barrow and Round Loaf. Where several contemporary round barrows are grouped together, the area is referred to as a barrow cemetery.

England

Bronkham Hill barrow cemetery, Dorset
Round barrows on the chalk ridge of Bronkam Hill in Dorset, England. There are numerous round barrows along the south Dorset Ridgeway, including some well-preserved examples of the different sub-types.
  • Beacon Hill, near Cleethorpes
  • Bully Hill, near Tealby
  • Bully Hills, Gräberfeld near Tathwell
  • Burgh on Bain, Barrows near Burgh on Bain
  • Burwell Wood, Barrows near Muckton
  • Buslingthorpe, near Buslingthorpe
  • Butterbumps, Gräberfeld near Willoughby
  • Cleatham Barrow, near Manton
  • Donnington-on-Bain, near Donington on Bain
  • Folk Moot & Butt Mound, near Silk Willoughby
  • Fordington Barrows, near Ulceby
  • Grim's Mound, near Burgh on Bain
  • Hagworthingham, near Hagworthingham
  • Hatcliffe Barrow, near Hatcliffe
  • Howe Hill, near Ulceby
  • King's Hill, Barrow/Mound near Bardney
  • Ludford Barrow, near Ludford
  • Mill Hill, near Claxby
  • Revesby Barrows, near Revesby
  • Ring Holt, near Dalby

See also

References

  1. ^ https://heritagecalling.com/2015/07/10/a-brief-introduction-to-bronze-age-barrows/
  2. ^ Two Iron Age round barrows and a Bronze Age round barrow
  3. ^ Dictionary: Rundhøj Alt om Fortidsminder (Denmarks' Cultural Heritage agency) ‹See Tfd›(in Danish)

External links

A166 road

The A166 road is a trunk road between the outskirts of York and Driffield in the historic county of Yorkshire. The road used to terminate at the seaside town of Bridlington, until the opening of the Driffield by-pass caused the final section to be renumbered as the A614.

Black Down, Somerset

Black Down is the highest hill in the Mendip Hills, Somerset, in south-western England. Black Down lies just a few miles eastward of the Bristol Channel at Weston-super-Mare, and provides a view over the Chew Valley. The summit is marked with an Ordnance Survey trig point, the base of which has been rebuilt by the Mendip Hills AONB authority.

The shortest route of ascent goes from the Burrington Combe car park and is approximately 1 km long.

Black Down is an open-access area mostly consisting of moors, with dense cover of associated vegetation such as heather and bracken. According to a local organization's newsletter, the name "Black Down" comes from the Saxon word 'Blac' or 'Bloec' meaning bleak, 'Dun' meaning down or fort.

Brandsby-cum-Stearsby

Brandsby-cum-Stearsby is a civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England, with a population of 234 (2001 census), increasing to 383 at the 2011 Census and including Dalby-cum-Skewsby and Yearsley. It includes the villages of Brandsby and Stearsby.

There are five scheduled ancient monuments in the parish, all round barrows:

Round barrow 300m south of Barhouse Farm at grid reference SE587719

Round barrow 450m north-east of Hagg Farm grid reference SE62347199

Round barrow 300m east of Warren House grid reference SE60507316

Round barrow 150m south of Warren House grid reference SE60187303

Round barrow 300m west of Quarry House grid reference SE60587285

Coetan Arthur

Coetan Arthur dolmen, also known as Arthur's Quoit (not to be confused with Carreg Coetan Arthur, near Newport) is the remains of a Neolithic burial chamber (also known as a quoit). It dates from around 3000 BCE. The site, situated on the hillside close to St Davids Head in Pembrokeshire, Wales, is the collapsed chamber of what is presumed to be a passage grave which also has a round barrow. The massive capstone measures approximately 6 metres by 2.5 metres and is supported on one side by an orthostat approximately 1.5 metres in height.

The headland is in the care of the National Trust and the site is a scheduled ancient monument.

Hannah cum Hagnaby

Hannah cum Hagnaby is a civil parish in the East Lindsey district of Lincolnshire, England. It is situated approximately 4 miles (6 km) north-east from Alford, and 15 miles (24 km) south-east from Louth The parish contains two small hamlets, Hannah and Hagnaby.

Hannah was used in the Bronze age as there is evidence of a Round Barrow.

In antiquity Hannah was known as Hannay. The church, located in Hannah, is dedicated to Saint Andrew and is a Grade I listed building, built of greenstone about 1758, with early 19th, and some 20th-century, alterations.Hagnaby Priory, later Hagnaby Abbey, was situated in Hagnaby. Pevsner states that a Premonstratensian priory, founded in 1175, stood 0.5 miles (0.8 km) to the north of the village. Fragments of the priory, including octagonal shafts and window tracery, exist at Hagnaby Abbey Farm 1.25 miles (2.0 km) to the west. English Heritage has noted the existence of the suppressed priory through evidence of aerial photographs and building debris, and grassed foundations of a later formal garden and post-medieval house.

List of Scheduled Monuments in Bridgend

Bridgend County Borough stretches from the south coast of Wales up to the southern edge of the Brecon Beacons. The 57 Scheduled monuments cover over 4,000 years of the history of this part of South Wales. There are chambered tombs of the Neolithic, and burial cairns and standing stones of the Bronze Age, Iron Age hillforts, and a Roman villa. Four early medieval sites and 23 from the medieval post-Norman period cover defences, dwellings, stones and churches. Finally the modern period, beginning with an Elizabethan manor house, marks 400 years of industrial history, and ends at defenses from World War II. All of the sites on this list (and the whole of Bridgend County Borough) are within the historic county of Glamorgan.

Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) have statutory protection. The compilation of the list is undertaken by Cadw Welsh Historic Monuments, which is an executive agency of the National Assembly of Wales. The list of scheduled monuments below is supplied by Cadw with additional material from RCAHMW and Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust.

List of Scheduled Monuments in Conwy

The Conwy County Borough is on the north coast of Wales, and has a heavily populated coastal strip. A third of the county is within the Snowdonia National Park. There are a total of 161 Scheduled Monuments in the county. 106 of these are Prehistoric, including at least 6 neolithic sites. Like much of Wales, there are large numbers of Bronze Age sites, particularly burial mounds, and some 40 Iron Age sites including hillforts and hut groups. There are just 3 Roman sites, and 6 Early medieval (Pre-Norman Conquest), all of which are early Christian monuments, including inscribed stones and a holy well. From the post-Norman medieval period, the castle and walls of Conwy itself are part of a World Heritage Site. There are numerous other fortified sites, along with lost villages, ruined chapels and a Bishop's palace amongst the 24 medieval sites. In the post-medieval period, there are 2 sites, including churches, bridges, lead mines and World War II defences. Conwy is made up of parts of the historic counties of Denbighshire and Caernarvonshire, which are covered respectively by the Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust (CPAT) and Gwyneth Archaeological Trust.

Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) have statutory protection. It is illegal to disturb the ground surface or any standing remains. The compilation of the list of sites is undertaken by Cadw Welsh Historic Monuments, which is an executive agency of the National Assembly of Wales. The list of scheduled monuments below is supplied by Cadw with additional material from RCAHMW and Clwyd-Powys and Gwynedd Archaeological Trusts.

List of Scheduled Monuments in Denbighshire

The county of Denbighshire is in north-east Wales, occupying the Vale of Clwyd and the uplands to the west, east and south. There are 168 Scheduled Monuments in the county. The oldest is from 225,000 years ago, the oldest inhabited site in Wales. A further 3 limestone cave systems also have Paleolithic deposits. Three chambered tombs date to the Neolithic. The moorlands in particular are home to many of the 100 Bronze Age and Iron Age, the vast majority of which are burial mounds. There are some 21 hill forts and other enclosure sites, and several stone circles. There are only 3 sites from the Roman period, and none dating to Early Medieval times. From the Medieval period itself on the other hand, there are 40 sites, including castles, town walls, chapels, crosses, domestic buildings, defensive buildings, bridges and monastic sites. There are 18 post-medieval sites, being a very diverse mix of site types and dates. Most notable is the World Heritage Site at Pontcysyllte Aqueduct. The modern county of Denbighshire bears only slight alignment with the historic county of the same name. The modern county includes parts of historic Merionethshire and Flintshire.

Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) have statutory protection. It is illegal to disturb the ground surface or any standing remains. The compilation of the list is undertaken by Cadw Welsh Historic Monuments, which is an executive agency of the National Assembly of Wales. The list of scheduled monuments below is supplied by Cadw with additional material from RCAHMW and Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust.

List of Scheduled Monuments in Flintshire

The county of Flintshire is on the north-east coast of Wales, and two ancient border earthworks run through the length of the county. There are 131 Scheduled Monuments in the post-1996 county of Flintshire. (The historic county of Flintshire, with its unusual separate exclave, is now split between the unitary areas of Flintshire, Wrexham and Denbighshire, so would have had considerably more scheduled sites). There are a great many prehistoric sites for such a small county. With only one confirmed Neolithic site, it is the Bronze Age and Iron Age sites that dominate, 67 of them found mainly on the north-west of the county. In the main these are burial mounds with 8 hillforts and other enclosures. From the Early medieval period, Offa's Dyke has 10 notable sections in the county, whilst the older Wat's Dyke has 19 scheduled sections. From the post-Norman medieval period, Flintshire offers a very diverse range of monument types: 20 sites, with 10 different site types, including castles, castle mounds, moated sites, chapels and a holy well, field systems, a deserted village and an abbey. In the post-medieval period, there is a packhorse bridge and a lockup, but it is the industrial sites that stand out, especially the water-powered industries in the Greenfield Valley and the Pottery sites in Buckley. Flintshire lies wholly within the historic county of Flintshire.

Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) have statutory protection. It is illegal to disturb the ground surface or any standing remains. The compilation of the list of sites is undertaken by Cadw Welsh Historic Monuments, which is an executive agency of the National Assembly of Wales. The list of scheduled monuments below is supplied by Cadw with additional material from RCAHMW and Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust.

List of Scheduled Monuments in Wrexham

The county borough of Wrexham is in north-east Wales, straddling the ancient border earthwork Offa's Dyke. There are 107 Scheduled Monuments in the county borough. The 29 Bronze Age and Iron Age sites are mainly found to the west of Offa's dyke, and are in the main burial mounds and hillforts on the uplands. To the east of the dyke are the majority of the 18 medieval sites, mainly domestic, defensive or ecclesiastical. Running through the centre are the 28 early medieval sites along Offa's Dyke, and 10 scheduled sections of the older Wat's Dyke. Close by, clustered around the coal and mineral deposits in a central belt are also the 19 post-medieval sites. These are extraction and industrial sites, plus the World Heritage Site at Pontcysyllte Aqueduct. The Wrexham administrative area lies within the two historic counties of Denbighshire and Flintshire.

Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) have statutory protection. The compilation of the list is undertaken by Cadw Welsh Historic Monuments, which is an executive agency of the National Assembly of Wales. The list of scheduled monuments below is supplied by Cadw with additional material from RCAHMW and Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust.

List of Scheduled Monuments in the Vale of Glamorgan

The Vale of Glamorgan county borough is a rural and agricultural area of south Wales. With 110 Scheduled Monuments, evenly spread across the borough, it is an area with a high density of such sites. Forty-one sites date to prehistoric times, including three neolithic tombs, eighteen round barrows and sixteen iron age hill forts. The four Roman sites include two Roman Villas, and there are seven pre-Norman medieval sites, mainly chapels and crosses. It is the 52 medieval monuments that provide some of the most visible remains. There are seven castles and a further eighteen defensive locations. There are also eight religious sites, including crosses, a chantry and a priory. Unusually, 4 of the 6 post-medieval sites are 20th-century structures, being World War II defenses. All of the Vale of Glamorgan administrative area lies within the historic county of Glamorgan.

Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) have statutory protection. The compilation of the list is undertaken by Cadw Welsh Historic Monuments, which is an executive agency of the National Assembly of Wales. The list of scheduled monuments below is supplied by Cadw with additional material from RCAHMW and Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust.

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Carmarthenshire

Carmarthenshire is a large rural county in West Wales. It includes mix of upland and mountainous terrain and fertile farmland. The western end of the Brecon Beacons National Park lies within the county. Across Carmarthenshire there are a total of 370 Scheduled monuments, which is too many for a single list page. For convenience the list is divided into the 227 prehistoric sites (shown below) and the 143 Roman to modern sites. Included on this page are small number of stone chambered tombs from the Neolithic. There are a large and diverse variety of burial cairns, mounds and barrows, mainly from the Bronze Age, accounting for 197 sites. A further 49 Iron Age sites are mostly defensive sites such as hillforts and enclosures. Carmarthenshire is both a unitary authority and a historic county. Between 1974 and 1996 it was merged with Cardiganshire (now Ceredigion) and Pembrokeshire to form Dyfed.

All the Roman, early medieval, medieval and modern sites are listed at List of Scheduled Roman to modern Monuments in Carmarthenshire

Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) have statutory protection. It is illegal to disturb the ground surface or any standing remains. The compilation of the list is undertaken by Cadw Welsh Historic Monuments, which is an executive agency of the National Assembly of Wales. The list of scheduled monuments below is supplied by Cadw with additional material from RCAHMW and Dyfed Archaeological Trust.

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Ceredigion

Ceredigion is a large rural county in West Wales. It has a long coastline of Cardigan Bay to the west and the remote moorland of the Cambrian Mountains in the east, with the mountainous terrain of Plynlimon in the northeast. Ceredigion has a total of 264 Scheduled monuments. That is too many to have on a single list page, so for convenience the list is divided into the 163 prehistoric sites (shown below) and the 101 Roman to modern sites. Included on this page are 13 Neolithic and Bronze Age standing stones and 3 stone circles. There are a large and diverse variety of burial cairns, mounds and barrows, mainly from the Bronze Age and mainly on the eastern uplands, accounting for some 79 sites. A further 70 defensive Iron Age sites such as hillforts and enclosures are found across the county. Ceredigion is both a unitary authority and a historic county. Historically the county was called Cardiganshire. Between 1974 and 1996 it was merged with Carmarthenshire and Pembrokeshire to form Dyfed.

All the Roman, early medieval, medieval and modern sites are listed at List of Scheduled Roman to modern Monuments in Ceredigion

Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) have statutory protection. It is illegal to disturb the ground surface or any standing remains. The compilation of the list is undertaken by Cadw Welsh Historic Monuments, which is an executive agency of the National Assembly of Wales. The list of scheduled monuments below is supplied by Cadw with additional material from RCAHMW and Dyfed Archaeological Trust.

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Powys (Montgomeryshire)

Powys is the largest administrative county in Wales. With over a quarter of Wales's land area, and covering much of the eastern half of the country, it is a county of remote uplands, low population and no coastline. It was created in more or less its current form in 1974, and is the only one of the large county units created at that time to have been carried forward intact at the 1996 local government re-organisation. It comprises three historic counties, namely Montgomeryshire, Radnorshire, and most of Brecknockshire. There are 950 Scheduled monuments within the county, which is far more than can be sensibly covered in one list. Each of the 3 historic counties is therefore listed separately, and each of these has two lists - one for the prehistoric sites and one for the Roman, medieval and post-medieval sites.

This list shows the many prehistoric sites in Montgomeryshire, the northern third of Powys. Of the 303 Scheduled Monuments in the Montgomeryshire area 190 date to prehistoric periods. Of these, only two are known to be Neolithic. A remarkable 117 are likely to date from the Bronze age, mainly burial sites of various sorts but also including 23 standing stones, stones circles and stone alignments. There are 70 Iron Age hillforts, defensive enclosures and hut sites.

The lists of Scheduled Monuments in Powys are as follows:-

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Powys (Brecknockshire) (254 sites)

List of Scheduled Roman to modern Monuments in Powys (Brecknockshire) (135 sites)

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Powys (Radnorshire) (139 sites)

List of Scheduled Roman to modern Monuments in Powys (Radnorshire) (119 sites)

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Powys (Montgomeryshire) (190 sites - shown below)

List of Scheduled Roman to modern Monuments in Powys (Montgomeryshire) (113 sites)Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) have statutory protection. It is illegal to disturb the ground surface or any standing remains. The compilation of the list is undertaken by Cadw Welsh Historic Monuments, which is an executive agency of the National Assembly of Wales. The list of scheduled monuments below is supplied by Cadw with additional material from RCAHMW and Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust.

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Powys (Radnorshire)

Powys is the largest administrative county in Wales. With an over a quarter of Wales's land area, covering much of the eastern half of the country, it is a county of remote uplands, low population and no coastline. It was created in more or less its current form in 1974, and is the only one of the large county units created at that time to have been carried forward intact at the 1996 local government re-organisation. It comprises three historic counties, namely Montgomeryshire, Radnorshire, and most of Brecknockshire. There are 950 Scheduled monuments within the county, which is far more than can be sensibly covered in one list. Each of the 3 historic counties is therefore listed separately, and each of these has two lists - one for the prehistoric sites and one for the Roman, medieval and post-medieval sites.

This list shows the prehistoric sites in Radnorshire, which occupies the central third of Powys. The River Wye separates it from Brecknockorshire to the south, and Montgomeryshire forms the northern third of Powys. There are 139 prehistoric scheduled monuments in the Radnorshire area. Of these, only two are neolithic burial sites. An extraordinary 117 are likely to date from the Bronze age, mainly burial sites of various sorts but also including a cup-marked stone, 11 stone circles and stone alignments, and 17 standing stones. There are 20 Iron Age hillforts, defensive and other enclosures.

The lists of Scheduled Monuments in Powys are as follows:-

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Powys (Brecknockshire) (254 sites)

List of Scheduled Roman to modern Monuments in Powys (Brecknockshire) (135 sites)

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Powys (Radnorshire) (139 sites - shown below)

List of Scheduled Roman to modern Monuments in Powys (Radnorshire) (119 sites)

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Powys (Montgomeryshire) (190 sites)

List of Scheduled Roman to modern Monuments in Powys (Montgomeryshire) (113 sites)Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) have statutory protection. It is illegal to disturb the ground surface or any standing remains. The compilation of the list is undertaken by Cadw Welsh Historic Monuments, which is an executive agency of the National Assembly of Wales. The list of scheduled monuments below is supplied by Cadw with additional material from RCAHMW and Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust.

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in north Pembrokeshire

Pembrokeshire is the fifth-largest county in Wales, but has more Ancient Monuments (526) than any except Powys. This gives it an extremely high density of monuments, with 33.4 per 100km2. (Only the tiny County Boroughs of Newport and Merthyr Tydfil have a higher density). With three-quarters of its boundary being coastline, Pembrokeshire occupies the western end of the West Wales peninsular, terminating with the tiny cathedral city of St David's. It was a historic county in its own right but between 1975 and 1996 it joined Carmarthen and Ceredigion in the much larger county of Dyfed.

Over two thirds of Pembrokeshire's Ancient Monuments (346) date to pre-historic times. Even this is too many entries to conveniently show in one list, so the list is subdivided into three, separating the Roman to modern on one list, and subdividing the prehistoric sites along the lines of the former local districts of Preseli Pembrokeshire, (the northern half) and South Pembrokeshire. The list below shows the 233 sites in the north. This includes hill forts, promontory forts on both coastal headlands and inland locations. It also includes a variety of enclosures, hut sites and Raths, a wide range of burial sites and other ritual and religious sites listed as barrows and chambered tombs, stone circles and standing stones. There is a matching list of 113 prehistoric sites in south Pembrokeshire.

The county's 182 Roman, medieval and post-medieval sites are all included in the third Pembrokeshire list, which covers inscribed stones, stone crosses, holy wells, castles, mottes and baileys, priories, chapels and churches, houses, town walls and a Bishop's palace, along with a wide variety of post-medieval sites from coalmines, kilns and dovecotes through to World War II defensive structures.

Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) have statutory protection. The compilation of the list is undertaken by Cadw Welsh Historic Monuments, which is an executive agency of the National Assembly of Wales. The list of scheduled monuments below is supplied by Cadw with additional material from RCAHMW and Dyfed Archaeological Trust.

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in south Pembrokeshire

Pembrokeshire is only the fifth-largest county in Wales, but contains the second largest number of Ancient Monuments (526) after Powys. This gives it an extremely high density of monuments, with 33.4 per 100km2. (Only the tiny County Boroughs of Newport and Merthyr Tydfil have a higher density). With three-quarters of its boundary being coastline, Pembrokeshire occupies the western end of the West Wales peninsular, terminating with the tiny cathedral city of St David's. It was a historic county in its own right but between 1975 and 1996 it joined Carmarthen and Ceredigion in the much larger county of Dyfed.

Over two thirds of Pembrokeshire's Ancient Monuments (346) date to pre-historic times. Even this is too many entries to conveniently show in one list, so the list is subdivided into three, separating the Roman to modern on one list, and subdividing the prehistoric sites along the lines of the former local districts of Preseli Pembrokeshire, (the northern half) and South Pembrokeshire. The list below shows the 112 sites in the south. This includes hill forts, promontory forts on both coastal headlands and inland locations. It also includes a variety of enclosures, hut sites and Raths, a wide range of burial sites and other ritual and religious sites listed as barrows and chambered tombs, stone circles and standing stones. There is a matching list of 233 prehistoric sites in north Pembrokeshire

The county's 182 Roman, medieval and post-medieval sites are all included in the third Pembrokeshire list, which covers inscribed stones, stone crosses, holy wells, castles, mottes and baileys, priories, chapels and churches, houses, town walls and a Bishop's palace, along with a wide variety of post-medieval sites from coalmines, kilns and dovecotes through to World War II defensive structures.

Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) have statutory protection. The compilation of the list is undertaken by Cadw Welsh Historic Monuments, which is an executive agency of the National Assembly of Wales. The list of scheduled monuments below is supplied by Cadw with additional material from RCAHMW and Dyfed Archaeological Trust.

Llanbadarn Fynydd

Llanbadarn Fynydd (meaning Church of Padarn in the mountain) is a village and community in Radnorshire, Powys, Wales, and is 63 miles (101 km) from Cardiff and 149 miles (240 km) from London.The community includes the villages of Llanbadarn Fynydd, Llananno and Llaithddu. In 2011 the population of Llanbadarn Fynydd was 306 with 8.8% of them able to speak Welsh.Castell y Blaidd Medieval Settlement lies nearby as well as Coventry Round Barrow and Moel Dod Round Barrow.

The New Inn is a former 17th-century coaching inn, now a family-run pub and restaurant.It lies on the A483 road which runs from Swansea to Chester.

Scleddau

Scleddau is a village and a community in the county of Pembrokeshire, Wales, and is 2 miles (3.2 km) south of Fishguard on the A40. In 2011 the population of Scleddau was 1,013 with 34.2 per cent able to speak Welsh.The River Cleddau which lends its name to the village flows under the main road. Castell Hendre-Wen and the Round Barrow on Jordanson Hill are both Scheduled prehistoric Monuments dating back to the early Iron Age. 1 mile (1.6 km) south-east of Scleddau, and within the community, is the Grade II Listed Church of St Justinian, in the village of Trecwn.

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