Ross Browner

Ross Dean Browner (born March 22, 1954) is a former American football defensive end who played 10 seasons in the NFL, mainly for the Cincinnati Bengals. Browner was named to the Bengals' 40th Anniversary Team in 2007.

Ross Browner
No. 79
Position:Defensive end
Personal information
Born:March 22, 1954 (age 65)
Warren, Ohio
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:262 lb (119 kg)
Career information
High school:Warren (OH) Western Reserve
College:Notre Dame
NFL Draft:1978 / Round: 1 / Pick: 8
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com

Early life

Growing up in Warren, Ohio, Browner was primarily interested in swimming and diving before concentrating on football. He attended Warren Western Reserve High School and during his senior year he was named first-team AAA (big school) all-state defensive end.[1]

College years

Ross Browner was one of the most decorated defensive players in the history of college football. At the University of Notre Dame he was a four-year starter at defensive end in 1973 and 1975-77.[2] He was a unanimous All-America his junior and senior seasons of 1976 and 1977. In 1976, he won the Outland trophy as the nation's best interior or defensive lineman also in 1976 United Press International named him Lineman of the Year. He won the Lombardi Trophy as the nation's best lineman and the Maxwell Award as the nation's best player and again won the UPI Lineman of the Year Award, the only player ever to win it twice. In the decade of the 1970s, Browner was the only lineman who won the Maxwell. In 1977, he also placed fifth in voting for the Heisman Trophy. During his senior year in college, he was featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated with the subheading of "Notre Dame's Peerless Ross Browner."

Notre Dame had a 39-7 record in his time that covered 11-0 in 1973, 8-3 in 1975, 9-3 in 1976, and 11-1 in 1977. Notre Dame won National Championships in 1973 and 1977. His career statistics record 340 tackles, a school record; ten deflected passes, two blocked kicks. He also scored a touchdown and two safeties. Browner was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1999.[3]

Professional years

He was the first-round draft pick in the 1978 NFL Draft for the Cincinnati Bengals. Voted the team's Most Valuable Player in 1978, he played nine seasons for the Bengals. He set the Super Bowl record for tackles by a defensive lineman in Super Bowl XVI. In 1985, he jumped to the Houston Gamblers of the USFL, but returned the same season to the Bengals. Browner played one season (1987) with the Green Bay Packers before retiring.

Personal life

After retiring, Browner lived for several years in Mason, Ohio and has worked in real estate, sports entertainment, the cleaning industry, insurance, mortgages and business development. He currently is working in real estate and lives in Nashville, Tennessee.

Browner is the father of former Pittsburgh Steelers offensive tackle Max Starks and former University of Arizona player Rylan Browner. Ross' brothers are former NFL players Keith Browner and Joey Browner.[4] His nephew Keith Browner, Jr. currently plays for the Houston Texans.

References

  1. ^ http://www.ohsaa.org/sports/history/FT/72AllOhioTeams.pdf
  2. ^ "Ross Browner Bio :: Notre Dame Football :: UND.COM :: The Official Site of ND Athletics". und.com.
  3. ^ http://www.rossbrowner.com/#/principal/4520051771
  4. ^ "Waking the Echoes: Ross Browner // The Observer". ndsmcobserver.com. 30 October 2014.
1976 College Football All-America Team

The 1976 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1976. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes four selectors as "official" for the 1976 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) selected by the nation's football writers; and (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers. Other selectors included Football News (FN), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), The Sporting News (TSN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC).

Three players were unanimously selected by all four official selectors and all five unofficial selectors. They were running backs Tony Dorsett of Pittsburgh and Ricky Bell of USC and defensive end Ross Browner of Notre Dame.

The 1976 USC Trojans football team led all others with five players who received first-team All-American honors in 1976. In addition to Ricky Bell, the USC honorees were offensive tackle Marvin Powell, defensive end Dennis Thurman, defensive tackle Gary Jeter, and punter Glen Walker. The consensus national champion Pittsburgh Panthers team had two first-team honorees: Tony Dorsett and middle guard Al Romano.

1977 College Football All-America Team

The 1977 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1977. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes four selectors as "official" for the 1977 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) selected by the nation's football writers; and (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers. Other selectors included Football News (FN), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), The Sporting News (TSN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC).

Eight players were unanimously selected by all four official selectors and all four unofficial selectors. They were Ken MacAfee of Notre Dame, offensive tackle Chris Ward of Ohio State, offensive guard Mark Donahue of Michigan, running backs Earl Campbell of Texas and Terry Miller of Oklahoma State, defensive ends Art Still of Kentucky and Ross Browner of Notre Dame, defensive tackle Brad Shearer of Texas.

1977 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team

The 1977 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team represented the University of Notre Dame during the 1977 NCAA Division I football season. The Irish, coached by Dan Devine, ended the season with 11 wins and one loss, winning the national championship. The Fighting Irish won the title by defeating the previously unbeaten and No. 1 ranked Texas Longhorns in the Cotton Bowl Classic by a score of a 38–10. The 1977 squad became the tenth Irish team to win the national title and were led by All-Americans Ken MacAfee, Ross Browner, Luther Bradley, and Bob Golic. Junior Joe Montana, a future Pro Football Hall of Famer, was the team's starting quarterback.

1978 Cincinnati Bengals season

The 1978 Cincinnati Bengals season was the team's 11th year in professional football.

Ken Anderson missed the first four games with a broken bone in his right hand, and Homer Rice replaced Bill Johnson as head coach after the Bengals started 0–5. The team dipped to marks of 0–8 and 1–12 before rebounding under Rice to win the last three games. In the season finale, the Bengals blasted Cleveland, 48–16, setting series records for points and victory margin.

1978 Cotton Bowl Classic

The 1978 Mobil Cotton Bowl Classic was the 42nd edition of the college football bowl game, played on Monday, January 2 at the Cotton Bowl in Dallas, Texas. The bowl game featured the independent Notre Dame Fighting Irish versus the Southwest Conference champion Texas Longhorns. A record crowd of 76,701 turned up to see the coronation of the Longhorns championship season, but fifth-ranked Notre Dame spoiled everything as they dominated the Longhorns 38–10.Heisman Trophy winner Earl Campbell gained 116 yards on 29 carries, but was kept out of the end zone. Tied at three after the first quarter, the Irish scored three touchdowns in eight minutes and led 24–10 at halftime, then shut out the Longhorns in the second half. The loss by the Longhorns resulted in complete chaos in the final polls, with Notre Dame vaulting past Alabama to win the national championship.

1979 Cincinnati Bengals season

The 1979 Cincinnati Bengals season was the team's 12th year in professional football and its tenth with the National Football League (NFL). Fullback Pete Johnson powered his way to 15 touchdowns, but the Bengals struggled to their second straight 4-12 record. After the season, former Cleveland coach Forrest Gregg was named to replace Homer Rice as Bengals head coach.

1980 Cincinnati Bengals season

The 1980 Cincinnati Bengals season was the team's 13th year in professional football and its 11th with the National Football League (NFL). The Bengals went 6-10 and managed only 244 points, lowest in the AFC. They did upset defending Super Bowl champion Pittsburgh twice. First-round draft choice Anthony Muñoz began his Hall of Fame career.

1982 World's Strongest Man

The 1982 World's Strongest Man was the sixth edition of World's Strongest Man and was won by Bill Kazmaier from the United States. It was his third title in a row. Tom Magee from Canada finished second and John Gamble from the United States finished third. The contest was held at the Magic Mountain in California.

The World's Strongest Man was held in the United States for the sixth consecutive year; the competition did not return there until 1997.

1983 Cincinnati Bengals season

The 1983 Cincinnati Bengals season was the team's 16th year in professional football and its 14th with the National Football League (NFL).

The Bengals started the season by losing six of their first seven games and finished 7-9. Despite the record, the Bengals claimed the top overall defense in the NFL. In the offseason, Forrest Gregg resigned as head coach and Sam Wyche was named as his replacement.

Browner

Browner is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Brandon Browner (born 1984), American football cornerback

Carol Browner (born 1955), American environmentalist

Joey Browner (born 1960), American football safety

Keith Browner (born 1962), American football defensive end

Ross Browner (born 1954), American football defensive end

Joe Yonto

Joe Yonto (August 2, 1925 – August 4, 2008) was an American football player and coach, serving most of his career at the University of Notre Dame. He served under three national championship coaches (Ara Parseghian, Dan Devine and Lou Holtz) during his career.

A native of Orrville, Ohio, Yonto played fullback as sophomore (1945) and guard as junior (1946) under coach Frank Leahy at Notre Dame. As a senior prior to his 1948 graduation, he served as an assistant freshman team coach after a leg injury ended his playing career. He went on to coach high school football for 16 years at numerous schools, including seven years at Notre Dame High School for Boys in Niles, Illinois.

In 1964 he returned to the University of Notre Dame as defensive line coach under incoming head coach Parseghian, and held that role throughout Parseghian's 11 seasons, as well as six more (1975–80) under Devine, the last four as defensive coordinator. During that period, he was a part of three Notre Dame national championship staffs (1966, 1973 and 1977) and he coached a dozen All-America defensive linemen. That list included Alan Page, Kevin Hardy, Mike McCoy, Walt Patulski, Mike Kadish, Mike Fanning, Steve Niehaus and Ross Browner—all of whom went on to be selected in the first round of the NFL Draft. Browner won the Lombardi, Outland and Maxwell Awards, and Patulski also won the Lombardi.

On 12 occasions, Yonto′s defensive line ranked among the top 10 teams in the country in terms of rushing defense. Eight of those Irish teams gave up less than 100 rushing yards per game, and the 1974 Notre Dame Fighting Irish ranked first nationally in both rushing defense and total defense (195.2 yards per game). During the Gerry Faust years (1981–85), Yonto served as a special assistant to athletic director Gene Corrigan while handling administrative duties in a wide variety of football areas. Then, he returned to serve as defensive line coach in 1986 and 1987 under Lou Holtz.

Yonto spent three more years as a special assistant to athletic director Dick Rosenthal from 1988 to 1991. After his retirement, Yonto represented the University and athletics department at a variety of events.

Keith Browner

Keith Browner Sr. (born January 24, 1962) is a former American football defensive end and outside linebacker. He is the father of Keith Browner, Jr. who was a linebacker for the Cal Golden Bears and plays defensive end for the Houston Texans.

Lombardi Award

The Lombardi Award is awarded by the Lombardi Foundation annually to the best college football player, regardless of position, based on performance, as well as leadership, character, and resiliency. From 1970 until 2016 the award was presented by Rotary International specifically to a lineman or linebacker. The Lombardi Award program was approved by the Rotary International club in Houston in 1970 shortly after the death of famed National Football League coach Vince Lombardi. The committee outlined the criteria for eligibility for the award, which remained in place until 2016: A player should be a down lineman on either offense or defense or a linebacker who lines up no further than five yards deep from the ball.The voting electorate is made up of the head coaches from all NCAA Division I schools, sports media personnel from across the country, and former winners and finalists of the Lombardi Award. The total number of voters is approximately 500. Ohio State University holds the record for most Lombardi awards with six. Orlando Pace, the only two-time winner (1995 and 1996), is the most recent offensive lineman to be honored.

The main part of the trophy used to be a block of granite, paying homage to Lombardi's college days at Fordham University as an offensive lineman when his offensive line was referred to as the "Seven Blocks of Granite". A new trophy designed by Texas sculptor Edd Hayes replaced the original block of granite.

Max Starks

Maximillian Weisner Starks IV (born January 10, 1982) is an American former college and professional football player who was an offensive tackle in the National Football League (NFL) for ten seasons. He played college football for the University of Florida. He was drafted by the Pittsburgh Steelers in the third round of the 2004 NFL Draft, and also played for the NFL's St. Louis Rams.

Maxwell Award

The Maxwell Award is presented annually to the college football player judged by a panel of sportscasters, sportswriters, and National Collegiate Athletic Association head coaches and the membership of the Maxwell Football Club to be the best all-around in the United States. The award is named after Robert "Tiny" Maxwell, a Swarthmore College football player, coach and sportswriter. Johnny Lattner (1952, 1953) and Tim Tebow (2007, 2008) are the only players to have won the award twice. It is the college equivalent of the Bert Bell Award of the National Football League, also given out by the Maxwell Club.

Outland Trophy

The Outland Trophy is awarded to the best college football interior lineman in the United States as adjudged by the Football Writers Association of America. It is named after John H. Outland. One of only a few players ever to be named an All-American at two positions, Outland garnered consensus All-America honors in 1898 as a tackle and consensus honors as a halfback in 1899. Outland had always contended that football tackles and guards deserved greater recognition and conceived the Outland Trophy as a means of providing this recognition. In 1988, Jim Ridlon was commissioned to design and sculpt the Outland Trophy. A member of the National College Football Awards Association, the award has become one of college football's most prestigious.

UPI Lineman of the Year

The United Press International Lineman of the Year award was given annually by United Press International (UPI) to the lineman of the year in college football. With the demise of UPI in 1997, the award was discontinued. Offensive and defensive linemen were eligible, including offensive ends, with one, Howard Twilley, winning in 1965. Like all UPI college awards at the time, it was based on the votes of NCAA coaches. Ross Browner of Notre Dame was the only two-time winner.

Warren G. Harding High School

Warren G. Harding High School is a public high school in Warren, Ohio, United States. It is the only high school in the Warren City School District. Sports teams are called the Raiders, and they compete in the Ohio High School Athletic Association as a member of the All-American Conference.

Wilson Whitley

Wilson Whitley (May 28, 1955 – October 27, 1992) was a consensus All-American defensive tackle at the University of Houston from 1972-1976 under defensive coordinator Don Todd. He led the Cougars to the Southwest Conference championship in football during Houston's first season as a conference member and won the 1976 Lombardi Award as the nation's top lineman. Former President Gerald Ford presented him the award at a ceremony in Houston, Texas.

Whitley was drafted in the first round by the Cincinnati Bengals and started alongside another Lombardi Award winner, Ross Browner, for 6 seasons. He was later named to the Southwest Conference "All Decade Team" for the 1970s.

Whitley died at the age of 37, due to a heart condition. He is a 1998 inductee into University of Houston's Hall of Honor and was a perennial candidate for the National College Football Hall of Fame until his selection in 2007.

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