Rose Center for Earth and Space

The Rose Center for Earth and Space is a part of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. The Center's complete name is The Frederick Phineas and Sandra Priest Rose Center for Earth and Space. The main entrance is located on the northern side of the museum on 81st Street near Central Park West in Manhattan's Upper West Side. Completed in 2000, it includes the new Hayden Planetarium, the original of which was opened in 1935 and closed in 1997. Neil deGrasse Tyson is its first and, to date, only director.

Rose Center for Earth and Space
Rose Center for Earth and Space
Rose Center for Earth and Space is located in New York City
Rose Center for Earth and Space
Location within New York City
Rose Center for Earth and Space is located in New York
Rose Center for Earth and Space
Rose Center for Earth and Space (New York)
Rose Center for Earth and Space is located in the United States
Rose Center for Earth and Space
Rose Center for Earth and Space (the United States)
Established1935
Location75-208 79th Street Central Park West
Coordinates40°46′53.53″N 73°58′23.69″W / 40.7815361°N 73.9732472°WCoordinates: 40°46′53.53″N 73°58′23.69″W / 40.7815361°N 73.9732472°W
TypeNatural history
DirectorNeil deGrasse Tyson

History

Hayden Planetarium
Hayden Planetarium, circa 1935–45

The center is an extensive reworking of the former Hayden Planetarium, whose first projector, dedicated in 1935, had 2 successors previous to the current one.

The original Hayden Planetarium was founded in 1933 with a donation by philanthropist Charles Hayden. In 1935, the Hayden Planetarium, designed by architects Trowbridge & Livingston, opened, after its construction was funded by a $650,000 loan from the Reconstruction Finance Corporation and a $150,000 donation from banker Charles Hayden of Hayden, Stone & Co. Its mission was to give the public "a more lively and sincere appreciation of the magnitude of the universe... and for the wonderful things which are daily occurring in the universe."[1] Joseph M. Chamberlain, hired as an assistant curator in 1952, became Chairman of the Planetarium in 1956.[2] In 1960, a Zeiss Mark IV projector was installed, followed by a Zeiss Mark VI projector and new seats in 1993.

In January 1997, the original Hayden Planetarium was closed and demolished. In August 1999, a new, customized Zeiss Mark IX projector was installed, accompanied by a digital dome projection system that provides a 3-D visualization of the universe based on images generated in real time by a Silicon Graphics supercomputer.

On February 19, 2000, the $210 million Frederick Phineas and Sandra Priest Rose Center for Earth and Space, containing the new Hayden Planetarium,[3] opened to the public. The Rose Center is named after two members of the Rose family, and was designed by James Polshek and Todd H. Schliemann of Polshek Partnership Architects with the exhibition design by Ralph Appelbaum Associates. Tom Hanks provided the voice-over for the first planetarium show during the opening of the new Rose Center for Earth & Space in the Hayden Planetarium in 2000. Since then such celebrities as Whoopi Goldberg, Robert Redford, Harrison Ford, Liam Neeson and Maya Angelou have been featured.

Design

Rose center scales of the universe
Back to front: the Hayden Sphere, the Heilbrun Cosmic Pathway, and the Scales of the Universe exhibit.
Amnh fg09
Close-up of the Scales of the Universe exhibit.
Rose Center for Earth and Space by Frederick Phineas and Sandra Priest, New York, 04003a
Hayden Sphere at night.
Hayden ball & disks jeh
The Hayden Sphere with the winding Cosmic Pathway helix.

Designed by Polshek and Todd Schliemann, the building consists of a six-story high glass cube enclosing the 87-foot (27 m) illuminated Hayden Sphere, which appears to float, although it is actually supported by truss work. Polshek has referred to this work as a "cosmic cathedral".[4]

The Rose Center and its adjacent plaza are both located on the north face of the Museum; the Center encloses 333,500 square feet (30,980 m2; 3.098 ha) of research, education, and exhibition spaces, in addition to the Hayden Planetarium. Also located in the facility is the Department of Astrophysics, the newest academic research department in the Museum. Furthermore, Polshek designed the 1,800-square-foot (170 m2) Weston Pavilion, a 43-foot (13 m) high transparent structure of "water white" glass along the Museum's west facade. This structure, a small companion piece to the Rose Center, offers a new entry way to the Museum, as well as opening further exhibition space for astronomically-related objects. The planetarium's original magazine, The Sky, merged with another journal, The Telescope, to become the leading astronomy magazine Sky & Telescope.[5]

The exhibits highlight human connection to the cosmos along with the scale and properties of the observable universe itself. When the new Rose Center opened with a model of only eight planets, excluding Pluto, which had been thought of as the ninth planet, it resulted in a headline-making controversy.[6]

Hayden Planetarium

The Hayden Planetarium (often called "The Hayden Sphere" or "The Great Sphere") has, since 2000, been one of the two main attractions within the Rose Center. It was established by the State of New York in 1933, some of the funding coming from philanthropist Charles Hayden.[7] The top half of the Hayden Sphere houses the Star Theater, which uses high-resolution fulldome video to project “space shows” based on scientific visualization of current astrophysical data, in addition to a customized Zeiss Star Projector system replicating an accurate night sky as seen from Earth. The Star Theater is one of the world's pre-eminent planetariums, which incorporates high-resolution full-dome video to create "space shows", based in scientific visualization of current astrophysical data.

The Big Bang Theater, which occupies the bottom half of the Hayden Sphere, depicts the birth of the universe in a four-minute program. Utilizing a screen that measures 36 feet (11 m) in diameter over an 8-foot-deep (2.4 m) bowl, a four-minute program depicts the birth of the universe, with narration by Liam Neeson. The Big Bang Theater serves as an introduction to the Heilbrun Cosmic Pathway, a spiral which wraps around the sphere, connecting the second and first floors of the Rose Center. The cosmic pathway provides a timeline of the universe's history from the Big Bang to the present day. The Heilbrun Cosmic Pathway is one of the most popular exhibits in the Rose Center, which opened February 19, 2000.[8]

The Hayden Planetarium offers a number of courses and public presentations including the Frontiers of Astrophysics and Distinguished Authors lecture series.

Arthur Ross Terrace

The Ross Terrace adjacent to the Rose Center for Earth and Space, and built over the new parking garage on 81st Street. This rooftop plaza is designed to be a stage set that celebrates both astronomy and Earth’s natural history, as well as an outdoor gathering place for museum visitors. Renowned garden designer Kathryn Gustafson formed the concept for the Terrace after seeing an illustration of shadows cast by a lunar eclipse. A terrace covering 47,114 square feet (4,377.0 m2; 0.43770 ha) was designed by Charles Morris Anderson as a Landscape Architect, and his design was awarded the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) Design award in 2003.

Current exhibits and shows

As of 2015, five shows have premiered in the theater. The first show, Passport to the Universe, opened with the new theater and features the voice of Tom Hanks as a guide along a voyage from Earth to the edge of the observable universe. The Search for Life: Are We Alone? debuted in 2002, with narration by Harrison Ford describing the possibilities of extraterrestrial life. Opened in 2006 and narrated by Robert Redford, Cosmic Collisions examines the role that impacts have played in shaping the universe—including visualizations of Earth's magnetosphere, the formation of the Moon, and the meteorite impact that contributed to the end of the age of dinosaurs. Journey to the Stars, narrated by Whoopi Goldberg, premiered on, July 4, 2009, featuring extraordinary images from telescopes on the ground and in space and stunning, never-before-seen visualizations of physics-based simulations. Dark Universe, narrated by Neil deGrasse Tyson, premiered on November 2, 2013.

Other exhibits can be found outside the sphere. The Gottesman Hall of the Planet Earth has displays that illustrate the Earth's geological history and weather patterns. The Cullman Hall of the Universe focuses on topics ranging from planets to stars, life on other worlds to current cosmology. The Scales of the Universe exhibit makes comparisons between the size of the Hayden Sphere and other objects in the universe presented at appropriate relative scale. There is also a photographic exhibit about the Apollo moon landings. The photographs are throughout the first floor level of the Rose Center.

In popular culture

See also

References

  1. ^ Gray, Christopher (1996-08-16). "A Remnant of the 1930s, and Its Sky, Will Fall". The New York Times. Retrieved 2009-03-18.
  2. ^ Martin, Douglas (December 11, 2011). "Joseph Chamberlain, 88, Dies; Brought the Stars a Bit Closer". New York Times. Retrieved 19 December 2011.
  3. ^ Goldberger, Paul (2000-01-17). "Stairway to the Stars". The New Yorker. Retrieved 2009-03-03.
  4. ^ Glancey, Jonathan (2000-05-08). "A cosmic cathedral on 81st Street". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 2009-03-18.
  5. ^ http://www.amnh.org/science/facilities/hayden.php
  6. ^ deGrasse Tyson, Neil (February 2, 2001). "Astronomer Responds to Pluto-Not-a-Planet Claim". Space.com. Retrieved 2013-07-17.
  7. ^ "History of the Hayden Planetarium". Archived from the original on March 6, 2006. Retrieved 2014-12-08.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link) Accessed 2008-02-19
  8. ^ "Timeline: The History of the American Museum of Natural History". Archived from the original on 2009-03-10. Retrieved 2009-03-03.

External links

Rose Center exhibitions

Hayden Planetarium

Arthur Ross Terrace

2000 in architecture

The year 2000 in architecture involved some significant architectural events and new buildings.

AMNH Exhibitions Lab

The AMNH Exhibitions Lab or AMNH Department of Exhibition is an interdisciplinary art and research team at the American Museum of Natural History that designs and produces museum installations, computer programs and film. Founded in 1869, the lab has since produced thousands of installations, many of which have become celebrated works. The department is notable for its integration of new scientific research into immersive art and multimedia presentations. In addition to the famous dioramas at its home museum and the Rose Center for Earth and Space, the lab has also produced international exhibitions and software such as the revolutionary Digital Universe Atlas.The exhibitions team currently consists of over sixty artists, writers, preparators, designers and programmers. The department is responsible for the creation of two to three exhibits per year, making the AMNH one of the most extensive exhibition creators in the world. These extensive shows typically travel nationally to sister natural history museums. Due to the strong relationship between the lab and the museum's extensive research and curation wing, the department has been among the first to introduce brand new topics to the public. They have produced, among others, the first exhibits to discuss Darwinian evolution, human-induced climate change and the mesozoic mass extinction via asteroid.

American Museum of Natural History

The American Museum of Natural History (abbreviated as AMNH), located on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City, is one of the largest natural history museums in the world. Located in Theodore Roosevelt Park across the street from Central Park, the museum complex comprises 28 interconnected buildings housing 45 permanent exhibition halls, in addition to a planetarium and a library. The museum collections contain over 33 million specimens of plants, animals, fossils, minerals, rocks, meteorites, human remains, and human cultural artifacts, of which only a small fraction can be displayed at any given time, and occupies more than 2 million square feet (0.19×10^6 m2). The museum has a full-time scientific staff of 225, sponsors over 120 special field expeditions each year, and averages about five million visits annually.The one mission statement of the American Museum of Natural History is: "To discover, interpret, and disseminate—through scientific research and education—knowledge about human cultures, the natural world, and the universe."

Children's Museum of Manhattan

The Children’s Museum of Manhattan was founded by Bette Korman, under the name GAME (Growth Through Art and Museum Experience), in 1973. With New York City in a deep fiscal crisis, and school art, music, and cultural programs eliminated, a loosely organized, group of artists and educators set up a basement storefront to serve Harlem and the Upper West Side. With a challenge grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, a city-owned courthouse was renovated into a small exhibition, studio, and workshop and renamed the Manhattan Laboratory Museum. The museum became the Children’s Museum of Manhattan in the 1980s and moved to its current location on West 83rd Street in 1989. Its audience has grown to 325,000 visitors each year, which includes 30,000 children who visit as part of a school group and more than 34,000 children served through offsite outreach programs.

Ennead Architects

Ennead Architects LLP (/ˈenēˌad/) is a New York City-based architectural firm. Previously known as Polshek Partnership, the firm's partners renamed their practice in mid-2010.The 175-person firm offers architecture, master planning, historic preservation and interior design services. The majority of the firm’s work is for cultural, educational, governmental, and scientific not-for-profit institutions.

The firm is presently led by twelve Partners: Timothy P. Hartung, Duncan Hazard, V. Guy Maxwell, Kevin McClurkan, Molly McGowan, Richard Olcott, Susan T. Rodriguez, Tomas Rossant, Todd Schliemann, Peter Schubert, Don Weinreich, and Thomas Wong, with the founder of the original Polshek Partnership James Polshek holding the title of Design Counsel and remaining actively involved on select projects.

The Partners established Ennead Architects International LLP in 2012, expanding the studio's geographical reach. In 2014, the firm established a Shanghai office.

The firm is a member of the United States Green Building Council, and twenty-five percent of registered architects on staff are LEED Accredited Professionals.

Forbes Galleries

The Forbes Galleries, housed within the Forbes Building on Fifth Avenue between West 12th and 13th Streets in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, United States, was the home of Malcolm Forbes' collection, which the Forbes family continued to exhibit following his death.The galleries closed in November 2014.The collection stemmed from Forbes' lifelong collection of toys, most of which have since been auctioned off. Among the museum's notable exhibits over time included "Olympic Gold", a collection of medals and other collectibles from some of the world's most accomplished Olympians, a number of Faberge Eggs, an armada of 500 ships and 12,000 toy soldiers and one of the original Monopoly boards.The museum was more popular with visitors than it was with New Yorkers.

FusionArts Museums

FusionArts Museum(s), first founded at 57 Stanton Street on Manhattan's Lower East Side are a series of curated exhibition spaces dedicated to the exhibition and archiving of "fusion art". The museum was and remains at its successive locations a not-for-profit gallery operated by Converging Arts Media Organization, a not-for-profit arts organization which promotes emerging American and international fusion artists. Though the initial space in Manhattan was converted into a commercial art gallery in 2012 and is currently not operating as a Fusionarts museum, other spaces in Prague, Czech, Republic and Easton, Pennsylvania are.

Girl Scout Museum and Archives

The Girl Scout Museum and Archives is part of the Girl Scout National Historic Preservation Center at the Girl Scouts headquarters located at 420 Fifth Avenue in New York City. It was founded in 1987 to promote and preserve scouting history and its collection dates back to 1912 when the Girl Scouts were founded. The museum holds more than 60,000 photos, 7,000 publications, 650 uniforms and an a/v collection dating back to 1918.

Glass mullion system

Glass mullion system or glass fin system is a glazing system in which sheets of tempered glass are suspended from special clamps, stabilized by perpendicular stiffeners of tempered glass, and joined by a structural silicone sealant or by metal patch plates.

List of buildings, sites, and monuments in New York City

Following is an alphabetical list of notable buildings, sites and monuments located in New York City in the United States. The borough is indicated in parentheses.

Malcolm X and Dr. Betty Shabazz Memorial and Educational Center

The Malcolm X and Dr. Betty Shabazz Memorial and Educational Center is a memorial to Malcolm X and Betty Shabazz located at 3940 Broadway and West 165th Street in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, the building which once housed the Audubon Ballroom, where Malcolm X was assassinated on February 21, 1965. It opened on May 19, 2005, the 80th anniversary of Malcolm X's birth.The stated purpose of the center is to carry on the work of Malcolm X and Betty Shabazz "through the advancement of human rights and social justice".The center is decorated with a 63-foot (19-meter) mural depicting the life of Malcolm X and a life-size bronze statue of the human rights activist. It includes six interactive kiosks that provide information about the lives of Malcolm X and Betty Shabazz. The kiosks were developed by Columbia University's Digital Knowledge Ventures and Professor Manning Marable of the university's African American Studies department. The center also is home to documents related to Malcolm X and Betty Shabazz.

Mmuseumm

Mmuseumm is a modern natural history museum located in lower Manhattan in New York City, dedicated to its signature curatorial style of "Object Journalism." The first two locations are on Cortlandt Alley between Franklin Street and White Street, sometimes known as Mmuseumm Alley. Mmuseumm is dedicated to the curation and exhibition of contemporary artifacts to illustrate the modern world. Mmuseumm's first wing, Mmuseumm 1, opened in 2012 in a former elevator shaft. The second wing, Mmuseumm 2, opened in 2015 three doors down. It was founded by Alex Kalman, son of Maira Kalman, and the Safdie brothers.

Museum of Arts and Design

The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD), based in Manhattan, New York City, collects, displays, and interprets objects that document contemporary and historic innovation in craft, art, and design. In its exhibitions and educational programs, the Museum celebrates the creative process through which materials are crafted into works that enhance contemporary life.

Museum of Primitive Art

The Museum of Primitive Art, is a now defunct museum devoted to the early arts of the indigenous cultures of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and Oceania. It was founded in 1954 by Nelson Rockefeller, who donated his own collection of Tribal art. The museum opened to the public in 1957 in a townhouse on at 15 West 54th Street in New York City. Robert Goldwater (1907–1973) was the museum’s first director. The museum closed in 1976, and its collections were transferred to the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Neil deGrasse Tyson

Neil deGrasse Tyson (; born October 5, 1958) is an American astrophysicist, author, and science communicator. Since 1996, he has been the Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium at the Rose Center for Earth and Space in New York City. The center is part of the American Museum of Natural History, where Tyson founded the Department of Astrophysics in 1997 and has been a research associate in the department since 2003.

Tyson studied at Harvard University, the University of Texas at Austin and Columbia University. From 1991 to 1994 he was a postdoctoral research associate at Princeton University. In 1994, he joined the Hayden Planetarium as a staff scientist and the Princeton faculty as a visiting research scientist and lecturer. In 1996, he became director of the planetarium and oversaw its $210 million reconstruction project, which was completed in 2000.

From 1995 to 2005, Tyson wrote monthly essays in the "Universe" column for Natural History magazine, some of which were later published in his books Death by Black Hole (2007) and Astrophysics for People in a Hurry (2017). During the same period, he wrote a monthly column in StarDate magazine, answering questions about the universe under the pen name "Merlin". Material from the column appeared in his books Merlin's Tour of the Universe (1998) and Just Visiting This Planet (1998). Tyson served on a 2001 government commission on the future of the U.S. aerospace industry, and on the 2004 Moon, Mars and Beyond commission. He was awarded the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal in the same year. From 2006 to 2011, he hosted the television show NOVA ScienceNow on PBS. Since 2009, Tyson has hosted the weekly podcast StarTalk. A spin-off, also called StarTalk, began airing on National Geographic in 2015. In 2014, he hosted the television series Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey, a successor to Carl Sagan's 1980 series Cosmos: A Personal Voyage. The U.S. National Academy of Sciences awarded Tyson the Public Welfare Medal in 2015 for his "extraordinary role in exciting the public about the wonders of science."

Nicholas Roerich Museum, New York City

The Nicholas Roerich Museum in New York City is dedicated to the works of Nicholas Roerich, a Russian-born artist whose work focused on nature scenes from the Himalayas. The museum is located in a brownstone at 319 West 107th Street on Manhattan's Upper West Side. The museum was originally located in the Master Apartments at 103rd Street and Riverside Drive, which were built especially for Roerich in 1929.Currently, the museum includes between 100 and 200 of Roerich's works as well as a collection of archival materials and still attracts pilgrims from throughout the world. The mission of the Nicholas Roerich Museum is essentially a narrow one: to make available to the public the full range of Roerich’s accomplishments. These, however, are not narrow; they cover the realms of art, science, spirituality, peacemaking, and more. Because Roerich’s activities ranged widely, so do the Museum’s.

Ralph Appelbaum Associates

Ralph Appelbaum Associates (RAA) is one of the world's largest museum exhibition design firms. It has offices in New York City, London, Beijing, Berlin, Moscow, and Dubai.

Stephen Endelman

Stephen Endelman is a British born classical composer and conductor. He is best known for his soundtracks including The Englishman Who Went Up a Hill But Came Down a Mountain (1995), Ed (1996), City of Industry (1997), Finding Graceland (1998), The Proposition (1998), Jawbreaker (1999), Evelyn (2002), Home of the Brave (2006) and Redbelt (2008). He wrote the Grammy nominated score for De-Lovely (2004) and the incidental music for the Rose Center for Earth and Space at The American Museum of Natural History.

Yeshiva University Museum

The Yeshiva University Museum is a teaching museum and the cultural arm of Yeshiva University. Along with the American Jewish Historical Society, the American Sephardi Federation, the Leo Baeck Institute, New York and the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, it is a member organization of the Center for Jewish History, a Smithsonian Institution affiliate located in New York’s Chelsea neighborhood.

Museums in Manhattan
Financial District and Battery Park
(Below Chambers St)
Lower Manhattan
(Chambers-14th Sts)
Chelsea, Flatiron, Gramercy
(14th-34th Sts)
Midtown
(34th-59th Sts)
Upper West Side
(59th-125th Sts west of 5th Av)
Upper East Side and East Harlem
(59th-125th Sts along or east of 5th Av)
Upper Manhattan
(Above 125th St)
Islands
Defunct

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