Ronnie Lippett

Ronald Leon Lippett (born December 10, 1960) is a former American professional football player who played eight seasons with the New England Patriots of the National Football League from 1983–1991. A 5'11", 180 lbs. cornerback from the University of Miami (FL), Lippett was selected by the Patriots in the eighth round of the 1983 NFL Draft.

Ronnie was named the "AFC Defensive Player of the Week" as he intercepted Dan Marino twice in the Patriots 34–7 rout of the Miami Dolphins @ Sullivan Stadium on 10-05-86.

Ronnie blocked an extra point attempt by Pat Leahy in the Patriots 23–13 win over the New York Jets @ Sullivan Stadium on 9-18-83.

He recovered a fumble by Paul McDonald that helped set up the final TD in the Patriots 17–16 win over the Cleveland Browns on 10-07-84.

Ronnie returned a pass by Art Schlitcher 13 yards, with 36 seconds left, in the Patriots 16–10 win over the Colts @ Sullivan Stadium on 12-16-84.

He intercepted Joe Ferguson twice in the Patriots 38–10 rout of the Buffalo Bills @ Sullivan Stadium on 11-11-84. He intercepted Dan Marino twice in the Patriots 34–7 rout of Miami @ Sullivan on 10-05-86. He intercepted Dan Marino twice in their 27–24 loss to the Dolphins @ Foxboro Stadium on 09-09-90. Ronnie intercepted Jim Kelly and Frank Reich in the Patriots 23–3 rout of the Buffalo Bills @ Rich Stadium on 10-26-86.

Ronnie intercepted Marc Wilson twice in the Patriots 27–20 AFC Playoff Game victory over the Los Angeles Raiders @ the LA Coliseum on 01-05-86.

Ronnie was awarded the Patriots UNSUNG Hero Award after the 1987 season.

He recovered an onside kick by Dean Biasucci in the Patriots 16–14 win over the Colts on 09-16-90.

Ronnie started in 111 of his 122 regular season games for the New England Patriots and started in 4 Playoff Games.

Ronnie attended Sebring High School in Sebring, FL. He currently lives in South Easton, Massachusetts.

Ronnie Lippett hated the Dolphins ever since an incident when he visited a Dolphins training as a university student. Of his 24 career interceptions, 7 of them were Dan Marino passes.[1]

Ronnie Lippett
No. 42
Position:Cornerback
Personal information
Born:December 10, 1960 (age 58)
Melbourne, Florida
Height:5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Weight:180 lb (82 kg)
Career information
College:Miami (FL)
NFL Draft:1983 / Round: 8 / Pick: 214
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Games:122
Sacks:1.0
Interceptions:24
Fumbles:8

References

  1. ^ http://www.patriots.com/search/index.cfm?ac=searchdetail&pid=31603&pcid=48
1980 Miami Hurricanes football team

The 1980 Miami Hurricanes football team represented the University of Miami during the 1980 NCAA Division I-A football season. It was the Hurricanes' 55th season of football. The Hurricanes were led by second-year head coach Howard Schnellenberger and played their home games at the Orange Bowl. They finished the season 9–3 overall. They were invited to the Peach Bowl where they defeated Virginia Tech, 20-10.

1981 Miami Hurricanes football team

The 1981 Miami Hurricanes football team represented the University of Miami during the 1981 NCAA Division I-A football season. It was the Hurricanes' 56th season of football. The Hurricanes were led by third-year head coach Howard Schnellenberger and played their home games at the Orange Bowl. They finished the season 9–2 overall.

1982 Miami Hurricanes football team

The 1982 Miami Hurricanes football team represented the University of Miami during the 1982 NCAA Division I-A football season. It was the Hurricanes' 57th season of football. The Hurricanes were led by fourth-year head coach Howard Schnellenberger and played their home games at the Orange Bowl. They finished the season 7–4 overall.

1983 NFL Draft

The 1983 NFL Draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held April 26–27, 1983, at the New York Sheraton Hotel in New York City, New York. No teams elected to claim any players in the supplemental draft that year.

The draft is frequently referred to as the quarterback class of 1983, because six quarterbacks were taken in the first round—John Elway, Todd Blackledge, Jim Kelly, Tony Eason, Ken O'Brien, and Dan Marino—the highest number of first round picks for the position. Of these quarterbacks, Elway, Kelly, Eason, and Marino played in the Super Bowl, Elway, Kelly, O'Brien, and Marino were selected to play in the Pro Bowl, and Elway, Kelly, and Marino have been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. All six quarterbacks were drafted by American Football Conference (AFC) teams, with every member of the five-team AFC East (the Baltimore Colts, Miami Dolphins, Buffalo Bills, New York Jets, and New England Patriots) selecting a quarterback. In eleven of the sixteen years following this draft, the AFC was represented in the Super Bowl by a team led by one of these quarterbacks: five with the Denver Broncos and Elway, four with the Bills and Kelly, one with the Dolphins and Marino, and one with the Patriots and Eason.

They met with little success in the Super Bowl, however, compiling a 2–9 record among them, with an 0–9 record for their first 14 years in the league. The only two wins were by Elway in XXXII and XXXIII during his final two seasons in 1997 and 1998. Three of the most lopsided Super Bowl losses in history also came at the hands of quarterbacks from the Class of '83: Elway, a 55–10 loss to the San Francisco 49ers in XXIV; Eason, a 46–10 loss to the Chicago Bears in XX; and Kelly, a 52–17 loss to the Dallas Cowboys in XXVII. Marino would only reach the Super Bowl once in a 38–16 loss to San Francisco in XIX following the end of Marino's second season. Kelly and the Bills would appear in the Super Bowl for a record four consecutive years, from 1990 to 1993, but lost all four.

Of the six first round quarterbacks drafted, Hall of Famers Elway and Kelly did not sign with the teams that selected them for the 1983 season. Elway, who had made his antipathy towards the Colts known long before the draft, was also a promising baseball player in the New York Yankees organization. With Yankees owner George Steinbrenner aggressively pursuing a commitment from Elway to play baseball full-time, Elway and his agent, Marvin Demoff, successfully leveraged the threat of Elway abandoning football altogether to compel the Colts to trade Elway to the Broncos a few days after the draft.Kelly, the other holdout, instead signed with the Houston Gamblers of the United States Football League (USFL), where he led the springtime circuit in passing in both 1984 and 1985. Kelly was set to play for the New Jersey Generals when the USFL planned to switch to a fall season in 1986, but when the USFL won only $1 (trebled to $3) from its antitrust lawsuit vs. the NFL on July 29, 1986, Kelly finally signed with the Bills three weeks later.

Including the aforementioned Elway, Kelly, and Marino, a total of six players drafted in the first round have been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame and seven players overall have been inducted. Each round of this draft also contained at least one player who was later selected to play in the Pro Bowl. Bleacher Report named the 1983 draft class as the "greatest of all time".

1983 New England Patriots season

The 1983 New England Patriots season was the franchise's 14th season in the National Football League and 24th overall. The Patriots played inconsistently all season, but at 8–7 had a chance for a playoff spot with a win in their final game of the season in Seattle. The Patriots would have problems with turnovers as rookie quarterback Tony Eason was swallowed up in a 24–6 loss to the Seahawks.

In the first week of December, in shocking conditions with sleet and snow, the Patriots’ game with wild card contender New Orleans Saints saw just one score set up by Ricky Smith returning the Saints’ initial kickoff to the 3-yard line. As of 2017, this game remains the most recent 7–0 result in NFL history, with only two games since seeing just one score, both a single field goal.

1984 New England Patriots season

The New England Patriots season was the franchise's 15th season in the National Football League and 25th overall. The Patriots finished the season with a record of nine wins and seven losses, and finished second in the AFC East Division.

Head coach Ron Meyer, who had coached the Patriots for the previous two seasons, was fired halfway through the season. Meyer had angered several of his players with public criticism. After a 44–22 loss to Miami in Week 8, Meyer fired popular defensive coordinator Rod Rust; Meyer himself was fired by Patriots management shortly thereafter.The Patriots went outside the organization to hire Raymond Berry, who had been New England's receivers coach from 1978 to 1981 under coaches Chuck Fairbanks and Ron Erhardt. Berry had been working in the private sector in Medfield, Massachusetts, when the Patriots called him to replace Meyer. Berry's first order of business was to immediately rehire Rust.

Under Berry's leadership, the Patriots won four of their last eight games. Berry's importance to the team was reflected less in his initial win-loss record than in the respect he immediately earned in the locker room – "Raymond Berry earned more respect in one day than Ron Meyer earned in three years," according to running back Tony Collins.

1985 New England Patriots season

The 1985 New England Patriots season was the franchise's 16th season in the National Football League and 26th overall. The Patriots had a record of eleven wins and five losses and finished tied for second in the AFC East Division. They then became the first team in NFL history ever to advance to the Super Bowl by winning 3 playoff games on the road, defeating the New York Jets 26–14, the Los Angeles Raiders, 27–20, and the Miami Dolphins 31–14, in the AFC Championship game. The Patriots' win in Miami was their first victory in that stadium since 1969. The win over the Dolphins in the game has gone down as one of the greatest upsets in NFL history, as the Dolphins were heavily favored.

But despite the Patriots' success in the playoffs, they proved unable to compete with the acclaimed 15–1 Chicago Bears in Super Bowl XX, losing 10–46 in what was at the time the most lopsided defeat in Super Bowl history.

"We couldn't protect the quarterback, and that was my fault. I couldn't come up with a system to handle the Bears' pass rush," head coach Raymond Berry acknowledged.

1985–86 NFL playoffs

The National Football League playoffs for the 1985 season began on December 28, 1985. The postseason tournament concluded with the Chicago Bears defeating the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XX, 46–10, on January 26, 1986, at the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Because the Jets and Giants both used Giants Stadium as their home field, the two wild card playoff games were held on different days.

1986 New England Patriots season

The 1986 New England Patriots season was the franchise's 17th season in the National Football League and 27th overall. The Patriots matched their 11-5 record from the previous season, but this time they finished first in the AFC East, thus winning the division title. This would be the last AFC East Division title the Patriots would win until 1996.

1987 New England Patriots season

The 1987 New England Patriots season was the franchise's 18th season in the National Football League and 28th overall. They failed to improve on their 11-5 record from 1986, in the strike-shortened and finishing at 8-7 and missed the playoffs for the first time since 1984, and finished tied for second in the AFC East Division.

1988 All-Pro Team

The 1988 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly and The Sporting News in 1988. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1988 the Associated Press did not choose a kick returner.

1988 New England Patriots season

The 1988 New England Patriots season was the franchise's 19th season in the National Football League, the 29th overall and the 5th under head coach Raymond Berry, with a record of nine wins and seven losses, and finished tied for second in the AFC East Division. It would take until 1994 for the Patriots to record another winning record. As for this season, the Patriots briefly improved on its 8-7 record from 1987, winning one more game due to one game being cancelled the previous season. Despite the winning record, the Patriots did not reach the postseason. They finished tied for second place in the AFC East with the arch rival Colts, but finished in 3rd place because the Colts had a better record against common opponents than the Patriots did.

1990 New England Patriots season

The 1990 New England Patriots season was the team's 31st, and 21st in the National Football League. It was the first and only season for head coach Rod Rust. The Patriots finished the season with a record of 1–15, the worst record in franchise history. They finished last in the AFC East Division and dead last in the NFL. The roster still had a number of All-Pros and regular contributors from their successful teams of the 1980s, but many of them were past the peak of their career, and the team lacked any young talent to replace them. After the team started 1-1, they would go on to lose their next 14 games, many in humiliating fashion. Off the field, the team and its management were embarrassed by the harassment of a reporter during a locker room interview.

1991 New England Patriots season

The 1991 season New England Patriots season was the team's 32nd, and 22nd in the National Football League. The team finished the season with a record of six wins and ten losses, and finished fourth in the AFC East Division. Though the Patriots scored twenty or more points just five times during the season, they were able to upset playoff teams such as the Houston Oilers, Buffalo Bills and New York Jets.

It was the last season where the Patriots were owned by Victor Kiam, who was forced to sell the team to St. Louis businessman James Orthwein in order to settle a debt.

Easton, Massachusetts

Easton is a town in Bristol County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 23,112 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Greater Boston area, but is also part of the 6-county definition of the Providence MSA.

Easton is governed by an elected Board of Selectmen. Open Town Meeting acts as the legislative branch of the town. The Selectman choose a Town Administrator to run the day-to-day operations of the town.

Miami Hurricanes football statistical leaders

The Miami Hurricanes football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Miami Hurricanes football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Hurricanes represent the University of Miami in the NCAA's Atlantic Coast Conference.

Miami began competing in intercollegiate football in 1926, but these lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1926, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002.. The Hurricanes have played in 12 bowl games since this decision, giving many recent players an extra game to accumulate statistics.These lists are updated through the end of the 2016 season.

Sebring, Florida

Sebring ( SEE-bring) is a city in Highlands County, Florida, United States, nicknamed "The City on the Circle", in reference to Circle Drive, the center of the Sebring Downtown Historic District. As of the 2010 census the population was 10,491. It is the county seat of Highlands County, and is the principal city of the Sebring Metropolitan Statistical Area.Sebring is the home of the Sebring International Raceway, created on a former airbase, first used in 1950. It hosted the 1959 Formula One United States Grand Prix, but is currently best known as the host of the 12 Hours of Sebring, an annual WeatherTech SportsCar Championship race. Nearby Highlands Hammock State Park is a popular attraction. Additionally, the house where novelist Rex Beach committed suicide is located on one of Sebring's main lakes, Lake Jackson.

Super Bowl XX

Super Bowl XX was an American football game between the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Chicago Bears and the American Football Conference (AFC) champion New England Patriots to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1985 season. The Bears defeated the Patriots by the score of 46–10, capturing their first NFL championship (and Chicago's first overall sports victory) since 1963, three years prior to the birth of the Super Bowl. Super Bowl XX was played on January 26, 1986 at the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans.

This was the fourth Super Bowl where both teams were making their Super Bowl debuts. The Bears entered the game after becoming the second team in NFL history to win 15 regular season games. With their then-revolutionary 46 defense, Chicago led the league in several defensive categories, outscored their opponents with a staggering margin of 456–198, and recorded two postseason shutouts. The Patriots were considered a Cinderella team during the 1985 season, and posted an 11–5 regular season record, but entered the playoffs as a wild card because of tiebreakers. But defying the odds, New England posted three road playoff wins to advance to Super Bowl XX.

In their victory over the Patriots, the Bears set or tied Super Bowl records for sacks (seven), fewest rushing yards allowed (seven), and margin of victory (36 points). At the time, New England broke the record for the quickest lead in Super Bowl history, with Tony Franklin's 36-yard field goal 1:19 into the first quarter after a Chicago fumble. But the Patriots were eventually held to negative yardage (−19) throughout the entire first half, and finished with just 123 total yards from scrimmage, the second lowest total yards in Super Bowl history, behind the Minnesota Vikings (119 total yards) in Super Bowl IX. Bears defensive end Richard Dent, who had 1.5 quarterback sacks, forced two fumbles, and blocked a pass, was named the game's Most Valuable Player (MVP).The telecast of the game on NBC was watched by an estimated 92.57 million viewers. To commemorate the 20th Super Bowl, all previous Super Bowl MVPs were honored during the pregame ceremonies.

Tony Lippett

Tony Lippett (born July 2, 1992) is an American football cornerback for the New York Giants of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Michigan State, and was drafted by the Miami Dolphins in the fifth round of the 2015 NFL Draft.

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