Ron Oester

Ronald John Oester (born May 5, 1956) is a former Major League Baseball second baseman. He played his entire MLB career with the Cincinnati Reds from 1978 to 1990. He is a native of Cincinnati. [1]

Ron Oester
Second baseman
Born: May 5, 1956 (age 63)
Cincinnati, Ohio
Batted: Switch Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 10, 1978, for the Cincinnati Reds
Last MLB appearance
October 3, 1990, for the Cincinnati Reds
MLB statistics
Batting average.265
Home runs42
Runs batted in344
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Baseball Career

Drafted by the Cincinnati Reds in the 9th round of the 1974 MLB amateur draft, Oester made his debut with the Reds on September 10, 1978, and appeared in his final game on October 3, 1990. He finished fourth in the Rookie of the Year voting in 1980. [2]

Oester was one of the few major leaguers who did not wear batting gloves. He perpetually developed blisters on his hands, and according to teammates, they would develop into deep wounds on his palms.

In 1984 Oester had a career best 21 game hitting streak. In 1985 he had a .295 batting average, a career high.

On July 5, 1987, during a Mets-Reds game at Riverfront Stadium, the New York Mets' Mookie Wilson slid hard into second base during a double-play attempt. During the slide, Oester, who was playing second, collided with Wilson. His cleats got caught in the turf, and he tore his left ACL. Oester did not return to action until July 16, 1988. For his comeback from this injury, Oester earned the Hutch Award.[3]

Oester was a member of the Cincinnati Reds team that defeated the Oakland Athletics in the 1990 World Series. Although he lost the starting second baseman job to Mariano Duncan that season, Oester was one of the team's top pinch hitters, hitting .299 that season and going 2-for-4 (.500) in the postseason. His final major league plate appearance was a hit that drove in Joe Oliver in Game 2 of the 1990 World Series, keeping the Reds in the game, a game they would go on to win in 10 innings.

Bill James described him as "a quiet, efficient player who was always overlooked".[4] Oester ended his career with a WAR of 10.9 and a batting average of .265 [5]

Post Career

In 2001, while serving as the Reds third base coach, Oester was offered the job of manager of the club. As the offer was below the market average, Oester turned it down. [6]

Withrow High School, which Oester attended, renovated and renamed its field in honor of him. [3]

Oester was inducted into the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame in 2014 [3]

See also

References

  1. ^ http://www.newsandsentinel.com/sports/local-sports/2016/06/former-red-ron-oester-was-nearly-a-pioneer/
  2. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/awards/awards_1980.shtml#all_NL_ROY_voting
  3. ^ a b c http://www.wcpo.com/sports/baseball/reds/ron-oester-reds-hall-of-famer-humbled-by-new-high-school-field-in-his-name
  4. ^ James, Bill (2003-04-06). The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract. New York: Free Press. p. 531. ISBN 0743227220.
  5. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/players/o/oestero01.shtml
  6. ^ http://abcnews.go.com/Sports/story?id=100213&page=1

External links

1979 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1979 Cincinnati Reds season consisted of the Reds winning the National League West under their first-year manager John McNamara, with a record of 90-71, 1½ games better than the Houston Astros. It was a year of great change for the Reds, who lost long-time star Pete Rose to the Philadelphia Phillies, who signed Rose as an unrestricted free agent. Also, long-time manager and future Hall of Famer Sparky Anderson was fired by new general manager Dick Wagner when Anderson refused to make changes in his coaching staff. McNamara guided the Reds to its first West Division title in three years. Wagner replaced long-time GM Bob Howsam, who retired after running the Reds for 12 years. Through some good drafts and several key trades, Howsam built a team that won six division titles, and played in four World Series, winning two, during the 1970s.

However, the Reds lost the National League Championship Series to the eventual World Series champion Pittsburgh Pirates in three straight games. It was the first time in four tries the Pirates had upended the Reds in a divisional playoff series since Major League Baseball went to divisions in 1969. The Reds played their home games at Riverfront Stadium.

1981 Cincinnati Reds season

The Cincinnati Reds' 1981 season consisted of the Reds finishing with an overall record of 66-42 the National League West, putting them in first place. However, due to a split-season format, caused by a mid-season players' strike, they failed to make the MLB Playoffs that year beause they did not finish first in either half of the season. The Reds finished the first half of the season in second place with a record of 35-21, just one-half game behind the eventual World Champion Los Angeles Dodgers, and one-and-a-half games behind the Houston Astros in the second half, in which the Reds were 31-21, good for second place, again. The Reds were managed by John McNamara and played their home games at Riverfront Stadium.

1983 Cincinnati Reds season

The Cincinnati Reds' 1983 season was a season in American baseball. It consisted of the Cincinnati Reds attempting to win the National League West. It was Johnny Bench's last season as a Red.

1984 Cincinnati Reds season

The Cincinnati Reds' 1984 season consisted of the Cincinnati Reds attempting to win the National League West. It marked the return of Bob Howsam as General Manager, after Dick Wagner was fired during the 1983 season. The Reds finished in fifth place that year, as they escaped last place in the NL West, which the team had finished in 1982 and 1983.

1985 Cincinnati Reds season

The Cincinnati Reds' 1985 season consisted of the Cincinnati Reds attempting to win the National League West. The Reds finished in second place, 5½ games behind the Los Angeles Dodgers. This year, the Reds adopted an alternate uniform. Reds pitcher Tom Browning became the last 20th Century pitcher to win 20 games in his rookie year.

1986 Cincinnati Reds season

The Cincinnati Reds' 1986 season was a season in American baseball. It consisted of the Cincinnati Reds attempting to win the National League West, although falling short in second place behind the Houston Astros.

1987 Cincinnati Reds season

The Cincinnati Reds' 1987 season consisted of the Cincinnati Reds attempting to win the National League West. The Reds finished in 2nd place with a record of 84-78.

1988 Cincinnati Reds season

The Cincinnati Reds' 1988 season was a season in American baseball. It consisted of the Cincinnati Reds attempting to win the National League West. Led by manager Pete Rose, the Reds had a record of 87 wins and 74 losses, finishing seven games back of the eventual World Series champion Los Angeles Dodgers. The 1988 season would be Pete Rose's last full season as Reds manager.

1990 Cincinnati Reds season

The Cincinnati Reds' 1990 season was the Reds' 122nd season in American baseball. Starting with a club best nine straight wins to open the season, as well as holding the top spot in the National League West every game during the season, the Reds went 41-21 after 62 games, splitting the remaining 100 games 50-50 to end up with a 91-71 record. It consisted of the 91-71 Reds winning the National League West by five games over the second-place Dodgers, as well as the National League Championship Series in six games over the Pittsburgh Pirates, and the World Series in a four-game sweep over the overwhelming favorite Oakland Athletics, who had won the World Series the previous year. It was the fifth World Championship for the Reds, and their first since winning two consecutive titles in 1975 and '76.

1993 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1993 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. It consisted of the Cincinnati Reds attempting to win the National League West.

1996 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1996 followed the system in use since 1995. The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players but no one tallied the necessary 75% support.

The BBWAA had petitioned the Hall of Fame Board of Directors on January 5, 1995, to reconsider the eligibility of Larry Bowa, Bill Madlock, Al Oliver and Ted Simmons, each of whom had failed to receive at least 5% of ballots cast in each of their first years of eligibility (Bowa and Oliver in 1991, Maddlock in 1993 and Simmons in 1994). The Board approved, but before the ballot was released, the BBWAA decided not to include them on the ballot after all.

The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions and selected four people from multiple classified ballots: Jim Bunning, Bill Foster, Ned Hanlon, and Earl Weaver.

2000 Cincinnati Reds season

The Cincinnati Reds' 2000 season was a season in American baseball. It consisted of the Cincinnati Reds attempting to win the National League Central, although coming short at 2nd place. They had 85 wins and 77 losses. They were only the 2nd team in the modern era of baseball to not be shut out an entire season.The Reds were managed by Jack McKeon.

Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame and Museum

The Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame and Museum is an entity established by Major League Baseball's Cincinnati Reds franchise that pays homage to the team's past through displays, photographs and multimedia. It was instituted in 1958 to recognize the career of former Cincinnati Reds players, managers and front-office executives. It is adjacent to Great American Ball Park on the banks of the Ohio River. Currently, the Hall of Fame section is home to 81 inductees. These inductees include players, managers & executives who were involved in Cincinnati's baseball legacy, which dates back to 1869, the year the original Cincinnati Red Stockings took the field. Inductions take place every other year.

Hal Pennington

Hal Pennington is a former American athletics coach. He was the founder and first head coach of the AFL II Cincinnati Bengals. He also had a 33-year career in amateur baseball, winning four National Amateur Baseball Federation World Series titles.

Hutch Award

The Hutch Award is given annually to an active Major League Baseball (MLB) player who "best exemplifies the fighting spirit and competitive desire" of Fred Hutchinson, by persevering through adversity. The award was created in 1965 in honor of Hutchinson, the former MLB pitcher and manager, who died of lung cancer the previous year. The Hutch Award was created by Hutch's longtime friends Bob Prince, a broadcaster for the Pittsburgh Pirates and KDKA; Jim Enright, a Chicago sportswriter; and Ritter Collett, the sports editor of the Dayton Journal Herald. They also created a scholarship fund for medical students engaged in cancer research to honor Hutchinson's memory.Eleven members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame have won the Hutch Award. The inaugural winner was Mickey Mantle. Danny Thompson, the 1974 recipient, was diagnosed with leukemia earlier that year. He continued to play through the 1976 season before dying that December at the age of 29. Jon Lester won the award in 2008 after recovering from anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.The award is presented annually at the Hutch Award Luncheon hosted by the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington, at Safeco Field. The award was originally presented at the annual Dapper Dan Banquet in Pittsburgh. Each winner receives a copy of the original trophy, designed by Dale Chihuly. The permanent display of the Hutch Award is at the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, where it has been since 1979.

List of Major League Baseball career putouts as a second baseman leaders

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by a Tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a Force out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference.

In baseball and softball, second baseman is a fielding position in the infield, between third and first base. The second baseman often possesses quick hands and feet, needs the ability to get rid of the ball quickly, and must be able to make the pivot on a double play. In addition, second basemen are usually right-handed; only four left-handed throwing players have ever played second base since 1950. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the second baseman is assigned the number 4.

Bid McPhee is the all-time leader in career putouts as a second baseman with 6,552. Eddie Collins (6,526) and Nellie Fox (6,090) are the only other second basemen with over 6,000 career putouts.

Tigres de Aragua

The Tigres de Aragua (English: Aragua Tigers) is a baseball team that plays in the Venezuelan Professional Baseball League and represents the state of Aragua.

Founded in 1965, the Tigres plays its home games at the Estadio José Pérez Colmenares in Maracay. The team won the Venezuelan National Series Championship for the third time in 2009, by defeating the Leones del Caracas at the UCV Stadium, 7–2, in the seventh game of a best-of-seven series. This championship made it their third in a row and eighth in history, including five of the prior six years.

The Tigres won their first Caribbean World Series title in 2009. Their most recent championship was in the 2015–2016 season, when they defeated Navegantes del Magallanes in six playoff games.

Withrow High School

Withrow High School (originally East Side High School) is a public high school located on the east side of Cincinnati, Ohio. It is part of the Cincinnati Public Schools.

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