Ron Cey

Ronald Charles Cey (/ˈseɪ/; born February 15, 1948) is an American former professional baseball player, a third baseman in the major leagues. He played for the Los Angeles Dodgers (1971–82), Chicago Cubs (1983–86), and Oakland Athletics (1987). Cey batted and threw right-handed; a popular player, he was nicknamed "The Penguin" for his slow waddling running gait by his college coach, Chuck "Bobo" Brayton.[1][2]

Ron Cey
CeyRon
Third baseman
Born: February 15, 1948 (age 71)
Tacoma, Washington
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 3, 1971, for the Los Angeles Dodgers
Last MLB appearance
July 12, 1987, for the Oakland Athletics
MLB statistics
Batting average.261
Home runs316
Runs batted in1,139
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Early years

Born and raised in Tacoma, Washington, Cey was a multi-sport athlete at Mount Tahoma High School, its first to earn nine varsity letters.[2] Following graduation in 1966, he attended Washington State University in Pullman and was a member of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity. Cey played two years of college baseball for the Cougars, on the freshman team in 1967, and a year on the varsity under head coach Brayton in 1968.[1][2][3] He was selected in the second phase of the 1968 MLB draft in June.[4]

Professional career

With the Dodgers, third baseman Cey was part of an All-Star infield that included Steve Garvey (first baseman), Davey Lopes (second baseman) and Bill Russell (shortstop). The four infielders stayed together as the Dodgers' starters for eight and a half years. In 1977, he was named NL Player of the Month in April after helping the Dodgers to a fast start by batting .425 with 9 home runs and a ML record 29 RBIs for the month of April.[5] The Dodgers won the Western Division title that season on their way to the National League pennant.

Ron cey poster

Cey continued to have productive seasons with the Dodgers, helping them to pennants in 1978 and 1981. After the 1982 season, the Dodgers traded Cey to the Chicago Cubs for two minor leaguers so that Pedro Guerrero could move to third base and rookie Mike Marshall could get in the Dodgers' outfield. Cey provided veteran leadership for the Cubs over four seasons and, in 1984, helped lead the Cubs to the National League East Division title, hitting 25 homers and driving in 97 runs, both team highs. Cey spent the final year of his career in 1987 as a part-time player with the Oakland A's.

In a 16-season career, Cey was a .261 hitter with 316 home runs and 1139 RBI in 2073 games.

Cey finished in the top 25 voting for National League Most Valuable Player Award, four times with the Los Angeles Dodgers (1974-1977) and once with the Chicago Cubs (1984). In 1973, he finished sixth in National League Rookie of the Year voting.[6]

Cey played in the 1981 World Series, helping the Dodgers to four straight victories after losing their first two games, including his return for the clinching Game 6 after being hit in the head by a wild Goose Gossage fastball, and helped off the field in Game 5. Cey was named co-MVP along with Steve Yeager and Pedro Guerrero, and won the annual Babe Ruth Award.[7] He is still a part of the Dodgers organization and continues to make appearances on the team's behalf.

Career Hitting[8]
G AB H 2B 3B HR R RBI SB BB SO AVG OBP SLG OPS
2,073 7,162 1,868 328 21 316 977 1,139 24 1,012 1,235 .261 .354 .445 .799

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Bolton, Barry (March 24, 2010). "Ron Cey sets record straight on 'The Penguin'". Coug Fan. Retrieved September 25, 2014.
  2. ^ a b c "Flashback: Ron Cey, Mount Tahoma, Class of 1966". Seattle Times. May 11, 2004. Retrieved September 25, 2014.
  3. ^ "Washington State University Baseball Players Who Made It to the Major Leagues". Baseball-Almanac.com. Archived from the original on 12 August 2004. Retrieved 16 December 2012.
  4. ^ "Draft tabs Pac-8 stars". Spokane Daily Chronicle. June 8, 1968. p. 8.
  5. ^ "Montreal Expos at Los Angeles Dodgers Box Score, April 30, 1977 - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com.
  6. ^ "Ron Cey Stats - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com.
  7. ^ "Babe Ruth Award on Baseball Almanac". www.baseball-almanac.com.
  8. ^ Baseball-Reference.com.

External links

Preceded by
Steve Garvey
National League Player of the Month
April, 1977
Succeeded by
Ken Reitz
1966 Major League Baseball draft

The 1966 Major League Baseball (MLB) draft took place prior to the 1966 MLB season. The draft saw the New York Mets take Steve Chilcott first overall, with future Hall of Famer Reggie Jackson drafted second.

1973 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1973 Los Angeles Dodgers finished the season in second place in the Western Division of the National League with a record of 95-66.

1974 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1974 Los Angeles Dodgers won the National League West by four games over the Cincinnati Reds, then beat the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 1974 National League Championship Series before losing to the Oakland Athletics in the 1974 World Series.

1974 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1974 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 45th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 23, 1974, at Three Rivers Stadium in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania the home of the Pittsburgh Pirates of the National League. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 7–2.

This marked the third time the Pirates had been host for the All-Star Game (the first two having been in 1944 and the first game in 1959). This would be the first of two times that the game would be played at Three Rivers Stadium, with the stadium hosting again in 1994.

1975 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1975 Los Angeles Dodgers finished in second place, 20 games behind the Cincinnati Reds in the Western Division of the National League.

1976 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1976 Los Angeles Dodgers finished the season in second place in the western division of the National League. The big news was when long-time manager of two decades Walter Alston resigned abruptly near the end of the season and was replaced by Tommy Lasorda who would manage the team for two decades himself.

1977 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1977 Los Angeles Dodgers season saw Tommy Lasorda in his first full season at the helm of the Dodgers, replacing longtime manager Walter Alston as Manager of the team near the end of the previous season. The Dodgers won the National League West by 10 games and defeated the Philadelphia Phillies in four games in the NLCS, then lost to the New York Yankees in the World Series. This edition of the Dodgers featured the first quartet of teammates that hit 30 or more home runs: Steve Garvey with 33, Reggie Smith with 32, and Dusty Baker and Ron Cey, who both hit 30. The Dodgers duplicated this feat again 20 years later in 1997.

1977 National League Championship Series

The 1977 National League Championship Series was a best-of-five matchup between the West Division champion Los Angeles Dodgers and the East Division champion Philadelphia Phillies. The Dodgers beat the Phillies three games to one and went on to lose the 1977 World Series to the New York Yankees.

1977 World Series

The 1977 World Series was the 74th edition of Major League Baseball's (MLB) championship series. The best-of-seven playoff was contested between the New York Yankees, champions of the American League (AL) and defending American League champions, and the Los Angeles Dodgers, champions of the National League (NL). The Yankees defeated the Dodgers, four games to two, to win the franchise's 21st World Series championship, their first since 1962, and the first under the ownership of George Steinbrenner. The Series was played between October 11 and 18, broadcast on ABC.

During this Series, Reggie Jackson earned his nickname "Mr. October" for his heroics. Billy Martin won what would be his only World Series title as a manager after guiding the Yankees to a second straight pennant.

1978 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1978 season ended with the Los Angeles Dodgers winning their second straight National League pennant and losing to the New York Yankees in the World Series again. Dodger coach Jim Gilliam died at the end of the season and his uniform number, 19, was retired by the team prior to Game 1 of the World Series; the team also wore a black memorial patch with Gilliam's number during the World Series. Unlike the previous Dodger team, no member of the team hit 30 home runs after seeing four members hit that mark the previous season (the team leader was Reggie Smith, with 29).

1978 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1978 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 49th midseason exhibition between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was played on July 11, 1978, at San Diego Stadium in San Diego, home of the San Diego Padres of the National League. The game resulted in a 7-3 victory for the NL.

This was the first All-Star Game to be played in San Diego. It would return in 1992 to be played in the same stadium, though it was renamed Jack Murphy Stadium by that time.

The honorary captains were Brooks Robinson (for the AL) and Eddie Mathews (for the NL).

1978 National League Championship Series

The 1978 National League Championship Series was a best-of-five matchup for the second straight year between the West Division champion Los Angeles Dodgers and the East Division champion Philadelphia Phillies. The Dodgers beat the Phillies three games to one once again and lost the World Series to the New York Yankees, as they had the year before.

1978 World Series

The 1978 World Series matched the defending champions New York Yankees against the Los Angeles Dodgers in a rematch of the previous year's World Series, with the Yankees winning in six games, just like the previous year, to repeat as champions. As of 2018, it remains the most recent World Series to feature a rematch of the previous season's matchup.1978 was the first of ten consecutive years that saw ten different teams win the World Series. The Los Angeles Dodgers would break the string with a World Series win in 1988 (as they won in the 1981 World Series).

This Series had two memorable confrontations between Dodger rookie pitcher Bob Welch and the Yankees' Reggie Jackson. In Game 2, Welch struck Jackson out in the top of the ninth with two outs and the tying and go-ahead runs on base to end the game. Jackson would avenge the strikeout, when in Game 4 he singled off Welch which moved Roy White to second, from which White would score the game winning run on a Lou Piniella single to tie the series at 2-2. In Game 6, Jackson smashed a two-run homer off Welch in the seventh to increase the Yankees' lead to 7–2 and put a final "exclamation point" on the Yankees' victory to win the series.

1981 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1981 Los Angeles Dodgers season got off to a strong start when rookie pitcher Fernando Valenzuela pitched a shutout on opening day, starting the craze that came to be known as "Fernandomania." Fernando went on to win both the Rookie of the Year and Cy Young Awards.

The season was divided into two halves because of a players strike in mid-season. The Dodgers won the Western Division of the National League in the first half and advanced to the playoffs. They beat the Houston Astros in a divisional playoff and the Montreal Expos in the National League Championship Series before beating the New York Yankees to win the World Series.

1981 World Series

The 1981 World Series was the championship series of the 1981 MLB season. It matched the New York Yankees against the Los Angeles Dodgers, marking their third meeting in the Series in five years as well as a record eleventh Series meeting overall and last Series meeting to date. The Dodgers won the Series in six games in a mirror image of the two teams' last Series meeting in 1978, for their first title since 1965 and their first victory over the Yankees since 1963 and third World Series win over the Yankees, overall.

This is the last World Series that a team won after losing the first two games on the road. This also was the last meeting between teams from New York City and Los Angeles for a major professional sports championship until the Los Angeles Kings and New York Rangers reached the NHL's 2014 Stanley Cup Finals, and also the last meeting between the Dodgers and the Yankees in the World Series to date (the two teams have met 11 times in the World Series, making it the most frequent matchup in World Series history).

1982 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1982 Los Angeles Dodgers entered the season as the defending World Series champions. They would remain in contention until the final day of the regular season, when the San Francisco Giants would knock them out of the National League West division race, in a season that saw the Atlanta Braves reach the playoffs instead. The Dodgers finished second in the National League West at 88–74, becoming the fifth team since 1969 to miss the playoffs one year after winning the World Series. This was the final L.A. season for longtime cornerstones Steve Garvey and Ron Cey, who would move on to new teams next season. The Dodgers did welcome new second baseman Steve Sax, who won the Rookie of the Year Award.

1993 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1993 followed the system in place since 1978.

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and

elected Reggie Jackson.

The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions to consider older major league players as well as managers, umpires, executives, and figures from the Negro Leagues.

It selected no one.

List of Los Angeles Dodgers seasons

The Los Angeles Dodgers are the second most successful franchise in the National League and the third-most successful and second-most wealthy in Major League Baseball after the New York Yankees. The franchise was formerly based in Brooklyn and known originally as the "Grays" or "Trolley Dodgers" after the trams which supporters had to avoid to enter games. Later it became known successively as the "Bridegrooms", "Superbas", "Dodgers" and "Robins"; the present "Dodgers" was firmly established in 1932.

The franchise has won the World Series six times and lost a further 13, and like the Yankees and Cardinals have never lost 100 games in a season since World War I, with their worst record since then being in 1992 with 63 wins and their best records ever being in 1953 with 105 wins and both 1942 and 2017 with 104. Their most successful period, between 1947 and 1966 with ten World Series appearances and only two seasons with 71 or more losses (one of them the year they moved to Los Angeles after a dispute over stadium funding), was famous for the Dodgers becoming the first Major League Baseball team to incorporate African American players, led by Jackie Robinson and Roy Campanella.

Tri-City Atoms

The Tri-Cities in southeastern Washington, which include Kennewick, Richland, and Pasco, have fielded a number of minor league baseball teams in the Northwest League and its predecessor, the Western International League.

The Tri-City Braves were a member of the WIL from 1950 through 1954, then became a charter member of the new Northwest League in 1955. The Tri-Cities were continually represented through 1974 under various names (Braves 1955–60, 1962; Angels 1961, 1963–64; Atoms 1965–68; A's 1969; Padres 1970–72; Triplets 1973; Ports 1974).

In 1974, the Ports were an independent team and went 27–57 in front of 21,611 fans. The team was managed by owner Carl W. Thompson, Sr. before folding.

Notable players with the Atoms included Doyle Alexander, Ron Cey, Joe Ferguson, and Ted Sizemore, the National League's Rookie of the Year in 1969.

From 1950 through 1974, home games were held at Sanders-Jacobs Field in Kennewick, located at the northeast corner of Clearwater Avenue and Neel Street (46.213°N 119.169°W / 46.213; -119.169). The field was aligned to the northeast and named for Harry Sanders, a Connell farmer, and Tom Jacobs, a former manager and the general manager of the Atoms at the time of his death at age 64 in 1968. The ballpark was demolished in the mid-1970s, shortly after the Ports folded.

The Tri-Cities were without baseball until 1983, when the Tri-Cities Triplets (an homage to the 1973 name) formed, though they only lasted for four summers. The Triplets had relocated from Walla Walla and were an affiliate of the Texas Rangers for the first two years, independent for the final two. They played their home games at Richland High School baseball field, adjacent to the Bomber Bowl football stadium. The team was bought by the Brett brothers in February 1986, then sold that autumn to Diamond Sports, a group headed by the general manager, Mal Fichman. The Triplets relocated to Boise, Idaho prior to the 1987 season and became the Boise Hawks.The Tri-Cities was also home to the Tri-City Posse of the independent Western Baseball League from 1995 to 2000. The Posse were founded in the WBL's first year in 1995, won the league title in 1999, but were forced to fold with the arrival of the former Portland franchise of the NWL, after the 2000 season.

The current Tri-City Dust Devils of the Northwest League arrived in 2001, moving up the Columbia River after six seasons in Portland as the Rockies.

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