Roman Catholic Diocese of Münster

The Diocese of Münster is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in Germany.[1][2] It is a suffragan diocese of the Archdiocese of Cologne. Bishop Felix Genn is the current Bishop of the Diocese of Münster. He was ordained to the priesthood on July 11, 1976 and was appointed to the See of Münster on December 19, 2008.

Diocese of Münster

Dioecesis Monasteriensis

Bistum Münster (in German)
Bild Muenster St Paulus-Dom
Cathedral of St. Paul, Münster
Location
CountryGermany
Ecclesiastical provinceCologne
MetropolitanCologne
Statistics
Area15,268 km2 (5,895 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2014)
4,333,919
1,953,081 (45.1%)
Parishes304
Information
Established800
CathedralCathedral of St. Paul
Secular priests1,129
Current leadership
PopeFrancis
BishopFelix Genn
Metropolitan ArchbishopRainer Maria Woelki
Auxiliary Bishops
  • Dieter Geerlings
  • Christoph Hegge
  • Wilfried Theising
  • Stefan Zekorn
Emeritus Bishops
  • Heinrich Janssen
Map
Karte Bistum Münster
Website
bistum-muenster.de

Statistics

As of 31 Dec. 2006, with 4.336 million adherents or 47.1% of local population, nearly half the inhabitants of the Münster diocese were Roman Catholic; due to continuing securalisation, this a decreased percentage compared to earlier periods. Sunday mass attendance reflects this decline over the course of three decades. Per the diocesan website: in 2005, 13.6% Roman Catholics attended Sunday mass; in 2004, this was 14.5%. A decade earlier, in 1995, Sunday mass attendance was about 20% (416,406 churchgoers); in 1985, Sunday mass attendance was 29.3% (614,839 Roman Catholics); and, in 1975, Sunday mass attendance was 35.1% or 787,582 persons. Over a 30-year period, Sunday mass attendance declined over 50%.

As of 18 July 2013, there were 1,129 priests, 296 permanent deacons, and 2,540 religious in the diocese.[3]

History

The diocese was canonically erected in 800 by Pope Leo III. It lost territory on February 23, 1957 to the newly established Diocese of Essen.

Ordinaries

Bishops till 1181

  • Saint Ludger (805–809)
  • Gerfried (809–839)
  • Altfried (839–849)
  • Liutbert (849–870)
  • Bertold of Münster (870 – between 870 and 880)
  • Wolfhelm of Münster (from before 882 – 888/889)
  • Nidhard (899 – 921/922)
  • Rumhold (922–941)
  • Hildebold of Münster (941–969)
  • Dodo of Münster (969–993)
  • Swidger of Münster (993–1011)
  • Dietrich I of Münster (1011–1022)
  • Siegfried of Walbeck (1022–1032)
  • Hermann I of Münster(1032–1042)
  • Rudbert of Münster (1042–1063)
  • Frederick I of Münster (1064–1084)
  • Erpho (1085–1097)
  • Burchard of Holte (1098–1118)
  • Dietrich II of Münster (1118–1127)
  • Egbert of Münster (1127–1132)
  • Werner of Steußlingen (1132–1151)
  • Frederick II of Are (1152–1168)
  • Louis I of Wippra (1169–1173)
  • Hermann II of Katzenelnbogen (1174–1203)

Prince-Bishops

  • Hermann II of Katzenelnbogen (1174–1203)
  • Otto I of Oldenburg (1204–1218)
  • Dietrich III of Isenberg (1218–1226)
  • Ludolphus of Holte (1226–1247)
  • Otto of Lippe (1247–1259)
  • William I of Holte (1259–1260)
  • Gerard of the Marck (1261–1272)
  • Everhard of Diest (1275–1301)
  • Otto III of Rietberg (1301–1306)
  • Conrad I of Berg (1306–1310)
  • Louis II of Hesse (1310–1357)
  • Adolphus of the Marck (1357–1363)
  • John I of Virneburg (1363–1364)
  • Florence of Wevelinkhoven (1364–1378)
  • John II Potho of Pothenstein (1379–1382)
  • Heidenreich Wolf of Lüdinghausen (1382–1392)
  • Otto IV of Hoya (1392–1424)
  • Henry II of Moers † ( 1424 Appointed – 2 Jun 1450 Died)
  • Walram of Moers † (14 Jul 1450 Appointed – 3 Oct 1456 Died)
  • Eric I of Hoya (antibishop 1450–1457)
  • John of Palatinate-Simmern † (disputed; 11 Apr 1457 Appointed – 20 May 1465 Confirmed, Archbishop of Magdeburg)
  • Henry III of Schwarzburg † (Apr 1466 Appointed – 14 Dec 1496 Died)
  • Conrad IV of Rietberg † (18 Apr 1497 Appointed – 9 Feb 1508 Died)
  • Eric II of Saxe-Lauenburg † (24 Feb 1508 Appointed – 20 Oct 1522 Died)
  • Frederick III of Wied † (6 Nov 1522 Appointed – 24 Mar 1532 Resigned)
  • Eric III of Brunswick-Grubenhagen † (27 Mar 1532 Appointed – 14 May 1532 Died)
  • Francis I of Waldeck † (1 Jun 1532 Appointed – 15 Jul 1553 Died)
  • William II Ketteler † (21 Jul 1553 Appointed – 2 Dec 1557 Resigned)
  • Bernhard von Raesfeld † (4 Dec 1557 Appointed – 25 Oct 1566 Resigned)
  • John III of Hoya † (26 Oct 1566 Appointed – 5 Apr 1574 Died)
  • John William of Juliers-Cleves-Berg † (28 Apr 1574 Appointed – 18 May 1585 Resigned)
  • Ernest of Bavaria † (18 May 1585 Appointed – 17 Feb 1612 Died)
  • Ferdinand I of Bavaria † (18 Feb 1612 Confirmed – 13 Sep 1650 Died)
  • Bernard von Galen † (14 Nov 1650 Appointed – 19 Sep 1678 Died)
  • Ferdinand II of Fürstenberg † (19 Sep 1678 Succeeded – 26 Jun 1683 Died)
  • Maximilian Henry of Bavaria (1683–1688)
  • Friedrich Christian von Plettenberg zu Lenhausen † (29 Jul 1688 Appointed – 5 May 1706 Died)
  • Franz Arnold von Wolff-Metternich zur Gracht † (8 Jun 1707 Appointed – 25 Dec 1718 Died)
  • Clemens August I of Bavaria † (26 Mar 1719 Appointed – 6 Feb 1761 Died)
  • Maximilian Friedrich von Königsegg-Rothenfels † (16 Sep 1762 Appointed – 15 Apr 1784 Died)
  • Maximilian Francis of Austria † (15 Apr 1784 Succeeded – 29 Jul 1801 Died)

Bishops since 1820

  • Anton Victor of Austria elect (1801, resigned after rejection by Prussia)
  • Sede vacante (1801–1820)
  • Ferdinand Hermann Maria Freiherr von Lüninck † (28 Aug 1820 Appointed – 18 Mar 1825 Died)
  • Kaspar Maximilian Droste zu Vischering † (15 Jun 1825 Appointed – 3 Aug 1846 Died)
  • Bernard Georg Kellermann † (10 Dec 1846 Appointed – 29 Mar 1847 Died)
  • Johann Georg Müller † (1 Jul 1847 Appointed – 19 Jan 1870 Died)
  • Johannes Bernhard Brinkmann † (6 Apr 1870 Appointed – 13 Apr 1889 Died)
  • Hermann Jakob Dingelstad † (15 Aug 1889 Appointed – 6 Mar 1911 Died)
  • Felix von Hartmann † (6 Jun 1911 Appointed – 29 Oct 1912 Appointed, Archbishop of Cologne)
  • Johannes Poggenburg † (7 May 1913 Appointed – 5 Jan 1933 Died)
  • Bl. Clemens Augustus II von Galen † (5 Sep 1933 Appointed – 22 Mar 1946 Died)
  • Michael Keller † (19 Jul 1947 Appointed – 7 Nov 1961 Died)
  • Joseph Höffner † (9 Jul 1962 Appointed – 6 Jan 1969 Appointed, Coadjutor Archbishop of Köln {Cologne})
  • Heinrich Tenhumberg † (7 Jul 1969 Appointed – 16 Sep 1979 Died)
  • Reinhard Lettmann † (11 Jan 1980 Appointed – 28 Mar 2008 Retired)
  • Felix Genn (19 Dec 2008 Appointed – )

Auxiliary bishops

  • Dietrich Schenk, O.F.M. (14 Jan 1394)[4]
  • Johann Christiani von Schleppegrell, O.S.A. (7 Jun 1428 – 8 Oct 1468)[5]
  • Johannes Wennecker, O.S.A. (1454–1469)[6]
  • Weribold von Heys, O.F.M. (10 Dec 1470 – 1477)[7]
  • Johannes Ymminck, O.S.A. (1472–1484).[8]
  • Heinrich Schodehoet, O.S.A. (8 Jan 1494 – 1515)[9][10]
  • Johannes Meppen, O.S.A. (1495 – 15 Nov 1496)[11]
  • Johannes Pictor Meler, O.S.A. (15 Jan 1518 – 1529)
  • Bernhard von Sachsen-Lauenburg, O. Cist. (23 Mar 1519 – 1536)
  • Johannes Bischopinck (26 Jan 1537 – 1547)
  • Balthasar Fannemann (Waneman) (26 Aug 1540 – 8 Oct 1561)
  • Johannes Kridt (16 Mar 1550 – 16 Sep 1577)
  • Cunerus Petri (Jan 1580 – 15 Feb 1580)
  • Godfried von Mierlo, O.P. (14 Mar 1582 – 28 Jul 1587)
  • Nikolaus Arresdorf, O.F.M. Conv. (23 Nov 1592 – 28 Mar 1620)
  • Johannes Pelking (Pelcking), O.F.M. Conv. (16 Dec 1619 – 28 Dec 1642)
  • Johann Nikolaus Claessens (8 Aug 1622 – 1 Apr 1650)
  • Johann Sternenberg (de Dusseldorf) (7 Oct 1647 – 1652)
  • Bl. Niels Stensen (1680–1683)
  • Johann Peter von Quentell (14 Aug 1699 – 13 Apr 1710)
  • Wilhelm Hermann Ignaz Ferdinand von Wolf-Metternich zu Gracht (16 Sep 1720 – 28 Oct 1722)
  • Ferdinand Oesterhoff, O. Cist. (20 Dec 1723 – 20 Jan 1746)
  • Franz Bernardin Verbeck, O.F.M. Conv. (19 Sep 1746 – Dec 1756)
  • Wilhelm von Alhaus, O.S.C. (2 Oct 1758 – 26 May 1794)
  • Kaspar Max Droste zu Vischering (1 Jun 1795 – Münster 17 Dec 1825; Appointed Bishop of Münster)
  • Klemens August Droste zu Vischering (9 Apr 1827 – 1 Feb 1836)
  • Franz Arnold Melchers (21 Nov 1836 – 18 Feb 1851)
  • Georg Anton Brinkmann (15 Mar 1852 – 7 May 1856)
  • Johannes Boßmann (Bossmann) (25 Jun 1858 – 4 Aug 1875)
  • Franz Wilhelm Cramer (13 Nov 1884 – 15 Mar 1903)
  • Maximilian Gereon von Galen (16 Jul 1895 – 5 Nov 1908)
  • Everhard Illigens (28 Feb 1909 – 2 Jan 1914)
  • Theodor Kappenberg (27 Apr 1914 – 18 Sep 1920)
  • Johannes Scheifes (7 Mar 1921 – 30 Oct 1936)
  • Heinrich Roleff (7 Mar 1936 – 5 Nov 1966)
  • Heinrich Gleumes (5 Oct 1948 – 26 Aug 1951)
  • Heinrich Baaken (26 Jan 1952 – Mar 1976)
  • Heinrich Tenhumberg (28 May 1958 – 7 Jul 1969, Appointed Bishop of Münster)
  • Laurenz Böggering (25 Jul 1967 – 23 Feb 1979)
  • Reinhard Lettmann (18 Jan 1973 – 11 Jan 1980, Appointed Bishop of Münster)
  • Ludwig Averkamp (18 Jan 1973 – 7 Nov 1985)
  • Max Georg von Twickel (18 Jan 1973 – 6 Jul 2001)
  • Alfons Demming (6 Nov 1976 – 30 Apr 1998)
  • Hermann Josef Spital (15 Oct 1980 – 24 Feb 1981)
  • Josef Voß (Voss) (18 Mar 1988 – 16 Dec 2009)
  • Wilhelm Wöste (6 Nov 1976 – 20 Dec 1986)
  • Friedrich Ostermann (27 Jun 1981 – 18 Jul 2007)
  • Heinrich Janssen (4 Jul 1986 – 31 May 2010)
  • Werner Thissen (16 Apr 1999 – 22 Nov 2002)
  • Heinrich Timmerevers (6 Jul 2001 – 29 Apr 2016)
  • Franz-Peter Tebartz-van Elst (14 Nov 2003 – 28 Nov 2007)
  • Franz-Josef Overbeck (18 Jul 2007 – 28 Oct 2009)
  • Dieter Geerlings (31 May 2010 – )
  • Christoph Hegge (31 May 2010 – )
  • Wilfried Theising (31 May 2010 – )
  • Stefan Zekorn (3 Dec 2010 – )

See also

Footnotes

  1. ^ "Diocese of Münster Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  2. ^ "Diocese of Münster" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  3. ^ Vatican Information Service July 18, 2007
  4. ^ "Bishop Dietrich Schenk, O.F.M." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016
  5. ^ "Bishop Johann Christiani von Schleppegrell, O.S.A." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved June 12, 2016
  6. ^ "Bishop Johannes Wennecker, O.S.A." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016
  7. ^ "Bishop Weribold von Heys, O.F.M." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016
  8. ^ "Bishop Johannes Ymminck, O.S.A." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved July 29, 2016
  9. ^ "Bishop Heinrich Schodehoet, O.S.A." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved September 5, 2016
  10. ^ "Bishop Heinrich Schodehoet, O.E.S.A." GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved September 5, 2016
  11. ^ "Bishop Johannes Meppen, O.S.A." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016

External links

  • Website of the Diocese
  • Wikisource-logo.svg Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Münster" . Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.

Coordinates: 51°57′47″N 7°37′32″E / 51.96306°N 7.62556°E

Alfons Demming

Alfons Demming (February 29, 1928 – October 31, 2012) was the Roman Catholic titular bishop of Gordus and auxiliary bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Münster, Germany.

Ordained in 1953, Demming was named bishop in 1976 and resigned in 1998.

Bunde, Germany

Bunde is a municipal district in East Frisia, in Lower Saxony, Germany, about 20 km (12 mi.) south of Emden, Germany, and 50 km (30 mi.) east of Groningen, Netherlands. It lies on the southern tip of the Dollart, a bay of the North Sea between Germany and the Netherlands, and has a land border with the Netherlands.

Bunde is among the smaller districts of East Frisia, with a population of 7,607 (as of 2015). About half live in the town of Bunde itself. The district's population density is comparatively low, equating to 62 per square km (160 per sq. mi.), compared to 228/sq. km (591 sq. mi.) for Germany as a whole. In the 17th and 18th centuries, sizeable areas of the district were wrested from the sea by the creation of polders.

Bunde's economy centers on agriculture and tourism. The community has been officially recognized as a resort town since 1998. Many of the town's residents commute to jobs elsewhere, notably in Leer, about 13 km (8 mi.) to the east. Residents include a number of Dutch nationals, most of whom commute to jobs in the Netherlands.

The town's cultural artifacts include the Reformed Church (Reformierte Kreuzkirche), the nave of which dates from the 13th century, and the red brick Steinhaus Bunderhee castle, which dates from the 14th century.

Fortunato Santini

Fortunato Santini (Rome, 5 January 1778 – Rome, 14 September 1861) was an Italian priest, composer and music collector.

Friedrich Ostermann

Friedrich Ostermann (21 June 1932 – 22 October 2018) was an Auxiliary Bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Münster.

Ostermann was ordained on 11 February 1958. After an initial temporary appointment in Bockum-Hövel he became a Chaplain in Emsdetten, and then a parish priest in Rheine (Sacred Heart) in 1969 and in 1975 a Dean in the Office of the Rhine Deanery.

Pope John Paul II appointed him as Titular Bishop of Dolia and Auxiliary Bishop of Münster (Suffragan Bishop of Warendorf in the diocese of Münster). On 13 September 1981, Ostermann was ordained as a bishop by Bishop Dr. Reinhard Lettmann; co-consecrators were Hermann Josef Spital (Bishop of Trier), and Alfons Demming (Auxiliary Bishop of Münster). In 1981 Ostermann was appointed a Canon Residentiary of Münster Cathedral and Head of the Agency of Missions, Development and Freedom of the Bishops' General Vicarage at Münster. Since 2003 he has been the Dean of the Cathedral of St Paul in Münster.

From 2001 – 2006, Ostermann was the Chairman of the Journalism Commission of the German Bishops' Conference.

On his 75th birthday he tendered his resignation to Pope Benedict XVI on 21 June 2007 which was accepted on 18 July that year.

Marl, North Rhine-Westphalia

Marl is a town and a municipality in the district of Recklinghausen, in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It is situated near the Wesel-Datteln Canal, approx. 10 km north-west of Recklinghausen. It has about 90,000 people.

Michael Keller

Michael or Mike Keller may refer to:

Michael Keller (designer) (born 1963), German designer

Michael Keller (filmmaker), American filmmaker

Mike Keller (born 1949), American football player

Michael Keller (bishop) (1896–1961), bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Münster

Michael Keller (footballer), footballer for Zug 94

Michael Keller (chess composer) (born 1949), German International Grandmaster for chess compositions

Michael Keller, director of Long Now Foundation

Mike Keller, guitarist with Letters from the Fire

Münster Cathedral

Münster Cathedral or St.-Paulus-Dom is the cathedral church of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Münster in Germany, and is dedicated to St Paul. It is counted among the most significant church buildings in Münster and, along with the City Hall, is one of the symbols of the city.

The cathedral stands in the heart of the city, on a small hill called Horsteberg, which is encircled by the Roggenmarkt, Prinzipalmarkt and Rothenburg streets and by the Münstersche Aa river. This area, which also contains the Domplatz and surrounding buildings, was the old Domburg. Today the cathedral is the parish church for this area. West of the cathedral lies the bishop's palace and part of the old curia complex along with the current cathedral chapter.

The cathedral had two predecessors. The first cathedral (called the Ludgerus Dom, 805-1377) stood to the north of the current cathedral; the second cathedral was built in the tenth or eleventh century and was demolished during the construction of the third and current cathedral between 1225 and 1264. The imposing westwerk with its nearly identical towers was built as part of the second cathedral around 1192 and was incorporated into the current building. As a result, the cathedral is a mixture of styles, combining the Romanesque westwerk, old choir and west towers with the Gothic nave, transepts, high choir and ring of chapels.

Each of the cathedral buildings served as the cathedral church of the Diocese of Munster, but each also had additional functions, at least at times. The original Carolingian cathedral was also the Collegiate church for a cloister founded by Liudger, with the monks living under the rule of Chrodegang. Each cathedral served as a parish church, originally for the whole of Munster. As a result of the foundation of further parish churches, the parish district of the cathedral was reduced to the Old Domburg and Domimmunität in 1090. In the first half of the thirteenth century, the Church of St Jacobi was built on the Domplatz. With the completion of this church, the cathedral, which was then under construction, lost its function as a parish church entirely. Since the demolition of St Jacobi in 1812, the cathedral regained its role as parish church for the Old Domburg and Domimmunität.

The cathedral contains the tomb of the former Bishop of Munster, Clemens August Graf von Galen who became a Cardinal shortly before his death in 1946 and was beatified by Pope Benedict XVI in 2005.

Oldenburg Land

Oldenburg Land (German: Oldenburger Land) is a region and regional association in the German state of Lower Saxony in the area of the former Grand Duchy of Oldenburg (1815-1918), the later Free State of Oldenburg (1918-1946) and administrative district of Oldenburg (1946 to 1978), without its exclaves, along the rivers Hunte and Hase. In the region between Waterkant, Dümmer and Damme Hills some of the population still speak Low German today and, in Saterland also Saterland Frisian. The region is rich in old Lower Saxon customs such as Schützenfests or Kohlfahrten. Typical country sports include Klootschießen and Boßeln.

The mainly Catholic southern part of the Oldenburg Land is known as Oldenburg Münsterland, the mainly Lutheran northern part is known as Oldenburg Land (Old Oldenburg) in its narrower sense.

In terms of Germany's modern administrative districts, Oldenburg Land roughly corresponds to Ammerland, Cloppenburg, Delmenhorst, Friesland, Oldenburg (rural), Oldenburg (urban), Vechta, Wesermarsch, and Wilhelmshaven. These 9 districts have a combined population of about 1.1 million (per the end of 2016) and an area of about 5,700 km2 (2,200 mi2).

The borders of the Oldenburg Land are still clear today from the boundaries of institutions such the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Oldenburg, the Offizialatsbezirk Vechta of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Münster and the Landessparkasse zu Oldenburg.

St. Peter Church (Cleveland, Ohio)

St. Peter Church (German: Kirche St. Peter), is a Catholic parish church in Cleveland, Ohio and part of the Diocese of Cleveland. Founded in 1853, it is located at the intersection of Superior Ave. near East 17th St., in the Downtown neighborhood.

The church is a GNIS named feature. The church building is listed as a Cleveland Designated Landmark. George Francis Houck, then the Chancellor, wrote in 1903 that, "One of the landmarks of the city and Diocese of Cleveland is St. Peter's Church."

Timeline of Münster

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Münster, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany.

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