Roger Wehrli

Roger Russell Wehrli (born November 26, 1947) is a former National Football League cornerback who played his entire 14-year career with the St. Louis Cardinals from 1969 until 1982. He was a seven-time Pro Bowler after playing college football at the University of Missouri, where he was a consensus All-American and a first-round draft choice by the Cardinals in 1969. He was inducted to the College Football Hall of Fame in 2003 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2007.

Roger Wehrli
Roger Wehrli
No. 22
Position:Cornerback
Personal information
Born:November 26, 1947 (age 71)
New Point, Missouri
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:190 lb (86 kg)
Career information
High school:King City (MO)
College:Missouri
NFL Draft:1969 / Round: 1 / Pick: 19
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Interceptions:40
Fumbles recovered:22
Defensive touchdowns:2
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

High school

Wehrli was born in New Point, Missouri. His parents were teachers and his father was a school district superintendent. They enrolled Roger in school at the age of 5. As a result, he started his freshman year of high school at the age of 13. In 1965, Dan Devine recruited Wehrli from King City, Missouri, where he lettered in football, basketball, and track for the Wildkats, as well as help the school win the state title in track in 1965.

College career

Wehrli was assigned to defense by University of Missouri coach Dan Devine. Despite playing on defense, Wehrli was able to get his hands on the ball often enough to be an offensive threat. Wehrli was a two-time All-Big 8 player and was the Big 8 Defensive Player of the Year as a senior. That same year, he was a unanimous All-America selection.

Roger had ten career interceptions, with seven coming in his senior season, also returning kickoffs and punts. In 1968, his 40 punt returns and 12-yard return average led the nation. To finish off an 8-3 season, Wehrli had a decisive interception to help lead the Missouri to a 35-10 victory over the University of Alabama in the Gator Bowl.

At the time of his College Hall of Fame induction he held school records for career punt returns, punt return yards in a game, season, and career. He played in the Senior Bowl and was named to the 50-year Anniversary All-Senior Bowl team.

Wehrli was a member of the first class of inductees into the Missouri Sports Hall of Fame, located in Springfield.

He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 2003. Wehrli is the 13th person with ties to the University of Missouri to be inducted into the College Hall of Fame. In 1990, Wehrli was voted a charter member of the University of Missouri Intercollegiate Athletics Hall of Fame.

NFL career

"The term ‘Shutdown Corner’ originated with Roger Wehrli. There wasn’t a better cornerback I played against. He was a great, great defensive back. You had to be aware of him all the time.”
Roger Staubach

Wehrli's outstanding attribute was his speed. Originally expected to be taken in the third round, he ran a 4.5 40-yard dash and vaulted into the first round.[1] Hall of Fame quarterback Roger Staubach has called Wehrli the best cornerback he played against, and claims that the term "shutdown corner" originated as a description of Wehrli.[2]

In his career, Wehrli had 40 career interceptions for 309 yards and recovered 19 fumbles. He was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2007. When inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, he became the second Missouri player to be elected, joining former tight end Kellen Winslow, who was enshrined in 1995. Wehrli was inducted into the Cardinals Ring of Honor on October 14, 2007.

An All-Rookie choice in 1969, Wehrli was voted All-Pro in 1970 and was a consensus All-NFC selection including being voted to the Pro Bowl. In 1971, Wehrli was 2nd team All-Pro by the NEA and again was a consensus All-NFC choice and was selected to his second Pro Bowl. In 1972 Wehrli was moved to safety by the Cardinals coaching staff where he played alongside Hall of Famer Larry Wilson. He returned to right cornerback in 1973.

In 1974 Wehrli was again All-Pro and he made his third Pro Bowl and was a consensus All-NFC selection. The following year, 1975 though 1977, he was a consensus All-pro and consensus All-NFC player and a Pro Bowler. In 1978 Wehrli's only post-season honor was being honorable mention All-NFC by UPI as his Cardinal team struggled under new coach Bud Wilkinson. In 1979 Wehrli had a fine season and was a consensus All-NFC pick and made his seventh Pro Bowl. In 1981, after 12 seasons as right cornerback (except for 1972), Wehrli switched to the left side. In his first start at the other corner, he broke up two passes and made four tackles as the Cards shut out the Buffalo Bills, 24–0.

In his 14 seasons, Wehrli played in 193 games. In addition to his starting defensive back duties, he was the holder on the place-kicks. In that role he scored a touchdown in 1982 on a fake field goal.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Cardinals All-Time Team: Cornerbacks – Roger Wehrli - '69-'82". Revenge of the Birds blog. SBNation. August 1, 2009. Retrieved 2016-06-17.
  2. ^ Miklasz, Bernie (2007-02-04). "Hall of Fame for Wehrli? Roger that". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Archived from the original on 2007-02-07. Retrieved 2013-12-01.

External links

1967 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1967 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1967 college football season. The selectors for the 1967 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1968 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1968 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1968 college football season. The selectors for the 1968 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1969 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1969 St. Louis Cardinals season was the 50th season the team was in the National Football League (NFL).

The team failed to improve on their previous output of 9–4–1, winning only four games. They failed to qualify for the playoffs for the 21st consecutive season.

The Cardinals’ defense allowed 38 passing touchdowns, the second-highest total in pro football history.

1970 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1970 St. Louis Cardinals season was the 51st season the team was in the league. The team improved on their previous output of 4–9–1, winning eight games. Despite them shutting out three consecutive opponents (and holding a fourth, the defending Super Bowl champion Kansas City Chiefs, without a touchdown in a 6–6 draw), they failed to reach the playoffs for the 22nd straight season, thanks to three consecutive losses in December.

Prior to the season-ending skid, the Cardinals swept the Dallas Cowboys, with the second victory a 38–0 destruction on Monday Night Football at the Cotton Bowl. Dallas did not lose again until it fell to the Baltimore Colts in Super Bowl V.

1971 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1971. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1971.

1971 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1971 St. Louis Cardinals season was the 52nd season the team was in the National Football League and twelfth in St. Louis. The team failed to improve on their previous year's 8–5–1 record, winning only four games. They failed to reach the playoffs for the 23rd straight season, their previous appearance was in 1948 in the championship game.

This was the last season the team was co-owned by Charles Bidwill, Jr.; he sold his share to his younger brother Bill in September 1972. The adopted sons of Charles and Violet Bidwill, the two had co-owned the team since their mother's death in January 1962.

1974 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1974. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1974.

1974 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1974 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 55th year with the National Football League and the 15th season in St. Louis. The Cardinals scored 285 points while the defense gave up 218 points, en route to the NFC East Championship.The 10–4 Cardinals qualified for the postseason for the first time since 1948 when the franchise was based in Chicago. It was the Cardinals first winning season since 1970 when the Cardinals went 8–5–1. Although the Cardinals and the Washington Redskins finished with identical 10–4 records, the Cardinals won the NFC East title, because of their two victories over Washington that season.

The Cardinals won their first seven games, and were at least tied for first place from Week One to the end of the regular season.

1975 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1975. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1975.

1975 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1975 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 56th year with the National Football League and the 16th season in St. Louis. The club scored 356 points while the defense gave up 276 points. The club appeared in the playoffs for the second consecutive year, by winning the NFC East with a record of eleven wins and three losses. They were not again to appear in the playoffs during a full NFL season until 1998, by which time they had left St. Louis.

The team was nicknamed the “Cardiac Cards”, because eight of their games were decided in the final minute of play; the Cardinals went 7–1 in these games.

1976 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1976 St. Louis Cardinals season was the 57th season the franchise was in the league. The team failed to improve on their previous output of 11–3, instead regressing by one win. This was the first time in three seasons the team did not qualify for the playoffs.

1977 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1977. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1977.

1977 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1977 St. Louis Cardinals season was the franchise’s 56th year with the National Football League and the 17th season in St. Louis. This was the final season in St Louis for head coach Don Coryell who began coaching the San Diego Chargers the following year.

1979 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1979 St. Louis Cardinals season was the franchise’s 60th year with the National Football League and the 20th season in St. Louis. Bud Wilkinson would be fired in week 13 after starting 3–10, Larry Wilson would take over as interim head coach and lead the Cardinals to a 2–1 record to finish the season. Wilson would not return for the 1980 season but would return as Vice President and General Manager nine years later when the Cardinals had moved to Phoenix.

1980 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1980 St. Louis Cardinals season was the 61st season the team was in the league. The team matched their previous output of 5–11. The team failed to reach the playoffs for the fifth consecutive season.

1981 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1981 St. Louis Cardinals season was the 62nd season the franchise was in the league. The team improved on their previous output of 5–11, winning seven games. Despite the improvement the team failed – for the sixth consecutive season – to reach the playoffs.

Missouri Tigers football

The Missouri Tigers football program represents the University of Missouri (often referred to as Mizzou) in college football and competes in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Since 2012, Missouri has been a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC) and is currently aligned in its Eastern Division. Home games are played at Faurot Field ("The Zou") in Columbia, Missouri.

Missouri's football program dates back to 1890, and has appeared in 33 bowl games (including 10 major bowl appearances: 4 Orange Bowls, 3 Cotton Bowls, 2 Sugar Bowls, and 1 Fiesta Bowl). Missouri has won 15 conference titles, 5 division titles, and has 2 national championship selections recognized by the NCAA. Entering the 2017 season, Missouri's all-time record is 671–556–52 (.545).

The team was coached by Gary Pinkel (2001–2015), who is the winningest coach of all-time at Missouri (setting that mark with his 102nd win at the AT&T Cotton Bowl on January 3, 2014). Pinkel's record with Mizzou after his final game on November 27, 2015, is 118–73 (.618).

New Point, Missouri

New Point is an unincorporated community in eastern Holt County, Missouri, United States. It is located approximately five miles northeast of Oregon and was originally named Grant. Its post office has closed and mail now comes from Oregon. New Point's most famous citizen is football Hall of Famer Roger Wehrli, born in 1947.

Senior Bowl

The Senior Bowl is a post-season college football all-star game played each January in Mobile, Alabama, which showcases the best NFL Draft prospects of those players who have completed their college eligibility. First played in 1950 in Jacksonville, Florida, the game moved to Mobile's Ladd–Peebles Stadium the next year. Produced by the non-profit Mobile Arts & Sports Association, the game is also a charitable fund-raiser benefiting various local and regional organizations with over US$5.9 million in donations over its history.

In 2007, telecast of the game moved from ESPN to NFL Network. In 2013, Reese's took over sponsorship, starting with the 2014 game. In January 2018, Reese's announced that they were extending their sponsorship of the game; a specific duration was not given.

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