Roberto Alomar

Roberto "Robbie" Alomar Velázquez (/ˈæləmɑːr/; Spanish pronunciation: [aloˈmaɾ]; born February 5, 1968)[1] is a Puerto Rican former Major League Baseball (MLB) player who played for the San Diego Padres, Toronto Blue Jays, Baltimore Orioles, Cleveland Indians, New York Mets, Chicago White Sox, and Arizona Diamondbacks (1988–2004). He is regarded as one of the greatest second basemen and all-around players of all time.[2][3] During his career, the 12-time All-Star won more Gold Glove Awards for his defense (10) than any other second baseman in baseball history, in addition to winning four Silver Slugger Awards for his hitting.[4] Among second basemen, he ranks third in games played (2,320), fifth in stolen bases (474), sixth in plate appearances (10,400), seventh in doubles (504) and assists (6,524), and eighth in hits (2,724), runs (1,508), at bats (9,073), and double plays turned (1,407). In 2011, Alomar was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame, becoming the first Hall of Fame member to be depicted as a Blue Jays player on his plaque.[5]

The son of MLB second baseman Sandy Alomar Sr., Alomar followed in his father's footsteps, signing with the Padres as an amateur free agent in 1985. He made his major league debut with the team three years later, establishing himself as an exceptional base-stealing, hitting, and fielding threat before becoming an All-Star in 1990. He was traded to the Blue Jays the following off-season, leading the team to three consecutive American League Championship Series (ALCS) appearances and being named the 1992 ALCS Most Valuable Player (MVP), culminating in back-to-back World Series championships in 1992 and 1993. Alomar signed with the Orioles after the 1995 season, led the team to two ALCS appearances, and won the 1998 All-Star Game MVP Award in his final year with the team. He then joined the Indians for three seasons and had the most productive years of his career in 1999 and 2001, again leading his team to the playoffs and becoming an AL MVP Award finalist both years. Alomar spent the final years of his career with the Mets, White Sox, and Diamondbacks before retiring at spring training in 2005.

A switch hitter, Alomar finished his career with a .300 batting average; he is the Blue Jays' franchise record holder for career batting average. Shortly after his 2011 Hall of Fame induction, the Blue Jays retired his number 12. He currently serves as a special advisor to the Blue Jays organization.[6]

Roberto Alomar
Roberto Alomar 2011
Alomar at the 2011 Hall of Fame Induction Parade
Second baseman
Born: February 5, 1968 (age 51)
Ponce, Puerto Rico
Batted: Switch Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 22, 1988, for the San Diego Padres
Last MLB appearance
September 5, 2004, for the Chicago White Sox
MLB statistics
Batting average.300
Hits2,724
Home runs210
Runs batted in1,134
Stolen bases474
Teams
Career highlights and awards
Member of the National
Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Baseball Hall of Fame Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg
Induction2011
Vote90.0% (second ballot)

Early life

Alomar was born in Ponce, Puerto Rico and raised in Salinas, Puerto Rico.[7] The son of Santos "Sandy" Alomar Sr. and María Velázquez, Alomar grew up in a baseball family.[1][8] He and his older brother Sandy Jr. were raised mostly by their mother, due to their father's major league career.[9] When school in Puerto Rico was out for the summer, they joined their father, who let his sons hang around the clubhouse, shag fly balls, and absorb the game—especially from his New York Yankees teammates, such as Thurman Munson and Graig Nettles.[10] Growing up, Alomar idolized his father and José Cruz, both of whom were second basemen.[10][11]

Career

San Diego Padres

In 1985, Alomar signed with the San Diego Padres at age 17, and joined the team's Class-A affiliate, the Charleston Rainbows.[8] The following year, playing for the Reno Padres, he won the California League batting title with a .346 average.[8]

Alomar made his major league debut on April 22, 1988 against the Houston Astros, recording a hit in his first at bat, off of Nolan Ryan.[12] With the Padres, he established himself as a solid hitter and baserunner, and defensively, he displayed excellent lateral range and a powerful arm, often making spectacular plays on ground balls hit deep in the hole between first and second base, and on balls hit up the middle, well behind second base. He became an All-Star for the first time in 1990, as a reserve player for the National League.[8]

Toronto Blue Jays

JaysRetired12
Roberto Alomar is a member of the Toronto Blue Jays' Level of Excellence.

On December 5, 1990, Alomar and Joe Carter were traded to the Toronto Blue Jays in exchange for Fred McGriff and Tony Fernández.[13][14] It was in Toronto that he developed into a premier offensive second baseman, combining a .300-plus batting average with above average power and high end speed on the bases. In 1993, Alomar had his best season with the Jays, producing 17 home runs, 93 RBI and 55 stolen bases, while batting .326, third in the league behind teammates John Olerud and Paul Molitor. He was a central figure in Toronto's World Series championships in 1992 and 1993; in Game 6 of the 1992 World Series, he scored the series-winning run on Dave Winfield's two-run double in the 11th inning. Alomar's game-tying, ninth-inning home run against Oakland relief ace Dennis Eckersley, in Game 4 of the 1992 American League Championship Series, is considered by many as the most important hit in the club's history,[15] as the team's three previous trips to the ALCS had ended in disappointment; he was named the Most Valuable Player of the series.[8] In each of his five seasons with the Blue Jays, Alomar was on the All-Star team and won the Gold Glove Award. His .307 career batting average as a Blue Jay is a franchise record, and he was the Blue Jays Player of the Year in 1991, 1992 and 1995.

On March 20, 2008, the Toronto Blue Jays announced that Alomar would be elevated to the Level of Excellence at Toronto's Rogers Centre, joining such Blue Jay legends as George Bell, Joe Carter, Tony Fernández and Cito Gaston. On April 4, 2008, Alomar's name and number were added to the Level of Excellence, along with team executive Paul Beeston, prior to the 2008 home opener. Alomar and Beeston were presented commissioned portraits at the ceremony.

On July 19, 2011, the Toronto Blue Jays announced that they would retire Alomar's number 12 soon after his official induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Roberto Alomar is the first player in Blue Jays franchise history to have this honor, which took place on July 31, 2011.[16] Alomar is the first player to be inducted into the Hall of Fame depicted as a member of the Toronto Blue Jays.

Baltimore Orioles

Roberto Alomar and Ozzie Guillen
Alomar (left) with Ozzie Guillén during spring training, 1998

In 1995, Alomar signed with the Baltimore Orioles at a time when Toronto was looking to rebuild, while Baltimore was improving into a pennant-contending team. In Baltimore, Alomar paired with Hall of Famer Cal Ripken, Jr. to form a formidable double-play combination. Alomar appeared in the playoffs in 1996 and 1997 for the Orioles, although the Orioles were defeated in the ALCS in both years.

Spitting incident

On September 27, 1996, during a game against the Blue Jays, Alomar got into a heated argument over a called third strike with umpire John Hirschbeck and spat in his face. He defended himself by saying Hirschbeck had uttered a racial slur and that Hirschbeck had been bitter since one son had died of ALD and another had been recently diagnosed as well. Upon hearing this public disclosure of his private life, Hirschbeck had to be physically restrained from confronting Alomar in the players' locker room.[17]

Alomar was suspended for the first five regular season games in 1997 and donated $50,000 to ALD research. Alomar and Hirschbeck settled their differences publicly and made apologies to each other on April 22, 1997, standing at home plate and shaking hands in front of the crowd before an Orioles game.

Cleveland Indians

On November 24, 1998, Alomar signed a 4-year contract with the Cleveland Indians,[14] joining his brother, Sandy Jr. It was in Cleveland that Alomar had two of his finest seasons. In 1999 he hit .323/.422/.533 with 24 HRs, 120 RBI and 37 stolen bases, and in 2001 he batted .336/.415/.541 with 20 HRs, 100 RBI and 30 steals. Cleveland made the playoffs in 1999, losing in the ALDS to the Red Sox; in 2001 they again made the playoffs but lost to Seattle in the ALDS. Alomar finished third in MVP voting in 1999.

On the field, Alomar teamed with shortstop Omar Vizquel to form another decorated middle infield combination. In 2000, with Vizquel committing just three errors all season long, the entire Cleveland infield committed 34 errors—just one more than the record low set by the New York Mets infield the year before. Vizquel, Alomar and third baseman Travis Fryman each won the Gold Glove Award that season; the Vizquel-Alomar duo ultimately won three consecutive Gold Gloves together, becoming one of just eight shortstop-second baseman duos to have accomplished this feat in the same year.

Alomar was traded to the New York Mets before the 2002 season for pitcher Billy Traber and outfielders Matt Lawton and Alex Escobar.

Last years

In 2002, Alomar hit only .266/.331/.376 with 53 RBI and 73 runs scored, while falling apart defensively at second base. The Mets were puzzled by Alomar's mediocre play, which some attributed to his lack of comfort with being under the greater scrutiny of the New York fans and media. However, not even a midseason trade back to the American League to the Chicago White Sox in 2003 could revive Alomar from his funk. There was more misery ahead with the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2004, including a two-month disabled stint with a broken right hand. On August 5, Alomar returned to the White Sox, and hit just .263/.321/.392 in 56 games.

Alomar agreed to a one-year contract with the Tampa Bay Devil Rays for the 2005 season. However, on March 19, 2005, after a spring plagued by back and vision trouble, he decided to retire.

In a 17-year career, Alomar was a .300/.371/.443 hitter, with 210 home runs and 1,134 RBI in 2,379 games. At the time of his retirement, he was 51st all-time with 2,724 career hits. Defensively, Alomar posted a .984 fielding percentage at second base. He led the American League in fielding percentage four times (1992, 1995, 1999, and 2001).

Hall of Fame induction

BlueJays 12 retired
Roberto Alomar's number 12 was retired by the Toronto Blue Jays in 2011.
Roberto Alomar Hall of Fame Presentation Toronto
A ceremony in Toronto on July 31, 2011 honouring Alomar for his induction into the Hall of Fame

2010 was Alomar's first year of Hall of Fame eligibility, but he missed induction by eight votes. His 73.7% of the vote was the highest percentage of votes in any player's first year on the ballot without being elected. Some baseball writers expressed shock that Alomar failed to get in on the first ballot,[18] but many attributed the near-miss to sportswriters holding a grudge over the 1996 spitting incident with John Hirschbeck, including Alomar's brother Sandy and Hirschbeck himself.[19] Alomar was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in his second year of eligibility with 90% of the vote (523 of 581 ballots cast).[20] He is the third Puerto Rican in the Hall of Fame, after Roberto Clemente and Orlando Cepeda. On July 24, 2011, Alomar was formally inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York as a member of the Toronto Blue Jays.

On June 19, 2010, Alomar was inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame in St. Marys, Ontario.[21]

The 2011 Caribbean Series was dedicated to him, which was followed by his induction into the Caribbean Baseball Hall of Fame.[22]

Despite his number already being placed on the Blue Jays Level of Excellence, on July 31, 2011, the Toronto Blue Jays officially retired Alomar's #12 as the first retired number in franchise history.

On September 24, 2015, Alomar was inducted into the Ontario Sports Hall of Fame in Toronto.[23]

Personal life

Alomar married Puerto Rican model Maripily Rivera on June 1, 2009. The next year, Rivera alleged that she had been victim of aggression from Alomar and that she wanted to end the marriage. Alomar alleged that Rivera had threatened to divorce him unless he gave her half ownership of his Tampa residence.[24] The divorce was finalized on July 12, 2011 with a private settlement.[25][26]

On December 12, 2012, Alomar married Toronto native Kim Perks at the Art Gallery of Ontario.[27] Their first daughter was born in 2014.[28] Alomar resides in Toronto.[29]

Career milestones

Alomar Golden Glove award
Alomar's Gold Glove award.

Alomar established several milestones for a second baseman, including 12 straight All-Star appearances (1990–2001), and a record 10 Gold Gloves at the position (1991–96, 1998–2001). He also:

  • batted over .300 nine times (1992–97, 1999–2001)
  • posted an on-base percentage over .400 five times (1992–93, 1996, 1999, 2001)
  • scored 100 or more runs six times (1992–93, 1996, 1999–2001)
  • drove in 100 or more runs twice (1999, 2001)
  • stole 30 or more bases eight times (1989, 1991–93, 1995, 1999–2001)
  • won four Silver Slugger awards (1992, 1996, 1999–2000)
  • was inducted into the Hall of Fame[30]

Awards

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Porter, David L. (2004). Latino and African American athletes today: a biographical dictionary. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 20. ISBN 978-0-313-32048-4. Retrieved April 13, 2010.
  2. ^ "12-time All-Star retires; has back, vision problems". ESPN. ESPN Internet Ventures. Associated Press. March 19, 2005. Archived from the original on May 23, 2009. Retrieved May 23, 2009.
  3. ^ Namee, Matthew (June 28, 2004). "Roberto Alomar: A Forgotten Legend?". The Hardball Times. Archived from the original on May 23, 2009. Retrieved May 23, 2009.
  4. ^ "Silver Slugger Award Winners – National League". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on May 23, 2009. Retrieved May 23, 2009.
  5. ^ Kepner, Tyler (January 5, 2011). "Roberto Alomar and Bert Blyleven Elected to Hall of Fame". The New York Times.
  6. ^ Blue Jays to retire Alomar's jersey Archived July 21, 2011, at Archive-It Retrieved 12-07-2012
  7. ^ Van Hyning, Thomas E.; Eduardo Valero (2004). Puerto Rico's Winter League: A History of Major League Baseball's Launching Pad. McFarland. p. 111. ISBN 978-0-7864-1970-8. Retrieved April 13, 2010.
  8. ^ a b c d e Britton, John A (2002) [1992]. Dawson, Dawn P (ed.). Great Athletes. 1 (Revised ed.). Salem Press. pp. 49–51. ISBN 1-58765-008-8.
  9. ^ "Roberto Alomar Biography". www.bookrags.com.
  10. ^ a b Lubinger, Bill (July 19, 2011). "Roberto Alomar's long route to Cooperstown glory ran through Cleveland". Cleveland.com. Retrieved August 5, 2013.
  11. ^ Kepner, Tyler (January 4, 2010). "Roberto Alomar Awaits the Hall's Call". The New York Times. Retrieved August 5, 2013.
  12. ^ Houston Astros at San Diego Padres Box Score, April 22, 1988 Baseball-Reference.com. Accessed on April 29, 2019.
  13. ^ Wolpin, Stewart; Robinson, James G. "Roberto Alomar". BaseballLibrary.com. Idea Logical Company. Archived from the original on May 23, 2009. Retrieved May 23, 2009.
  14. ^ a b "Roberto Alomar from the Chronology". BaseballLibrary.com. Idea Logical Company. Archived from the original on May 23, 2009. Retrieved May 23, 2009.
  15. ^ a b Gillick, Alomar fittingly enter Hall together MLB.com. Accessed on February 24, 2012.
  16. ^ "Blue Jays to retire Alomar's No. 12". The Toronto Star. Archived from the original on April 26, 2016. Retrieved July 20, 2011.
  17. ^ Wulf, Steve (June 24, 2001). "The Spit Hits The Fan". Time Magazine. Retrieved July 9, 2009.
  18. ^ Rosenthal, Ken (January 7, 2010). "Snub of Alomar exposes flaw in voting". Fox Sports. Retrieved August 24, 2018.
  19. ^ "Eight votes shy, Alomar 'disappointed'". Major League Baseball.
  20. ^ "News - 2010 BBWAA Election Results". community.baseballhall.org.
  21. ^ nurun.com. "Alomar, Quantrill inducted in Hall of Fame". The London Free Press.
  22. ^ Ribas, Fernando (January 26, 2011). "Dedican Serie del Caribe a Roberto Alomar". El Nuevo Dia (in Spanish). El Nuevo Dia. Retrieved January 26, 2011.
  23. ^ "Roberto Alomar".
  24. ^ Fish, Mike (December 1, 2012). "Drama follows retired baseball All-Star". ESPN.
  25. ^ Vargas, Patricia (July 12, 2011). "Maripily divorciada y millonaria". El Nuevo Día.
  26. ^ Gómez, María Gabriela (July 12, 2011). "Maripily ya esta divorciada". Primera Hora.
  27. ^ Elliott, Bob (December 12, 2012). "Hall of Famer Roberto Alomar marries in Toronto on 12-12-12". Toronto Sun.
  28. ^ "Se convierte en padre Roberto Alomar". El Nuevo Día. April 11, 2014. Retrieved April 12, 2014.
  29. ^ Roberto Alomar impressed by Jose Reyes SLAM! Sports. Accessed on June 20, 2013.
  30. ^ Torres, Adry (July 24, 2011). "Roberto Alomar Enters Hall of Fame".

External links

1991 Toronto Blue Jays season

The 1991 Toronto Blue Jays season was the franchise's 15th season of Major League Baseball. It resulted in the Blue Jays finishing first in the American League East with a record of 91 wins and 71 losses. The team's paid attendance of 4,001,527 led the major leagues, as the Jays became the first team in MLB history to draw four million fans in a season. Toronto lost the ALCS to the eventual world champion Minnesota Twins in five games.

1992 American League Championship Series

The 1992 American League Championship Series was played between the Toronto Blue Jays and the Oakland Athletics from October 7 to 14, 1992. The Blue Jays won the series four games to two to advance to the World Series. The series was a rematch of the 1989 ALCS, which Oakland won in five games.

Blue Jays second baseman Roberto Alomar was named Most Valuable Player of the series. In six games, Alomar rapped 11 hits in 26 at bats for a .423 batting average, including a double and two home runs.

1992 Toronto Blue Jays season

The 1992 Toronto Blue Jays season was the franchise's 16th season of Major League Baseball. Toronto finished first in the American League East for the fourth time with a record of 96 wins and 66 losses, closing the season with an attendance record of 4,028,318. Toronto was not swept in a single series all year, becoming the first team in 49 years to accomplish the feat.In the American League Championship Series, the Blue Jays defeated the Oakland Athletics in six games for their first American League pennant in four tries. In the World Series, Toronto faced the Atlanta Braves, who had won their second straight National League pennant, but lost the previous year's World Series. The Blue Jays prevailed in six games, becoming the first non-U.S.-based team to win a World Series.

1993 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1993 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 64th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 13, 1993, at Oriole Park at Camden Yards in Baltimore, Maryland, the home of the Baltimore Orioles of the American League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 9-3.

This is also the last Major League Baseball All-Star Game to date to be televised by CBS.

1994 Toronto Blue Jays season

The 1994 Toronto Blue Jays season was the franchise's 18th season of Major League Baseball. It resulted in the Blue Jays finishing third in the American League East with a record of 55 wins and 60 losses. Cito Gaston was the manager for the American League squad at the All-Star Game. The Mid-Summer classic was played on July 12 at Three Rivers Stadium in Pittsburgh. Roberto Alomar and Joe Carter were starters at the event, while Pat Hentgen and Paul Molitor were named as reserves.

The season was cut short by the infamous 1994 player's strike, technically leaving the Blue Jays as the reigning World Champions.

1995 Caribbean Series

The thirty-seventh edition of the Caribbean Series (Serie del Caribe) was held from February 3 through February 8 of 1995 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The series featured four teams from Dominican Republic, Mexico, Puerto Rico and Venezuela. The hometown team, the Senadores de San Juan of the Puerto Rican League won the series. The team was managed by Luis Meléndez. The Most Valuable Player was Roberto Alomar, a second baseman with the Senadores de San Juan.

While the San Juan club had faced difficulty in emerging as the champions of the Puerto Rican Winter League, the team swept its way through the six-game Series by a 49-15 score. The Azucareros del Este of the Dominican League lost one game 16-0 by Puerto Rico. However they won all of their games against the other teams thanks to the arms of José Rijo, Pedro Martínez and Pedro Astacio to place second with a 4-2 record.

Puerto Rico was helped by having many major leaguers who normally would have taken off the time for spring training. Roberto Alomar (.560, 10 RBI, 9 R, .840 SLG, 2 SB) was the Series MVP and he was helped by Bernie Williams (.417, .875 SLG), Juan González (.375, .667 SLG), Edgar Martínez (.375, 9 RBI), Carlos Baerga, Rubén Sierra, a young Carlos Delgado hitting cleanup, Roberto Hernández, Rey Sánchez (.333), Doug Brocail (1-0, 1.00), José Alberro (1-0, 0.00 in 4 games), Eric Gunderson (1-0, 1.13), Ricky Bones and Chris Haney (2.45) among others. Sanchez had won the Puerto Rican Winter League batting title but batted 9th with the superb lineup in front of him.

1998 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1998 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 69th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 7, 1998, at Coors Field in Denver, Colorado, the home of the Colorado Rockies of the National League. The first All-Star contest played in the Mountain Time Zone, the game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 13-8. It remains the highest-scoring All-Star Game in MLB history.

The pregame ceremony honored the United States Air Force Academy who provided the five-man color guard, flag presentations, and, at the end of country music singer Faith Hill's performance of the U.S. National Anthem, the flyover ceremonies. Hill's National Anthem performance was preceded by actress Gloria Reuben's performance of The Canadian National Anthem.

Twelve-year-old Elias Kurts was given the honor of throwing out the ceremonial first pitch, the first "non-celebrity" so honored.

2011 Caribbean Series

The fifty-third edition of the Caribbean Series (Serie del Caribe) was played in 2011. It was held from February 2 through February 7 with the champions teams from Dominican Republic (Toros del Este), Mexico (Yaquis de Obregón), Puerto Rico (Criollos de Caguas) and Venezuela (Caribes de Anzoátegui). The format consisted of twelve games, in a double round-robin format with each team facing each other twice. The games were played at Isidoro García Stadium in Mayagüez, Puerto Rico.

The 2011 Caribbean Series was dedicated to Hall of Famer Roberto Alomar, as part of the annual tournament's events. In addition to having the Series dedicated to him, the organizing committee of the series announced that Alomar would be inducted into the Caribbean Series Hall of Fame, along with fellow countrymen and former big leaguers Carlos Baerga, Luis de León and Candy Maldonado. The Caribbean Baseball Hall of Fame was established in 1996 and honors stars in the Caribbean, primarily from the Caribbean Series.

Beaumont Golden Gators

The Beaumont Golden Gators were a minor league baseball team in the double A Texas League from 1983 to 1986. Owned by insurance man Ted Moor, the team was an affiliate of the San Diego Padres for their entire tenure. Future Major League Baseball players John Kruk, Roberto Alomar, Joey Cora, Ozzie Guillén, Sandy Alomar, Jr., Shane Mack, and Benito Santiago all played at one time for the Golden Gators. The team played its home games at Vincent-Beck Stadium on the campus of Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas and won the 1983 Texas League championship. Their uniforms were a gaudy gold, white, and green and the hats were of the historic pillbox variety with a white B surrounded by a golden triangle. The cities of Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Orange are known in local parlance as the "Golden Triangle." The oil bust in 1986 caused the local economy to falter and Moor sold the team to a group that moved them to Wichita, Kansas before the 1987 season, becoming the Wichita Pilots. The team spent 21 seasons in Wichita, being renamed to the Wichita Wranglers in 1989, before moving to Springdale, Arkansas and becoming the Northwest Arkansas Naturals. Prior to their time in Beaumont the team had been the Amarillo Gold Sox.

List of Gold Glove Award winners at second base

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985 and 2007), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in the entire league; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.Roberto Alomar leads second basemen in wins; he won 10 Gold Gloves in 11 years with three different American League teams. Ryne Sandberg has the second-highest total overall; his nine awards, all won with the Chicago Cubs, are the most by a National League player. Bill Mazeroski and Frank White are tied for the third-highest total, with eight wins. Mazeroski's were won with the Pittsburgh Pirates, and White won his with the Kansas City Royals. Joe Morgan and Bobby Richardson each won five Gold Glove Awards, and four-time winners include Craig Biggio (who won after converting to second base from catcher), Bret Boone, Bobby Grich, and Dustin Pedroia. Hall of Famers who won Gold Gloves at second base include Alomar, Sandberg, Mazeroski, Morgan, and Nellie Fox.Only one winning second baseman has had an errorless season; Plácido Polanco set a record among winners by becoming the first to post a season with no errors and, therefore, a 1.000 fielding percentage. The best mark in the National League was set by Sandberg in 1991, his final winning season. He committed four errors and amassed a .995 fielding percentage. Grich has made the most putouts in a season, with 484 in 1974. Fox made 453 putouts and the same number of assists in the award's inaugural season; this is more putouts than any National League player has achieved. Morgan set the National League mark, with 417 in 1973. Sandberg's 571 assists in 1983 are the most among winners in the major leagues; the American League leader is Grich, who made 509 in 1973. Mazeroski turned the most double plays by a winner, collecting 161 in 1966. The American League leader is Fox (141 double plays in 1957).

List of Silver Slugger Award winners at second base

The Silver Slugger Award is awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position in both the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), as determined by the coaches and managers of Major League Baseball (MLB). These voters consider several offensive categories in selecting the winners, including batting average, slugging percentage, and on-base percentage, in addition to "coaches' and managers' general impressions of a player's overall offensive value". Managers and coaches are not permitted to vote for players on their own team. The Silver Slugger was first awarded in 1980 and is given by Hillerich & Bradsby, the manufacturer of Louisville Slugger bats. The award is a bat-shaped trophy, 3 feet (91 cm) tall, engraved with the names of each of the winners from the league and plated with sterling silver.Among second basemen, Ryne Sandberg, who played 15 seasons with the Chicago Cubs in his 16-year career, owns the most Silver Sluggers with seven wins, including five consecutive from 1988 to 1992. Three other National League players have won the award four times. Jeff Kent (2000–2002, 2005) won three consecutive awards with the San Francisco Giants, before adding a fourth with the Los Angeles Dodgers; Craig Biggio, who played his entire career with the Houston Astros, won the award four times as a second baseman (1994–1995, 1997–1998) after winning another as a catcher. Chase Utley followed Kent's last win by capturing four consecutive awards (2006–2009).In the American League, José Altuve and Robinson Canó have won five Silver Slugger awards. Altuve won five consecutive awards (2014–2018), all with the Astros, while Cano won all five of his Silver Slugger awards as a member of the New York Yankees, including four consecutive wins (2006, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013). Altuve and Cano's five Silver Slugger awards are second-most all-time for a second baseman and first among American League winners, ahead of four second basemen who are all four-time winners in the American League. Roberto Alomar won the award at the same position with three different teams (Baltimore Orioles, Toronto Blue Jays, Cleveland Indians). Julio Franco won four consecutive awards (1988–1991) with two different teams, and Lou Whitaker won four awards in five years (1983–1985, 1987) with the Detroit Tigers.Altuve holds the record for the highest batting average in a second baseman's Silver Slugger-winning season with the .346 mark he set in 2017. In the National League, Daniel Murphy's .347 batting average in 2016 ranks first. Willie Randolph, who won the inaugural award in the 1980 season, set a record for on-base percentage (.427) that has not yet been broken. Chuck Knoblauch is second behind Randolph in the American League with a .424 on-base percentage, a mark that was tied by Jeff Kent in 2000 to set the National League record. That year, Kent also set the record among second basemen for highest slugging percentage (.596) and the National League record for runs batted in (125). Bret Boone is the overall leader in runs batted in (141) and holds the American League record for slugging percentage (.578); both of these records were established in 2001. Sandberg hit 40 home runs in 1990, the most ever by a second baseman in a winning season, while Alfonso Soriano set the American League mark with 39 in 2002.

Major League Baseball All-Star Game Most Valuable Player Award

The Major League Baseball All-Star Game Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award is an annual Major League Baseball (MLB) award which is presented to the most outstanding player in each year's MLB All-Star Game. Awarded each season since 1962 (two games were held and an award was presented to each game winner in 1962), it was originally called the "Arch Ward Memorial Award" in honor of Arch Ward, the man who conceived of the All-Star Game in 1933. The award's name was changed to the "Commissioner's Trophy" in 1970 (two National League (NL) players were presented the award in 1975), but this name change was reversed in 1985 when the World Series Trophy was renamed the Commissioner's Trophy. Finally, the trophy was renamed the Ted Williams Most Valuable Player Award in 2002, in honor of former Boston Red Sox player Ted Williams, who had died earlier that year. No award was presented for the 2002 All-Star Game, which ended in a tie. Thus, the Anaheim Angels' Garret Anderson was the first recipient of the newly named Ted Williams Award in 2003. The All-Star Game Most Valuable Player also receives a Chevrolet vehicle, choosing between two cars.As of 2018, NL players have won the award 27 times (including one award shared by two players), and American League (AL) players have won 30 times. Baltimore Orioles players have won the most awards for a single franchise (with six); players from the Cincinnati Reds, Los Angeles Dodgers and San Francisco Giants are tied for the most in the NL with five each. Five players have won the award twice: Willie Mays (1963, 1968), Steve Garvey (1974, 1978), Gary Carter (1981, 1984), Cal Ripken, Jr. (1991, 2001), and Mike Trout (2014, 2015). The award has been shared by multiple players once; Bill Madlock and Jon Matlack shared the award in 1975. Two players have won the award for a game in which their league lost: Brooks Robinson in 1966 and Carl Yastrzemski in 1970. One pair of awardees were father and son (Ken Griffey Sr. and Ken Griffey Jr.), and another were brothers (Roberto Alomar and Sandy Alomar, Jr.). Mike Trout of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim became the first player ever to win the MVP award in back-to-back years in the 86-year history of the MLB All-Star Game when he accomplished the feat in both 2014 and 2015. Alex Bregman of the Houston Astros is the most recent MLB All-Star Game MVP, winning the award in 2018. Only six players have won the MVP award in the only All-Star Game in which they appeared; LaMarr Hoyt, Bo Jackson, J. D. Drew, Melky Cabrera, Eric Hosmer, and Alex Bregman.

Rawlings Gold Glove Award

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as simply the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. It is also awarded to women fastpitch softball players in the National Pro Fastpitch as of 2016. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Additionally, a sabermetric component provided by Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) accounts for approximately 25 percent of the vote. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985, 2007, and 2018), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in Major League Baseball; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.

Sandy Alomar Jr.

Santos "Sandy" Alomar Velázquez Jr. (Spanish pronunciation: [aloˈmaɾ], ; born June 18, 1966) is a Puerto Rican professional baseball catcher, coach, and manager. He played in Major League Baseball catcher for the San Diego Padres, Cleveland Indians, Chicago White Sox, Colorado Rockies, Texas Rangers, Los Angeles Dodgers, and New York Mets between 1988 and 2007.Alomar is a six-time All-Star. He is the son of former major leaguer Sandy Alomar Sr. and the brother of Hall of Fame second baseman Roberto Alomar.

Sandy Alomar Sr.

Santos Alomar Conde Sr. (; Spanish pronunciation: [aloˈmaɾ]; born October 19, 1943), is a former Major League Baseball second baseman who played for the Milwaukee and Atlanta Braves (1964–66), New York Mets (1967), Chicago White Sox (1967–69), California Angels (1969–74), New York Yankees (1974–76), and Texas Rangers (1977–78). Alomar was a switch-hitter and threw right-handed. He is the father of former Major League catcher and current Cleveland Indians first base coach Sandy Alomar Jr. and Hall of Fame second baseman Roberto Alomar.

Second baseman

In baseball and softball, second baseman is a fielding position in the infield, between second and first base. The second baseman often possesses quick hands and feet, needs the ability to get rid of the ball quickly, and must be able to make the pivot on a double play. In addition, second basemen are usually right-handed; only four left-handed throwing players have ever played second base in Major League Baseball since 1950. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the second baseman is assigned the number 4.

Good second basemen need to have very good range since they have to field balls closer to the first baseman who is often holding runners on, or moving towards the base to cover. On a batted ball to right field, the second baseman goes out towards the ball for the relay. Due to these requirements, second base is sometimes a primarily defensive position in the modern game, but there are hitting stars as well.

Silver Slugger Award

The Silver Slugger Award is awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position in both the American League and the National League, as determined by the coaches and managers of Major League Baseball. These voters consider several offensive categories in selecting the winners, including batting average, slugging percentage, and on-base percentage, in addition to "coaches' and managers' general impressions of a player's overall offensive value". Managers and coaches are not permitted to vote for players on their own team. The Silver Slugger was first awarded in 1980 and is given by Hillerich & Bradsby, the manufacturer of Louisville Slugger bats. The award is a bat-shaped trophy, 3 feet (91 cm) tall, engraved with the names of each of the winners from the league and plated with sterling silver.The prize is presented to outfielders irrespective of their specific position. This means that it is possible for three left fielders, or any other combination of outfielders, to win the award in the same year, rather than one left fielder, one center fielder, and one right fielder. In addition, only National League pitchers receive a Silver Slugger Award; lineups in the American League include a designated hitter in place of the pitcher in the batting order, so the designated hitter receives the award instead.Home run record-holder Barry Bonds won twelve Silver Slugger Awards in his career as an outfielder, the most of any player. He also won the award in five consecutive seasons twice in his career: from 1990 to 1994, and again from 2000 to 2004. Retired former New York Mets catcher Mike Piazza and former New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez are tied for second, with ten wins each. Rodriguez' awards are split between two positions; he won seven Silver Sluggers as a shortstop for the Seattle Mariners and Texas Rangers, and three with the Yankees as a third baseman. Wade Boggs leads third basemen with eight Silver Slugger Awards; Barry Larkin leads shortstops with nine. Other leaders include Ryne Sandberg (seven wins as a second baseman) and Mike Hampton (five wins as a pitcher). Todd Helton and Albert Pujols are tied for the most wins among first baseman with four, although Pujols has won two awards at other positions. David Ortiz has won seven awards at designated hitter position, the most at that position.

Toronto Blue Jays

The Toronto Blue Jays are a Canadian professional baseball team based in Toronto, Ontario. The Blue Jays compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) East division. The team plays its home games at the Rogers Centre.

The "Blue Jays" name originates from the bird of the same name, and blue is also the traditional colour of two of Toronto's other professional sports teams: the Maple Leafs (ice hockey) and the Argonauts (Canadian football). In addition, the team was originally owned by the Labatt Brewing Company, makers of the popular beer Labatt's Blue. Colloquially nicknamed the "Jays", the team's official colours are royal blue, navy blue, red, and white. An expansion franchise, the club was founded in Toronto in 1977. Originally based at Exhibition Stadium, the team began playing its home games at the SkyDome upon its opening in 1989. Since 2000, the Blue Jays have been owned by Rogers Communications and in 2004, the SkyDome was purchased by that company, which renamed it Rogers Centre. They are the second MLB franchise to be based outside the United States, and currently the only team based outside the U.S. after the first Canadian franchise, the Montreal Expos, became the Washington Nationals in 2005.

In the late 1970s and early 1980s, the Blue Jays went through struggles typical of an expansion team, frequently finishing in last place in its division. In 1983, the team had its first winning season and two years later, they became division champions. From 1985 to 1993, they were an AL East powerhouse, winning five division championships in nine seasons, including three consecutive from 1991 to 1993. During that run, the team also became back-to-back World Series champions in 1992 and 1993, led by a core group of award-winning All-Star players, including Hall of Famer Roberto Alomar, Joe Carter, John Olerud, and Devon White. The Blue Jays became the first (and, to date, only) team outside the US to appear in and win a World Series, and the fastest AL expansion team to do so, winning in its 16th year. After 1993, the Blue Jays failed to qualify for the playoffs for 21 consecutive seasons, until clinching a playoff berth and division championship in 2015. The team clinched a second consecutive playoff berth in 2016, after securing an AL wild card position. Both years, the Jays won the AL Division Series but lost the AL Championship Series.

The Blue Jays are one of two MLB teams under corporate ownership, with the other being the Atlanta Braves (who are owned by Liberty Media).

BBWAA Vote
Veterans Committee
J. G. Taylor Spink Award
Ford C. Frick Award
Buck O'Neil Lifetime Achievement Award
Pitchers
Catchers
First basemen
Second basemen
Third basemen
Shortstops
Outfielders
Designated hitters
Managers
Executives /
pioneers
Umpires
Franchise
Ballparks
Culture
Lore
Rivalries
Retired numbers
Key personnel
World Series championships (2)
American League pennants (2)
Division titles (6)
Wild Card berths (1)
Minor league affiliates

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.