Robert Weinberg (author)

Robert Weinberg (also credited as Bob Weinberg, August 29, 1946 – September 25, 2016) was an American author, editor, publisher, and collector of science fiction. His work spans several genres including non-fiction, science fiction, horror, and comic books.

Robert Weinberg
BornRobert Edward Weinberg
August 29, 1946
Newark, New Jersey, United States
DiedSeptember 25, 2016 (aged 70)
Oak Forest, Illinois, United States
OccupationWriter, editor, publisher, book and art dealer
NationalityAmerican
GenreScience fiction
Horror
Superhero fiction
Western
Website
robertweinberg.net

Biography

Born in New Jersey in 1946, Weinberg sold his first story in 1967. Most of his writing career was conducted part-time while also owning a bookstore; he became a full-time writer after 1997.

Weinberg was also an editor, and edited books in the fields of horror, science fiction and western.

Weinberg graduated from Stevens Institute of Technology.

From 1970 to 1981, Weinberg edited and published Pulp, a fanzine devoted to pulp magazines; Pulp became noted for its interviews with pulp writers such as Walter B. Gibson and Frederick C. Davis.[1] He also published the Pulp Classics, Lost Fantasy, Weird Menace, and Incredible Adventures series of pulp reprints at the same time.

In comics, Weinberg wrote for Marvel Comics; his first job was on the series Cable, and he later created the series Nightside starring Sydney Taine a character who had previously appeared in a short story Weinberg wrote.[2]

Weinberg sat on the 'Council of Six', a board of editorial advisers for Canadian publisher Battered Silicon Dispatch Box. Along with another boardmember, George Vanderburgh, Weinberg took the editorial reins at Arkham House.

At Chicon 7, Weinberg received a Special Committee Award for his service to science fiction, fantasy, and horror.[3] Due to health issues, Weinberg was unable to attend and the award was accepted on his behalf by Jane Frank.[4] He died in Oak Forest, Illinois on September 25, 2016 at the age of 70.[5]

Bibliography

Anthologies edited

  • Far Below and Other Horrors (1974)
  • Revelry in Hell: Pulp Classics #3 (1974)
  • Doctor Satan: Pulp Classics #6 (1974)
  • Devils in the Dark (1979)
  • 100 Tiny Terror Tales (1984) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • The Eighth Green Man and Other Strange Folk (1987)
  • Weird Tales: 32 Unearthed Horrors (1988) (with Stefan R Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • Mists From Beyond: 22 Ghost Stories and Tales from the Other Side (1989) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • 100 Fiendish Little Frightmares (1990) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • Lovecraft's Legacy (1990) (with Martin H. Greenberg) Introduction by Robert Bloch
  • Between Time and Terror (1990) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • Rivals of Weird Tales (1990) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • A Taste for Blood (1991) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • Famous Fantastic Mysteries (1991) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • Hard-Boiled Detectives: 23 Great Stories from Dime Detective Magazine (1992) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz)
  • 100 Ghastly Little Ghost Stories (1992) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • Weird Vampire Tales (1992) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • To Sleep, Perchance to Dream...Nightmare (1993) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • 100 Dastardly Little Detective Stories (1993) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • Nursery Crimes (1993) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • Tough Guys and Dangerous Dames (1993)
  • 100 Wild Little Weird Tales (1994) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • 100 Crooked Little Crime Stories (1994) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • 100 Creepy Little Creature Stories (1994) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • 100 Vicious Little Vampire Stories (1995) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • 100 Wicked Little Witch Stories (1995) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • Great Writers and Kids Write Spooky Stories (1995) (with Martin H. Greenberg, Jill M. Morgan)
  • 100 Astounding Little Alien Stories (1996) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • Miskatonic University (1996) (with Martin H. Greenberg)
  • 100 Tiny Tales of Terror (1996) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • Rivals of Dracula (1996) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • Virtuous Vampires (1996) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • Girls' Night Out: 29 Female Vampire Stories (1997) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • Mistresses of the Dark: 25 Macabre Tales by Master Storytellers (1998) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Denise Little)
  • 100 Twisted Little Tales of Torment (1998) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • 100 Hilarious Little Howlers (1999) (with Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg)
  • Dial Your Dreams: And Other Nightmares (2001)
  • The Termination Node, Random House/Del Rey, science fiction novel, adult, 1999 hc/pb, co-author Lois H. Gresh
  • The Computers of Star Trek, Basic Books, science, adult, 2000 hc/trade, co-author Lois H. Gresh
  • The Science of Superheroes, John Wiley & Sons, science, adult, 2002 hc/trade, co-author Lois H. Gresh
  • The Science of Supervillains, John Wiley & Sons, science, adult, 2004 hc/trade,co-author Lois H. Gresh
  • The Science of James Bond, John Wiley & Sons, science, adult, 2006 trade, co-author Lois H. Gresh
  • The Science of Anime, science, adult, 2005 trade, co-author Lois H. Gresh
  • The Science of Stephen King, John Wiley & Sons, science, adult, 2007 hc, co-author Lois H. Gresh
  • The Many Mysteries of Indiana Jones, John Wiley & Sons, science, adult (2008), trade, co-author Lois H. Gresh

Books Written

  • The Weinberg-McKinstry Hero Pulp Index (1971) (with Lohr McKinstry) Caz Publications
  • The Weird Tales Story (1977) FAX Collector’s Editions
  • The Devil's Auction (1988) Owlswick Press
  • The Armageddon Box (1991) Wildside Press
  • The Black Lodge (1991 Wildside Press
  • The Dead Man's Kiss (1992) - Pocket Books
  • A Logical Magician (1994) Ace Books
  • Masquerade of the Red Death Trilogy (1995) White Wolf Publishing
  • The Horizon War Trilogy (1996) White Wolf Publishing
  • A Calculated Magic (1996) Ace Books

Comics

Comics work includes:

  • Cable #79-96 (with art by Michael Ryan, Marvel Comics, 2000-2001)
  • Nightside (with art by Thomas Derenick, 4-issue mini-series, Marvel Comics, 2002)
  • Extinction Event (WildStorm, 2003-2004)

Notes

  1. ^ Marvin Lachman, The Heirs of Anthony Boucher, Poisoned Pen Press Inc., ISBN 978-1-61595-286-1 (p. 63).
  2. ^ Sydney Taine at the Appendix to the Handbook of the Marvel Universe
  3. ^ "Weird Tales Interview with Robert Weinberg".
  4. ^ Silver, Steven (September 4, 2012). "Hugo Award Winners". SF Site News. SF Site.com. Retrieved September 5, 2012.
  5. ^ http://www.locusmag.com/News/2016/09/robert-e-weinberg-1946-2016/

References

External links

2016 in the United States

Events in the year 2016 in the United States.

Extinction Event

Extinction Event or variation may refer to:

Extinction event or mass extinction, in biology and paleontology

The Extinction Event (audio drama), a Doctor Who audio play

Extinction Event, a card in the collectible card game Plants vs. Zombies Heroes

Extinction Event (2009 novel) a spinoff novel of Primeval by Dan Abnett, see Dan Abnett bibliography

Extinction Event (2003 comic book) a limited series comic published by WildStorm (DC), written by Robert Weinberg (author)

Weird Tales

Weird Tales is an American fantasy and horror fiction pulp magazine founded by J. C. Henneberger and J. M. Lansinger in late 1922. The first issue, dated March 1923, appeared on newsstands February 18th. The first editor, Edwin Baird, printed early work by H. P. Lovecraft, Seabury Quinn, and Clark Ashton Smith, all of whom would go on to be popular writers, but within a year the magazine was in financial trouble. Henneberger sold his interest in the publisher, Rural Publishing Corporation, to Lansinger and refinanced Weird Tales, with Farnsworth Wright as the new editor. The first issue under Wright's control was dated November 1924. The magazine was more successful under Wright, and despite occasional financial setbacks it prospered over the next fifteen years. Under Wright's control the magazine lived up to its subtitle, "The Unique Magazine", and published a wide range of unusual fiction.

Lovecraft's Cthulhu mythos stories first appeared in Weird Tales, starting with "The Call of Cthulhu" in 1928. These were well-received, and a group of writers associated with Lovecraft wrote other stories set in the same milieu. Robert E. Howard was a regular contributor, and published several of his Conan the Barbarian stories in the magazine, and Seabury Quinn's series of stories about Jules de Grandin, a detective who specialized in cases involving the supernatural, was very popular with the readers. Other well-liked authors included Nictzin Dyalhis, E. Hoffmann Price, Robert Bloch, and H. Warner Munn. Wright published some science fiction, along with the fantasy and horror, partly because when Weird Tales was launched there were no magazines specializing in science fiction, but he continued this policy even after the launch of magazines such as Amazing Stories in 1926. Edmond Hamilton wrote a good deal of science fiction for Weird Tales, though after a few years he used the magazine for his more fantastic stories, and submitted his space operas elsewhere.

In 1938 the magazine was sold to William Delaney, the publisher of Short Stories, and within two years Wright, who was ill, was replaced by Dorothy McIlwraith as editor. Although some successful new authors and artists, such as Ray Bradbury and Hannes Bok, continued to appear, the magazine is considered by critics to have declined under McIlwraith from its heyday in the 1930s. Weird Tales ceased publication in 1954, but since then numerous attempts have been made to relaunch the magazine, starting in 1973. The longest-lasting version began in 1988 and ran with an occasional hiatus for over 20 years under an assortment of publishers. In the mid-1990s the title was changed to Worlds of Fantasy & Horror because of licensing issues, with the original title returning in 1998. As of 2018, the most recent published issue was dated Spring 2014.

The magazine is regarded by historians of fantasy and science fiction as a legend in the field, with Robert Weinberg, author of a history of the magazine, considering it "the most important and influential of all fantasy magazines". Weinberg's fellow historian, Mike Ashley, is more cautious, describing it as "second only to Unknown in significance and influence", adding that "somewhere in the imagination reservoir of all U.S. (and many non-U.S.) genre-fantasy and horror writers is part of the spirit of Weird Tales".

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