Robert Shaye

Robert Kenneth Shaye (born March 4, 1939) is an American businessman, film producer, actor, and the founder of New Line Cinema.[2]

Robert Shaye
Robert Shaye portrait
Born
Robert Kenneth Shaye

March 4, 1939 (age 79)
Alma materUniversity of Michigan
Columbia Law School
OccupationFilm producer, film director, writer, actor
Years active1980s – present
Known forFounder of New Line Cinema
Spouse(s)
Eva G. Lindstern (m. 1970)
[1]
Children2
RelativesLin Shaye (sister)

Biography

Early life

Shaye was born to a Jewish[3] family in Detroit, Michigan, the son of Dorothy and Max Mendle Shaye, a supermarket owner and artist.[1] His mother was an immigrant from Russia.[3] He is the brother of actress Lin Shaye.[3]

Shaye graduated from Detroit's Mumford High School. He earned a bachelor's degree in business administration from the University of Michigan and a J.D. degree from Columbia Law School. He also graduated from the University of Stockholm as a Fulbright scholar. Shaye is a member of the New York State Bar Association, and he has served on the board of trustees for the Neurosciences Institute, the Legal Aid Society, the American Film Institute, and the Will Rogers Motion Picture Pioneers Foundation.[2]

Film career

In 1967, Shaye formed New Line Cinema. The company started with a package of feature films and shorts rented to colleges. From there, New Line expanded to re-releases such as Reefer Madness and first-run domestic distribution of foreign films such as 1978's Get Out Your Handkerchiefs. New Line also released such films as A Nightmare on Elm Street and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.

Other New Line films were The Mask, Dumb and Dumber, Seven, the Austin Powers film series, Boogie Nights, The Wedding Singer, Blade, Rush Hour, and the Final Destination franchise. New Line also distributed the critically acclaimed documentary Hoop Dreams in 1994 through its specialty films division, Fine Line Features.

In 1998, when director Peter Jackson brought his 25-minute pitch reel for a big screen adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings to New Line, hoping to turn the three volumes into two films, Shaye suggested Jackson make three films. He subsequently greenlit a simultaneous production for all three installments.[2] The Lord of the Rings trilogy was nominated for 30 Oscars, winning 17, including 11 awards for The Return of the King, including Best Picture, Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay. At the box office, all three films are among the top 50 highest-grossing films of all time, earning a combined total of nearly $3 billion worldwide.

Later films distributed by New Line include Freddy vs. Jason, Elf, The Notebook, Monster-in-Law, Wedding Crashers, A History of Violence, Pan's Labyrinth, and Hairspray.

Unique Features

In June 2008, Shaye and company co-chairman Michael Lynne departed New Line and formed an independent film company, Unique Features. The company's recent projects include The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones (Sony/Constantin), the TV series Shadowhunters (Freeform Television), When the Bough Breaks (Screen Gems), and Ambition, directed by Shaye.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Robert Shaye Biography". Filmreference.com.
  2. ^ a b c DiGiacomo, Frank (February 4, 2009). "The Lost Tycoons". Vanity Fair.
  3. ^ a b c Sheridan, Patricia (June 1, 2015). "Patricia Sheridan's Breakfast With ... Lin Shaye". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.
  4. ^ Busch, Anita (March 16, 2016). "Robert Shaye And Michael Lynne Pair For New Film 'Gifted'". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved February 9, 2017.

External links

18th Saturn Awards

The 18th Saturn Awards, honoring the best in science fiction, fantasy and horror film and television in 1991, were held on March 13, 1992.

A Nightmare on Elm Street

A Nightmare on Elm Street is a 1984 American slasher film written and directed by Wes Craven, and produced by Robert Shaye. It stars Heather Langenkamp, John Saxon, Ronee Blakley, Amanda Wyss, Jsu Garcia, Robert Englund, and Johnny Depp in his film debut. The plot concerns four teenagers living on one street in the fictitious town of Springwood, Ohio, who are invaded and killed in their dreams, and thus killed in reality, by a burnt killer with a bladed leather glove.

Craven filmed A Nightmare on Elm Street on an estimated budget of $1.8 million, a sum the film earned back during its first week. The film was released on November 9, 1984, where it went on to gross over $25 million at the United States box office. A Nightmare on Elm Street was met with rave critical reviews and is considered to be one of the greatest horror films ever made, spawning a franchise consisting of a line of sequels, a television series, a crossover with Friday the 13th, and various other works of imitation. A remake of the same name was released in 2010.The film is credited with using many of the tropes found in the low-budget horror films of the 1970s and 1980s that originated with John Carpenter's Halloween (1978) and led this subgenre to be called the slasher film. The film includes a morality play where sexually promiscuous teenagers are killed. Critics and film historians state that the film's premise is the struggle to define the distinction between dreams and reality, manifested by the lives and dreams of the teens in the film. Critics today praise the film's ability to transgress "the boundaries between the imaginary and real", toying with audience perceptions.

A Nightmare on Elm Street (franchise)

A Nightmare on Elm Street is an American horror franchise that consists of nine slasher films, a television series, novels, and comic books. The films began with the film A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) created by Wes Craven. The series revolves around the fictional character Freddy Krueger, a former child killer who after being burned alive by the vengeful parents of his victims, returns from the grave to terrorize and kill the teenage residents of Springwood, Ohio in their dreams. The original film was written and directed by Craven, who returned to co-script the second sequel, A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors (1987), and to write and direct New Nightmare (1994). The films collectively grossed over $457 million at the box-office worldwide.

The original film was released in 1984. A series of sequels produced by the independent film company New Line Cinema followed. New Line often attributes the growth of their company to the success of the Nightmare series. The film series as a whole has received mixed reviews by critics, but has been a financial success at the box office. When comparing the United States box office grosses of other American horror film series, A Nightmare on Elm Street is the second highest grossing series in adjusted US dollars. In 1988, a television series was produced with Freddy as the host. The pilot episode focused on the night Freddy was burned alive by the angry parents of the children he had killed, though the rest of the series featured episodes with independent plots. Twelve novels, separate from the adaptations of the films, and multiple comic book series were published featuring Freddy Krueger, as well as a crossover film featuring fellow horror icon Jason Voorhees from the Friday the 13th franchise. A remake of the 1984 film was released in 2010, and a second remake is planned.

Book of Love (1990 film)

Book of Love is a 1990 American romantic comedy film directed by New Line Cinema producer Robert Shaye. It is based on the autobiographical novel Jack in the Box by William Kotzwinkle (the novel's name was changed to Book of Love during this film's original release).

The film was originally PG-13, but subsequent DVD releases have been the R-rated Director's Cut (R for sexual content and language). It stars Chris Young, Keith Coogan, and John Cameron Mitchell.

Divine Trash

Divine Trash is a 1998 documentary film directed by Steve Yeager about the life and work of John Waters.

Gargoyle Humor Magazine

Gargoyle Humor Magazine or The Gargoyle is the official student-run humor magazine for the University of Michigan. It has been satirizing both local and national events for more than one hundred years. The magazine is part of the University's Student Publications, which also includes the campus newspaper, The Michigan Daily, as well as the yearbook, the Michiganensian.

To current and former editors and staff, the magazine is often known simply as The Garg.

Gotham Independent Film Awards 1995

The 5th Annual Gotham Independent Film Awards, presented by the Independent Filmmaker Project, were held on September 19, 1995 and were hosted by Michael Moore. At the ceremony, Robert Shaye was honored with a Career Tribute with Abel Ferrara, Christopher Walken, Pauline Kael and Juliet Taylor receiving the other individual awards.

Jeffrey Reddick

Jeffrey Reddick (born July 12, 1969) is an American screenwriter and film director, best known for creating the Final Destination franchise.

Lin Shaye

Linda Shaye (born October 12, 1943) is an American theater, film, and television actress. In a career spanning over forty years, she has appeared in over ninety feature films and is regarded as a scream queen due to her roles in various horror franchises or films including A Nightmare on Elm Street, Critters, Insidious, Dead End, 2001 Maniacs and its sequel 2001 Maniacs: Field of Screams, Alone in the Dark, Amityville: A New Generation, Tales of Halloween, Abattoir, Ouija, and its prequel Ouija: Origin of Evil. Shaye is also known for her comedic roles in many films by the Farrelly brothers, including Dumb and Dumber, Kingpin, and There's Something About Mary.

Lost Soul (2014 film)

Lost Soul: The Doomed Journey of Richard Stanley’s Island of Dr. Moreau is a 2014 documentary that was directed by David Gregory. The film had its world premiere at the London FrightFest Film Festival on August 24, 2014, and covers Richard Stanley's experiences while he conceived and developed the project, as well as his time as director for the 1996 film The Island of Dr. Moreau and the aftermath of his departure and the effect it had on the cast, crew, and overall film.

New Line Cinema

New Line Productions Inc., doing business as New Line Cinema, is an American film production studio of Warner Bros. It was founded in 1967 by Robert Shaye as an independent film distribution company, later becoming a film studio. It was acquired by Turner Broadcasting System in 1994; Turner later merged with Time Warner (now WarnerMedia) in 1996, and New Line was merged with Warner Bros. Pictures in 2008. Currently, its films are distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures.

Peter Deming

Peter Deming, A.S.C. (born December 13, 1957) is an American cinematographer, winner of the Independent Spirit Award for Best Cinematography. He is known for his collaborations with film directors like Sam Raimi, David Lynch and Wes Craven.

Deming was born in Beirut, Lebanon.

Shaye (name)

Shaye is a given name and surname.

Stunts (film)

Stunts, also released as The Deadly Game, is a 1977 film directed by Mark L. Lester and starring Robert Forster.

The Last Mimzy

The Last Mimzy is a 2007 American science fiction adventure drama film directed by Robert Shaye and loosely adapted from the 1943 science fiction short story "Mimsy Were the Borogoves" by Lewis Padgett (the pseudonym of husband-and-wife team Henry Kuttner and C. L. Moore). The film features Timothy Hutton, Joely Richardson, Rainn Wilson, Kathryn Hahn, Michael Clarke Duncan, and introducing Rhiannon Leigh Wryn as seven-year-old Emma Wilder and Chris O’Neil as ten-year-old Noah.

The President's Memorial Award

The President's Memorial Award or President's Award is presented by the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films, in conjunction with their annual Saturn Award ceremony. The award is given for quality genre entertainment, and is named in honor of Academy founder, Dr. Donald A. Reed.

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