Robert Jordan

James Oliver Rigney Jr. (October 17, 1948 – September 16, 2007), better known by his pen name Robert Jordan,[1] was an American author of epic fantasy. He is best known for the Wheel of Time series, which comprises 14 books and a prequel novel. He is one of several writers to have written original Conan the Barbarian novels; his are highly acclaimed to this day.[2] Rigney also wrote historical fiction under his pseudonym Reagan O'Neal, a western as Jackson O'Reilly, and dance criticism as Chang Lung. Additionally, he ghostwrote an "international thriller" that is still believed to have been written by someone else.[3][4][5][6][7]

Robert Jordan
Jordan in 2005
Jordan in 2005
BornJames Oliver Rigney Jr.
October 17, 1948
Charleston, South Carolina, U.S.
DiedSeptember 16, 2007 (aged 58)
Charleston, South Carolina, U.S.
OccupationNovelist
GenreFantasy
Notable worksThe Wheel of Time

Early life

Jordan was born in Charleston, South Carolina. He served two tours in Vietnam (from 1968 to 1970) with the United States Army as a helicopter gunner. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross with oak leaf cluster, the Bronze Star with "V" and oak leaf cluster, and two Vietnamese Gallantry Crosses with palm. After returning from Vietnam he attended The Citadel, where he received an undergraduate degree in physics; after graduating he was employed by the United States Navy as a nuclear engineer.[8] He began writing in 1977.

Personal life

He was a history buff and enjoyed hunting, fishing, sailing, poker, chess, pool, and pipe-collecting. He described himself as a "High Church" Episcopalian[9] and received communion more than once a week.[10] He lived with his wife, Harriet McDougal, who works as a book editor (currently with Tor Books; she was also Jordan's editor) in a house built in 1797.[11]

Illness and death

On March 23, 2006, Jordan disclosed in a statement[12] that he had been diagnosed with cardiac amyloidosis, and that with treatment, his median life expectancy was four years, though he said he intended to beat the statistics. He later posted on his Dragonmount blog to encourage his fans not to worry about him and announce that he intended to have a long and fully creative life.

He began chemotherapy treatment at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, in early April 2006.[13] Jordan was enrolled in a study using the drug Revlimid just approved for multiple myeloma but not yet tested on primary amyloidosis.[14]

Jordan died at approximately 2:45 p.m. EDT on September 16, 2007,[15] and his funeral service was held on Wednesday, September 19, 2007.[16] Jordan was cremated and his ashes buried in the churchyard of St. James Church in Goose Creek, outside Charleston, South Carolina.[17][18]

Jordan's papers can be found at the Special Collections at the College of Charleston.[19]

Selected works

The Wheel of Time
0. New Spring (2004) Prequel set 20 years before the events of the first novel.
1. The Eye of the World (1990)
2. The Great Hunt (1990)
3. The Dragon Reborn (1991)
4. The Shadow Rising (1992)
5. The Fires of Heaven (1993)
6. Lord of Chaos (1994)
7. A Crown of Swords (1996)
8. The Path of Daggers (1998)
9. Winter's Heart (2000)
10. Crossroads of Twilight (2003)
11. Knife of Dreams (2005)
12. The Gathering Storm (2009) coauthored by Brandon Sanderson
13. Towers of Midnight (2010) coauthored by Brandon Sanderson
14. A Memory of Light (2013) coauthored by Brandon Sanderson
Conan the Barbarian
  1. Conan the Invincible (1982)
  2. Conan the Defender (1982)
  3. Conan the Unconquered (1983)
  4. Conan the Triumphant (1983)
  5. Conan the Magnificent (1984)
  6. Conan the Destroyer (1984)
  7. Conan the Victorious (1984)

References

  1. ^ "Robert Jordan" was the name of the protagonist in the 1940 Hemingway novel For Whom the Bell Tolls, though this is not how the name was chosen according to a 1997 interview he did on the DragonCon SciFi Channel Chat.
  2. ^ Byrne, Bob. "Walking Through the Valley: What I'm Reading – 8/26/10 " (review), August 31, September 1, 2010.
  3. ^ Ross (September 2005). "Radio Dead Air Interview with Robert Jordan". Radio Dead Air. Retrieved 2012-04-16.
  4. ^ "Science Fiction Book Club Interview with Robert Jordan". SFBC. January 2001. Retrieved 2012-04-16.
  5. ^ Aan'allein (2001-04-04). "Leiden Signing Report". Emma de Laat. Retrieved 2012-04-16.
  6. ^ "Barnes & Noble Chat with Robert Jordan". Seven Spokes. 1997-11-11. Retrieved 2012-04-16.
  7. ^ Tahir Velimeev (September 2000). "Wanderer Fantasy Convention - Interview with Robert Jordan". Theoryland. Retrieved 2012-04-16.
  8. ^ Jordan, Robert (June 1, 2007). Dragonmount, the Robert Jordan blog. p. 85 http://www.dragonmount.com/RobertJordan/?p=85. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  9. ^ Jordan, Robert (June 1, 2007). Dragonmount, the Robert Jordan blog. p. 85 http://www.dragonmount.com/RobertJordan/?p=85. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  10. ^ Jordan, Robert (September 27, 2007). Dragonmount, the Robert Jordan blog. p. 92 http://www.dragonmount.com/RobertJordan/?p=92. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  11. ^ "Robert Jordan and the Wheel of Time". Archived from the original on October 12, 2007. Retrieved August 10, 2009.
  12. ^ "Statement from Robert Jordan about his health in Locus Magazine".
  13. ^ Jordan, Robert (March 25, 2006). "Important note". Tor Books.
  14. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on August 12, 2011. Retrieved 2006-04-21.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link) CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  15. ^ "Jordan's death". Dragonmount. Retrieved 2011-11-28.
  16. ^ "The Post and Courier". Charleston.net. 2007-09-20. Archived from the original on 2012-07-21. Retrieved 2011-11-28.
  17. ^ "Robert Jordan (1948 - 2007) - Find A Grave Memorial". Findagrave.com. Retrieved 2011-11-28.
  18. ^ ""The Stone" - Entry in Robert Jordan's Blog at Dragonmount, dated October 6, 2008". Dragonmount.com. Retrieved 2011-11-28.
  19. ^ "Inventory of the James Oliver Rigney, Jr., Papers, 1905-2012". archives.library.cofc.edu. Retrieved 2019-01-07.

Further reading

  • "Robert Jordan". The Times. September 19, 2007. Retrieved September 22, 2007.

External links

A Crown of Swords

A Crown of Swords is a fantasy novel by American author Robert Jordan, the seventh book of The Wheel of Time. It was published by Tor Books and released on May 15, 1996. A Crown of Swords consists of a prologue and 41 chapters.

A Memory of Light

A Memory of Light is the 14th and final book of the fantasy series The Wheel of Time, written by American authors Robert Jordan and Brandon Sanderson, and published by Tor books. Originally expected to have been published around March 2012, the book was delayed several times, and the hardcover edition was eventually released on January 8, 2013. The e-book was not released until April 8, 2013. The book reached No. 1 on several bestsellers lists.

Conan (books)

The Conan books are sword and sorcery fantasies featuring the character of Conan the Cimmerian originally created by Robert E. Howard. Written by numerous authors and issued by numerous publishers, they include both novels and short stories, the latter assembled in various combinations over the years by the several publishers. The character has proven durably popular, resulting in Conan stories being produced after Howard's death by such later writers as Poul Anderson, Leonard Carpenter, Lin Carter, L. Sprague de Camp, Roland J. Green, John C. Hocking, Robert Jordan, Sean A. Moore, Björn Nyberg, Andrew J. Offutt, Steve Perry, John Maddox Roberts, Harry Turtledove, and Karl Edward Wagner. Some of these writers finished incomplete Conan manuscripts by Howard, or rewrote Howard stories which originally featured different characters. Most post-Howard Conan stories, however, are completely original works. In total, more than fifty novels and dozens of short stories featuring the Conan character have been written by authors other than Howard. This article describes and discusses notable book editions of the Conan stories.

Conan the Defender

Conan the Defender is a fantasy novel by American writer Robert Jordan, featuring Robert E. Howard's sword and sorcery hero Conan the Barbarian. It was first published in trade paperback by Tor Books in December 1982, followed by a regular paperback edition in December 1983. The book was reprinted by Tor in February 1991 and September 2009. The first British edition was published by Legend in September 1996. It was later gathered together with Conan the Invincible and Conan the Unconquered into the omnibus collection The Conan Chronicles (Tor Books, 1995).

Conan the Destroyer (novel)

Conan the Destroyer is a fantasy novel written by Robert Jordan featuring Robert E. Howard's seminal sword and sorcery hero Conan the Barbarian, a novelization of the feature film of the same name. It was first published in paperback by Tor Books in 1984.

Conan the Invincible

Conan the Invincible is a fantasy novel by American writer Robert Jordan, featuring Robert E. Howard's sword and sorcery hero Conan the Barbarian. It was first published in paperback by Tor Books in June 1982 and reprinted in July 1990; a trade paperback edition followed from the same publisher in 1998. The first British edition was published in paperback by Sphere Books in September 1989; a later British edition was published in paperback by Legend Books in August 1996. It was later gathered together with Conan the Defender and Conan the Unconquered into the hardcover omnibus collection The Conan Chronicles (Tor Books, July 1995).

Conan the Unconquered

Conan the Unconquered is a fantasy novel by American writer Robert Jordan, featuring Robert E. Howard's seminal sword and sorcery hero Conan the Barbarian. It was first published in paperback by Tor Books in April 1983, and reprinted on a number of occasions. The first British edition was published by Sphere Books in February 1988. The first trade paperback edition was published by Tor in 1991. It was later gathered together with Conan the Invincible and Conan the Defender into the omnibus collection The Conan Chronicles (Tor Books, 1995).

For Whom the Bell Tolls

For Whom the Bell Tolls is a novel by Ernest Hemingway published in 1940. It tells the story of Robert Jordan, a young American in the International Brigades attached to a republican guerrilla unit during the Spanish Civil War. As a dynamiter, he is assigned to blow up a bridge during an attack on the city of Segovia.

The novel is regarded as one of Hemingway's best works, along with The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, and The Old Man and the Sea.

For Whom the Bell Tolls (film)

For Whom the Bell Tolls is a 1943 American war film produced and directed by Sam Wood and starring Gary Cooper, Ingrid Bergman, Akim Tamiroff, Katina Paxinou and Joseph Calleia. The screenwriter Dudley Nichols based his script on the 1940 novel For Whom the Bell Tolls by American novelist Ernest Hemingway. The film is about an American International Brigades volunteer, Robert Jordan (Cooper), who is fighting in the Spanish Civil War against the fascists. During his desperate mission to blow up a strategically important bridge to protect Republican forces, Jordan falls in love with a young woman guerrilla fighter (Bergman).

For Whom the Bell Tolls was Ingrid Bergman's first Technicolor film. Hemingway handpicked Cooper and Bergman for their roles. The film was one of the biggest films of 1943, earning $6.3 million in distributor rentals in the United States and Canada. A re-issue in 1957 earned an additional $800,0000. It was also nominated for nine Academy Awards, winning one. Victor Young's film soundtrack for the film was the first complete score from an American film to be issued on record.

Magic in fiction

Magic in fiction is the endowment of characters or objects in works of fiction with powers that do not naturally occur in the real world.

Magic often serves as a plot device and has long been a component of fiction, from the days of Homer and Apuleius down through the tales of the Holy Grail and King Arthur, to more contemporary authors such as J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, Ursula K. Le Guin, Robert Jordan, Terry Brooks, J.K. Rowling, Mercedes Lackey, and Derek Landy.

New Spring

New Spring is a fantasy novel by American author Robert Jordan, a prequel in the Wheel of Time series. New Spring consists of 26 chapters and an epilogue.

Robert B. Jordan

Robert Byrd Jordan III (born October 11, 1932) is an American politician who served as the 29th Lieutenant Governor of North Carolina for one term (1985–1989) under Governor James G. Martin and who unsuccessfully ran for Governor of North Carolina in 1988.

Jordan, a native of Mount Gilead, North Carolina, graduated from North Carolina State University in 1954 with honors in forestry. Prior to being elected lieutenant governor, Jordan ran his family's lumber company and served in the North Carolina Senate as a Democrat from 1976-84.In 1984, he defeated state House Speaker Carl J. Stewart, Jr. in a hard-fought Democratic primary, then defeated Republican John H. Carrington in the general election to become North Carolina's 29th lieutenant governor. He easily won the 1988 gubernatorial nomination but lost the general election to incumbent James G. Martin.An advocate of education, Jordan has served on the North Carolina Board of Education, the state Board of Community Colleges, and the University of North Carolina System Board of Governors. On May 20, 2009, Jordan was elected chairman of the Trustees of North Carolina State University to serve the remaining term of McQueen Campbell, who resigned in conjunction with the investigation of Mike Easley.

The Conan Chronicles (Robert Jordan)

The Conan Chronicles is a collection of fantasy novels by American writers Robert Jordan, featuring the sword and sorcery hero Conan the Barbarian created by Robert E. Howard. The book was published in 1995 by Tor Books and collects three novels previously published by Tor.

The Conan Chronicles II

The Conan Chronicles II is a collection of fantasy novels written by Robert Jordan featuring the sword and sorcery hero Conan the Barbarian, created by Robert E. Howard. The book was published in 1997 by Legend Books and collects three novels originally published by Tor Books.

The Eye of the World

The Eye of the World is a fantasy novel by American writer Robert Jordan, the first book of The Wheel of Time series. It was published by Tor Books and released on January 16, 1990. The unabridged audiobook is read by Michael Kramer and Kate Reading. Upon first publication, The Eye of the World consisted of one prologue and 53 chapters, with an additional prologue authored upon re-release.

On January 2, 2002, The Eye of the World was re-released as two separate books aimed at a young adult literature market, with larger text and a handful of illustrations. These were From the Two Rivers and To the Blight. The former included an additional prologue entitled "Ravens", focusing on Egwene al'Vere. The American Library Association put The Eye of the World on its 2003 list of Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults.

The Fires of Heaven

The Fires of Heaven is a fantasy novel by American writer Robert Jordan, the fifth book in his series The Wheel of Time. It was published by Tor Books and released on October 15, 1993.

It is the first novel in the series to not involve an appearance by each of the three ta'veren from the Two Rivers, due to Perrin's absence. The Fires of Heaven consists of a prologue and 56 chapters.

The Further Chronicles of Conan

The Further Chronicles of Conan is a collection of fantasy novels written by Robert Jordan featuring the sword and sorcery hero Conan the Barbarian, created by Robert E. Howard. The book was first published in hardcover in October 1999 by Tor Books, with a trade paperback edition following in September 2004 from the same publisher. It collects three novels previously published by Tor.

The Great Hunt

The Great Hunt is a fantasy novel by American author Robert Jordan, the second book of The Wheel of Time series. It was published by Tor Books and released on November 15, 1990. The Great Hunt consists of a prologue and 50 chapters. In 2004 The Great Hunt was re-released as two separate books, The Hunt Begins and New Threads in the Pattern.

The story features young heroes Rand al'Thor, Mat Cauthon, and Perrin Aybara, who join Shienaren soldiers in a quest to retrieve the Horn of Valere. At the same time, Egwene al'Vere, Nynaeve al'Meara, and Elayne Trakand go to the White Tower in Tar Valon to learn Aes Sedai ways. Finally, an exotic army invades the western coast.

The Wheel of Time

The Wheel of Time is a series of high fantasy novels written by American author James Oliver Rigney Jr., under his pen name of Robert Jordan. Originally planned as a six-book series, The Wheel of Time spanned fourteen volumes, in addition to a prequel novel and two companion books. Jordan began writing the first volume, The Eye of the World, in 1984, and it was published in January 1990.The author died in 2007 while working on what was planned to be the twelfth and final volume in the series. He prepared extensive notes so another author could complete the book according to his wishes. Fellow fantasy author and long-time Wheel of Time fan Brandon Sanderson was brought in to complete the final book, but during the writing process it was decided that the book would be far too large to be published in one volume and would instead be published as three volumes: The Gathering Storm (2009), Towers of Midnight (2010), and A Memory of Light (2013).

The series draws on numerous elements of both European and Asian mythology, most notably the cyclical nature of time found in Buddhism and Hinduism, the metaphysical concepts of balance and duality, and a respect for nature found in Taoism. Additionally, its creation story has similarities to Christianity's "Creator" (Light) and Shai'tan, "The Dark One" (Shaitan is an Arabic word that, in religious contexts, is used as a name for the Devil). It was also partly inspired by Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace (1869).The Wheel of Time is notable for its length, detailed imaginary world, well-developed magic system, and large cast of characters. The eighth through fourteenth books each reached number one on the New York Times Best Seller list. After its completion, the series was nominated for a Hugo Award. According to Jordan's French publisher, as of 2017, the series has sold over 80 million copies worldwide, and is the best selling epic fantasy series since The Lord of the Rings. Its popularity has spawned an eponymous video game, roleplaying game, and soundtrack album. On April 20, 2017, it was announced that Sony Pictures will adapt the series for television and on October 2, 2018, Amazon ordered the series with Sony as a co-producer.

The Wheel of Time, written by Robert Jordan and completed by Brandon Sanderson
The Wheel of Time
Companion publications
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