Robert Craft

Robert Lawson Craft (October 20, 1923 – November 10, 2015) was an American conductor[1] and writer. He is best known for his intimate working friendship with Igor Stravinsky, on which Craft drew in producing numerous recordings and books.

Stravinski-1961-Helsinki
Robert Craft (left) with Kai Maasalo and Igor Stravinsky (right) on their visit to Helsinki in 1961.

Life

Craft was born in Kingston, New York to Raymond and Arpha Craft and studied music at the Juilliard School. He became particularly interested in early music and the music of Claudio Monteverdi, Carlo Gesualdo, and Heinrich Schütz, and in contemporary music by the composers of the Second Viennese School and others.

Craft met Stravinsky in 1948, and from then until the composer's death in 1971, Craft continued to work alongside Stravinsky in a variety of roles. A relationship that started out with Craft in a rather modest role eventually evolved into a full artistic partnership. Craft compiled the libretti for Stravinsky's The Flood and A Sermon, a Narrative and a Prayer, and lived with Igor and Vera Stravinsky in Hollywood and later in New York City. Craft remained close to the composer's widow until her death in 1982.

After Stravinsky's death, Craft continued to concertize and to write. His 2002 book, An Improbable Life, details his life before, during, and after his friendship with Stravinsky. The memoir elaborates on the impact that Igor Stravinsky had on his life.

Shortly after Stravinsky’s death, Craft married the composer’s longtime nurse, Rita Christiansen, though the marriage did not endure. His survivors include a son from that marriage, Alexander; a sister, Phyllis Crawford; his second wife, the former Alva Celauro Minoff, a singer and actress; two stepchildren, Edward Minoff and Melissa Minoff; and four grandchildren.

Craft died on November 10, 2015, at his home in Gulf Stream, Florida.[2][3]

Writing

Craft collaborated with Stravinsky on a series of books that covered various musical and non-musical subjects: Conversations with Igor Stravinsky (1959); Memories and Commentaries (1960); Expositions and Developments (1962); Dialogues and a Diary (1963); Themes and Episodes (1967); Retrospectives and Conclusions (1969). They include transcribed conversations between the two men, interviews culled from various published sources, essays, diary entries, and the like, all with the professed aim of presenting Stravinsky's views on music and culture.

Conducting

Craft was a conductor with most of the major orchestras in the United States (New York Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Cleveland Orchestra, San Francisco Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, St. Louis Symphony, and Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra), as well as international engagements in Canada, Europe, Russia, Japan, Korea, Mexico, South America, Australia, and New Zealand. He was the first American to conduct Alban Berg's Wozzeck and Lulu, and Hindemith's Cardillac. Craft also led the world premieres of Stravinsky's later, dodecaphonic works: Vom Himmel hoch, Agon, The Flood, Abraham and Isaac, Variations, Introitus, and Requiem Canticles.

He was a two-time recipient of the Grand Prix du Disque, as well as the Edison Prize for his recordings of music by Varèse and Stravinsky. His recordings of the music of Stravinsky with the Orchestra of St. Luke's were originally available on eleven now out-of-print releases from MusicMasters and seven volumes from Koch. Since early 2005, these recordings have been gradually re-released by Naxos Records.

Legacy

Craft remained in a vanguard position in relation to 20th-century art music throughout his life as a conductor and musicologist. Besides working closely with one of the greats from the 20th century, Craft produced volumes of academic and personal writings on Stravinsky and on many other musicians and composers.

In 2002, Robert Craft was awarded the International Prix du Disque at the Cannes Music Festival.

Publications

  • Prejudices in Disguise (New York, 1974)
  • Stravinsky in Pictures and Documents (with Vera Stravinsky; New York, 1978)
  • Current Convictions: Views and Reviews (New York, 1977)
  • Present Perspectives (New York, 1984)
  • Stravinsky: Glimpses of a Life (New York, 1992)
  • Stravinsky: Chronicle of a Friendship (Nashville, 1994)
  • Down a Path of Wonder (Norfolk, UK, 2006)

Craft also translated and edited Stravinsky, Selected Correspondence (3 vols., New York, 1982, 1984, 1985).

References

  1. ^ Schiff, David (13 March 2005). "Music; Still Turning Provocations Into Classics". The New York Times. Retrieved 2 February 2011.
  2. ^ "Robert Lawson Craft – Obituary", Sun-Sentinel, November 13, 2015
  3. ^ "Robert Craft, Stravinsky Adviser and Steward, Dies at 92" by Margalit Fox, The New York Times 14 November 2015

Literature

  • Craft, Robert. 2002. An Improbable Life: Memoirs. Nashville: Vanderbilt University Press. ISBN 0-8265-1381-6.
  • Craft, Robert. 2013. Stravinsky: Discoveries and Memories. Naxos Books. ISBN 978-1-843797-53-1

External links

Agon (ballet)

Agon (1957) is a ballet for twelve dancers, with music by Igor Stravinsky and choreography by George Balanchine. Composition began in December 1953 but was interrupted the next year; work was resumed in 1956 and concluded on April 27, 1957; the music was first performed on June 17, 1957, in Los Angeles conducted by Robert Craft, while the first stage performance was given by the New York City Ballet on December 1, 1957, at the City Center of Music and Drama, New York (White 1979, 490). The composition's long gestation period covers an interesting juncture in Stravinsky's composing career, in which he moved from a diatonic musical language to one based on twelve-tone technique; the music of the ballet thus demonstrates a unique symbiosis of musical idioms. The ballet has no story, but consists of a series of dance movements in which various groups of dancers interact in pairs, trios, quartets, etc. A number of the movements are based on 17th-century French court dances – saraband, galliard and bransle. It was danced as part of City Ballet's 1982 Stravinsky Centennial Celebration.

Babel (Stravinsky)

Babel is a neoclassical religious cantata composed by Igor Stravinsky in 1944.

Bethany Beardslee

Bethany Beardslee (born December 25, 1925) is an American soprano particularly noted for her collaborations with major 20th-century composers, such as Igor Stravinsky, Milton Babbitt, Pierre Boulez, George Perle, Sir Peter Maxwell Davies and her performances of great contemporary classical music by Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg, Anton Webern. Her legacy amongst midcentury composers was as a "composer's singer"—for her commitment to the highest art of new music. Milton Babbitt said of her "She manages to learn music no one else in the world can. She can work, work, work." In a 1961 interview for Newsweek, Beardslee flaunted her unflinching repertoire and disdain for commercialism: "I don't think in terms of the public... Music is for the musicians. If the public wants to come along and study it, fine. I don't go and try to tell a scientist his business because I don't know anything about it. Music is just the same way. Music is not entertainment."

Bluebird Pas de Deux (Stravinsky)

Bluebird Pas de Deux is a 1941 arrangement for chamber orchestra of a short section of Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky's The Sleeping Beauty composed by Igor Stravinsky. It was used in Lucia Chase's Bluebird ballet.

Columbia Symphony Orchestra

The Columbia Symphony Orchestra was an orchestra formed by Columbia Records strictly for the purpose of making recordings. It provided a vehicle for some of Columbia's better known conductors and recording artists to record using only company resources. The musicians in the orchestra were contracted as needed for individual sessions and consisted of free-lance artists and members of either the New York Philharmonic or the Los Angeles Philharmonic, depending on whether the recording was being made in Columbia's East Coast or West Coast studios.

Craft (surname)

Craft is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Aaron Craft (born 1991), American basketball player

Charles Craft (1902–1968), English-born American film and television editor

Chris Craft (racing driver), British motor racing driver

Christine Craft (born 1944), American radio talk show host and former television anchorperson

Donnie Craft (born 1959), American football player

Ellen Craft (c. 1826–c. 1891), slave from Macon, Georgia, whose escape was widely publicized

Jason Craft, American professional football cornerback

Juanita Craft (1902–1985), American civil rights pioneer

Kinuko Y. Craft (born 1940), American artist

Marcella Craft (1874–1959), American soprano

Melanie Craft (born 1969), American romance novelist

Nikki Craft (born 1949), American political activist

Paul Craft (1938–2014), American singer-songwriter

Percy Robert Craft (1856–1934), British painter associated with the Newlyn School of painters

Robert Craft (1923–2015), American conductor and writer on music

Russ Craft (1919–2009), American professional football defensive back

Shanice Craft (born 1993), German athlete

Shelley Craft (born 1976), Australian television personality

Shirley Craft (1927–2010), American politician and educator

Tom Craft (born 1953), American football coach

Die Jakobsleiter

Die Jakobsleiter (Jacob's Ladder) is an oratorio by Arnold Schoenberg that marks his transition from a contextual or free atonality to the twelve-tone technique anticipated in the oratorio's use of hexachords. Though ultimately unfinished by Schoenberg the piece was prepared for performance by Schoenberg student Winfried Zillig at the request of Gertrude Schoenberg.

Schoenberg began the libretto in 1914-15, published it in 1917, and began the music in 1915, finishing most of his work on it in 1926, and finished a small amount of orchestration in 1944, leaving 700 measures at his death.The piece is also notable for its use of developing variation.

The fragment received a partial premiere - 160 bars - in 1958, and was premiered as far as possible in Vienna on June 16, 1961, conducted by Rafael Kubelik. All performances before 1968 were concert performances; the American premiere took place in 1968 at the Santa Fe Opera using a staging by director Bodo Igesz. It was repeated in 1980. In 1968 a "scenic performance" - the oratorio version of what for opera would be a staged performance - was given. The score was first published in 1974 by the composer's publisher Belmont.Notable recordings include one on Columbia records, Robert Craft conducting and one with Siegmund Nimsgern as Gabriel, and with Ian Partridge, Anthony Rolfe Johnson and Mady Mesplé in other singing parts, conducted by Pierre Boulez, for CBS released in 1982.

Ebony Concerto (Stravinsky)

Igor Stravinsky wrote the Ebony Concerto in 1945 (finishing the score on December 1) for the Woody Herman band known as the First Herd. It is one in a series of compositions commissioned by the bandleader/clarinetist featuring solo clarinet, and the score is dedicated to him. It was first performed on March 25, 1946 in Carnegie Hall in New York City, by Woody Herman's Band, conducted by Walter Hendl.

Igor Stravinsky

Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky (; Russian: И́горь Фёдорович Страви́нский, IPA: [ˈiɡərʲ ˈfʲɵdərəvʲɪtɕ strɐˈvʲinskʲɪj]; 17 June [O.S. 5 June] 1882 – 6 April 1971) was a Russian-born composer, pianist, and conductor. He is widely considered one of the most important and influential composers of the 20th century.

Stravinsky's compositional career was notable for its stylistic diversity. He first achieved international fame with three ballets commissioned by the impresario Serge Diaghilev and first performed in Paris by Diaghilev's Ballets Russes: The Firebird (1910), Petrushka (1911), and The Rite of Spring (1913). The last of these transformed the way in which subsequent composers thought about rhythmic structure and was largely responsible for Stravinsky's enduring reputation as a musical revolutionary who pushed the boundaries of musical design. His "Russian phase" which continued with works such as Renard, the Soldier's Tale and Les Noces, was followed in the 1920s by a period in which he turned to neoclassical music. The works from this period tended to make use of traditional musical forms (concerto grosso, fugue and symphony), drawing on earlier styles, especially from the 18th century. In the 1950s, Stravinsky adopted serial procedures. His compositions of this period shared traits with examples of his earlier output: rhythmic energy, the construction of extended melodic ideas out of a few two- or three-note cells and clarity of form, and of instrumentation.

Igor Stravinsky discography

This is a listing of all of Igor Stravinsky's commercially released studio recordings as a conductor or as a pianist; it also includes recordings conducted by Robert Craft "under the supervision of the composer." Works are arranged in chronological order by date of composition.

Symphony in E-flat

Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (May 2, 1966 – Hollywood)The Faun and the Shepherdess

Mary Simmons (m-s); CBC Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (May 7–8, 1964 – Toronto)Pastorale

Samuel Dushkin (vn); Gromer (ob); Durand (Eng hn); Vacelier (cl); Grandmaison (bsn); Igor Stravinsky (Jun. 6, 1933 – Paris)

Joseph Szigeti (vn); Mitchell Miller (ob); R. McGinnis (cl); D. Gassman (Eng hn); Sol Schoenbach (bsn); Igor Stravinsky (Feb. 9, 1946 – New York)

Israel Baker (vn); Columbia Chamber Ensemble; Igor Stravinsky (Oct. 26, 1965 – Hollywood)Scherzo fantastique

CBC Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Dec. 1, 1962 – Toronto)Feu d'artifice (Fireworks)

Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra of New York; Igor Stravinsky (Jan. 28, 1946 – New York)

Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Dec. 17, 1963 – New York)The Firebird

Walther Straram Concerts Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (1919 suite, Nov. 8–10, 1928, Theatre des Champs Elysees – Paris)

Samuel Dushkin (vn); Igor Stravinsky (pn) (Scherzo & Berceuse, Jun. 6–8, 1933 – Paris)

Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra of New York; Igor Stravinsky (1945 suite without connecting interludes, Jan. 28, 1946 – New York)

Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (complete ballet, Jan. 23–25, 1961 – Hollywood)

Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (1945 suite, Jan. 18, 1967 ≠ Hollywood)Two Poems of Verlaine

Donald Gramm (b); Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Dec. 11, 1964; Sept. 26, 1966 – New York)Petrushka

[The Symphony Orchestra]; Igor Stravinsky (abridged original version, Jun. 27–28, 1928 – London)

Samuel Dushkin (vn); Igor Stravinsky (pn) (Danse russe, Jun. 6–8, 1933 – Paris)

Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra of New York; Igor Stravinsky (suite from the 1911 version, Apr. 29, 1940 – New York)

Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (1946 revised orchestration of the complete ballet, Feb. 12, 15, 17, 1960 – Hollywood)Two Poems of Balmont

Marni Nixon (s); Arthur Gleghorn, A. Hoberman (fl); Hugo Raimondi, Lloyd Ulyate (cl); Israel Baker, D. Albert (vn); Cecil Figelski (va); Howard Colf (vc) ; Igor Stravinsky (July 28, 1955 – Hollywood)

Evelyn Lear (s); Louise di Tullio, Sheridan Stokes (fl); Hugo Raimonde & John Neufeld (cl); Israel Baker & Harold Dicterow (vn); Robert Craft (Jan. 24, 1967 – Hollywood)Le roi des étoiles (Zvezdoliki)

Festival Singers of Toronto; CBC Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Nov. 29, 1962 – Toronto)The Rite of Spring

Walther Straram Concerts Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (1928 – Paris)

Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra of New York; Igor Stravinsky (Apr. 29, 1940 – New York)

Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (with 1943 revised Danse sacrale, Jan. 5–6, 1960 – New York)Three Japanese Lyrics

Marni Nixon (s); Arthur Gleghorn, A. Hoberman (fl); Hugo Raimondi, Lloyd Ulyate (cl); Israel Baker, D. Albert (vn); Cecil Figelski (va); Howard Colf (vc) ; Igor Stravinsky (July 28, 1955 – Hollywood)

Evelyn Lear (s); Louise di Tullio, Sheridan Stokes (fl); Hugo Raimonde, John Neufeld (cl); Israel Baker, Harold Dicterow (vn); Robert Craft (Jun. 10, 1968 – Hollywood)Three Little Songs

Marilyn Horne (m-s); [chamber orchestra]; Igor Stravinsky (July 28, 1955 – Hollywood)

Cathy Berberian (m-s); Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Dec. 11, 1964 – New York)The Nightingale

Samuel Dushkin (vn); Igor Stravinsky (pn) (The Nightingale & Chinese March, Jun. 6–8, 1933 – Paris)

Reri Grist, Marina Picassi (s); Elaine Bonazzi (a); Loren Driscoll, Stanley Kolk, Carl Kaiser (t); Kenneth Smith, Herbert Beattie, Donald Gramm, W. Murphy (b); Chorus & Orchestra of the Opera Society of Washington; Igor Stravinsky (Dec. 29, 31, 1960 – Washington D.C.)

Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Robert Craft (Song of the Nightingale, Jan. 23, 1967 – Hollywood)Pribaoutki

Cathy Berberian (m-s); Columbia Chamber Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Dec. 11, 1964 – New York)Berceuses du chat

Cathy Berberian (m-s); Paul E. Howland, Jack Kreiselman & Charles Russo (cl) ; Igor Stravinsky (Dec. 14, 1964 – New York)Renard

George Shirley, Loren Driscoll (t); William Murphy (bar); Donald Gramm (b); Toni Koves (cimb); Columbia Chamber Ensemble; Igor Stravinsky (Jan. 26, 1962 – New York)Four Russian Peasant Songs

Marni Nixon (s); Marilynn Horne (s); [female choir]; James Decker, Sinclair Lott, George Hyde, H. Markowitz (hn); Igor Stravinsky (July 28, 1955 – Hollywood)

Gregg Smith Singers; Columbia Symphony members; Igor Stravinsky (Aug. 20, 1965 – Hollywood)Les noces

Kate Winter (s); Linda Seymour (m-s); Parry Jones (t); Roy Henderson (b); [chorus & ensemble]; Igor Stravinsky (Jun. 1934 – London)

Mildred Allen (s); Regina Sarfaty (m-s); Loren Driscoll (t); Robert Oliver (b); American Concert Choir; Samuel Barber, Aaron Copland, Lukas Foss, Roger Sessions (pn); Columbia Percussion Ensemble; Igor Stravinsky (Dec. 21, 1959 – New York)

Mildred Allen (s); Adrienne Albert (m-s); Jack Litten (t); William Metcalf (b); Gregg Smith Singers; Ithaca College Concert Choir; Columbia Percussion Ensemble; Robert Craft (Dec 21, 1965 – New York)L'Histoire du soldat

Darrieux (vn); Boussagol (cbs); Godeau (cl); Dherin (bsn); Foveau (tpt); Delbos (tbn); Jean Paul Morel (perc); Igor Stravinsky (1932 – Paris)

Alexander Schneider (vn); Julius Levine (cbs); David Oppenheim (cl); Loren Glickman (bsn); Robert Nagel (tpt); Erwin Price (tbn); Alfred Howard (perc); Igor Stravinsky (Jan. 27, 1954 – New York)

Israel Baker (vn); Richard Kelley (cbs); Roy D'Antonio (cl); Don Christlieb (bsn); Charles Brady (tpt); Robert Marsteller (tbn); William Kraft (perc); Igor Stravinsky (Feb. 10 & 13, 1961 – Hollywood)Ragtime

[chamber ensemble]; Igor Stravinsky (c. 1934 – Paris)

Toni Koves (cimbalom); Columbia Chamber Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Jan. 26, 1962 – New York)Piano-Rag Music

Igor Stravinsky (pn) (c. 1934 – Paris)Pulcinella

[orchestra] ; Igor Stravinsky (Nos. 5–8 of concert suite, 1927/32 – Paris)

Samuel Dushkin (vn); Igor Stravinsky (pn) (Suite Italienne Nos. 2 & 5, Jun. 6–8, 1933 – Paris)

Mary Simmons (s); Glenn Schnittke (t); Phillip MacGregor (bs); Cleveland Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Dec. 14, 1953 – Cleveland)

Irene Jordan (s); George Shirley (t); Donald Gramm (bs); Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Aug. 23, 1965 – Hollywood)

Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (concert suite, Aug. 25, 1965 – Hollywood)Concertino for 12 Instruments

Columbia Chamber Ensemble; Igor Stravinsky (Oct. 26, 1965 – Hollywood)Symphonies of Wind Instruments

Wind ensemble of Cologne Radio Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Oct. 7, 1951 – Cologne)

Columbia Symphony Winds and Brass; Robert Craft (Oct. 11, 1966 – New York)Suites Nos. 1 & 2 for Small Orchestra

CBC Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Mar. 29–30, 1963 – Toronto)Mavra

Joseph Szigeti (vn); Igor Stravinsky (pn) (Parasha's Song, May 9, 1946 – New York)

Susan Belink (s); Mary Simmons (m-s); Patricia Rideout (a); Stanley Kolk (t); CBC Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (May 7–8, 1964 – Toronto)Octet for wind instruments

Marcel Moyse (fl); Godeau (cl); Dherin & Piard (bsn); Foveau, Vignal (tpt); Lafosse, Delbos (tbn) ; Igor Stravinsky (1932 – Paris)

Julius Baker (fl); David Oppenheim (cl); Loren Glickman, Sylvia Deutscher (bsn); Robert Nagel, Ted Weis (tpt); Erwin Price, Richard Hixon (tbn) ; Igor Stravinsky (Jan. 26, 1954 – New York)

James Pellerite (fl); David Oppenheim (cl); Loren Glickman, Arthur Weisberg (bsn); Robert Nagel, Ted Weis (tpt); Keith Brown, Richard Hixon (tbn) ; Igor Stravinsky (Jan. 5, 1961 – New York)Concerto for Piano and Wind Instruments

Soulima Stravinsky (pn); RCA Victor Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (1949 – New York)

Philippe Entremont (pn); Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (May 13, 1964 – New York)Serenade in A

Igor Stravinsky (pn) (c. 1934 – Paris)Pater Noster

Choir of the Church of the Blessed Sacrament; Igor Stravinsky (Apr. 1949 – New York)

Festival Singers of Toronto; Igor Stravinsky (Slavonic version, May 7–8, 1964 – Toronto)Oedipus Rex

Werner Hessenland (nar); Jean Cocteau (nar - Columbia ed.); Martha Mödl (m-s); Peter Pears, Helmut Krebs (t); Heinz Rehfuss (bar); Otto von Rohr (b); Cologne Radio Symphony Chorus and Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Oct. 7, 1951 – Cologne)

John Westbrook (nar); Shirley Verrett (m-s); George Shirley, Loren Driscoll (t); John Reardon (bar); Donald Gramm, Chester Watson (b); Chorus and Orchestra of the Opera Society of Washington; Igor Stravinsky (Jan. 20, 1961 – Washington D.C.)Apollo

RCA Victor Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (1950 – New York)

Cologne Radio Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Oct. 7, 1951 – Cologne)

Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Jan. 29, Dec. 11, 1964 – New York)The Fairy’s Kiss

Victor Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Divertimento, 1940 – Mexico City)

RCA Victor Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Divertimento, 1947 – Hollywood)

Cleveland Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Dec. 11, 1955 – Cleveland)

Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Aug. 19-20, 1965 – Hollywood)Four Etudes for Orchestra

CBC Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Nov. 29, Dec. 1, 1962 – Toronto)Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra

Igor Stravinsky (pn); Straram Orchestra; Ernest Ansermet (May 8–10, 1930 – Paris)

Philippe Entremont (pn); Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Robert Craft (Jan. 3, 1966 – New York)Symphony of Psalms

Alexei Vlassoff Choir; [symphony orchestra]; Igor Stravinsky (Feb. 1931 – Paris)

Columbia Broadcasting Symphony Orchestra & Chorus; Igor Stravinsky (Dec. 19, 1946)

Festival Singers of Toronto; CBC Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Mar. 30, 1963)Concerto in D for Violin and Orchestra

Samuel Dushkin (vn); Lamoureux Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (1932 – Paris)

Isaac Stern (vn); Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Jun. 29-30, 1960 – Hollywood)Duo Concertant

Samuel Dushkin (vn); Igor Stravinsky (pn) (1933 – Paris)

Joseph Szigeti (vn); Igor Stravinsky (pn) (Oct. 11, 13, 1945 – New York)Credo

Gregg Smith Singers; Igor Stravinsky (Slavonic version, Aug. 20, 1965 – Hollywood)Perséphone

Vera Zorina (nar); Richard Robinson (t); Westminster Choir; New York Philharmonic; Igor Stravinsky (Jan. 14, 1957)

Vera Zorina (nar); Michele Molese (t); Gregg Smith Singers; Texas Boys Choir; Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (May 4, 7, 1966 – Hollywood)Ave Maria

Choir of the Church of the Blessed Sacrament; Igor Stravinsky (Apr. 1949 – New York)

Festival Singers of Toronto; Igor Stravinsky (Slavonic version, May 7–8, 1964 – Toronto)Concerto for Two Pianos

Igor Stravinsky (pn); Soulima Stravinsky (pn) (1938 – Paris; a recording of Mozart's Fugue in C minor, K.426 was made at the same sessions)Jeu de cartes

Berlin Philharmonic; Igor Stravinsky (1938 – Berlin)

Cleveland Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Mar. 13, 1964 – Cleveland)Preludium

Columbia Jazz Ensemble; Igor Stravinsky (Apr. 27, 1965 – New York)Concerto in E-flat “Dumbarton Oaks”

Dumbarton Oaks Festival Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (May 28, 1947)

Columbia Symphony Orchestra members; Igor Stravinsky (Mar. 29, 1964 – Hollywood)Symphony in C

Cleveland Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Dec. 14, 1952 – Cleveland)

CBC Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Dec. 2-3, 1962 – Toronto)Tango

Columbia Jazz Ensemble; Igor Stravinsky (Apr. 27, 1965)The Star-Spangled Banner (arrangement)

CBC Symphony Orchestra; Toronto Festival Singers; Igor Stravinsky (May 8, 1964 – Toronto)Danses concertantes

RCA Victor Chamber Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (1947 – Hollywood)

Columbia Chamber Orchestra; Robert Craft (Jan. 20, 1967 – Hollywood)Circus Polka

Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra of New York; Igor Stravinsky (Feb. 5, 1945 – New York)

CBC Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Mar. 29, 1963 – Toronto)Four Norwegian Moods

Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra of New York; Igor Stravinsky (Feb. 5, 1945 – New York)

CBC Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Mar. 29, 1963 – Toronto)Ode

Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra of New York; Igor Stravinsky (Feb. 5, 1945 – New York)

Cleveland Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Mar. 13, 1964 – Cleveland)Babel

John Colicos (nar); Festival Singers of Toronto; CBC Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Nov. 29, 1963 – Toronto)Scherzo à la russe

RCA Victor Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (1947 – Hollywood)

Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Dec. 17, 1963 – New York)Scènes de ballet

Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra of New York; Igor Stravinsky (Feb. 5, 1945 – New York)

CBC Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Mar. 28, 1963 – Toronto)Symphony in Three Movements

Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra of New York; Igor Stravinsky (Jan. 28, 1946 – New York)

Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Feb. 1, 1961 – Hollywood)Ebony Concerto

Woody Herman (cl); and his Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Aug. 19, 1946 – Hollywood)

Benny Goodman, Charles Russo, 2nd movement (cl); Columbia Jazz Ensemble; Igor Stravinsky (Apr. 27, 1965 – New York)Concerto in D “Basle”

RCA Victor Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (1949 – New York)

Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Dec. 17, 1963 – New York)Orpheus

RCA Victor Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Feb. 1949 – New York)

Chicago Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (July 20, 1964 – Chicago)Mass

Choir of the Church of the Blessed Sacrament; [wind ensemble]; Igor Stravinsky (Apr. 1949 – New York)

Gregg Smith Singers; Columbia Symphony Winds & Brass; Igor Stravinsky (Jun. 9, 1960 – Hollywood)The Rake’s Progress

Hilde Gueden (s, Anne Truelove); Martha Lipton (m-s, Mother Goose); Blanche Thebom (m-s, Baba the Turk); Eugene Conley (t, Tom Rakewell); Paul Ranke (t, Sellem); Mack Harrell (bar, Nick Shadow); Norman Scott (b, Truelove); Lawrence Davidson (b, Keeper); Chorus & Orchestra of the Metropolitan Opera Association; Igor Stravinsky (Mar. 1, 8, 10, 1953 – New York)

Judith Raskin (s, Anne Truelove); Jean Manning (m-s, Mother Goose); Regina Sarfaty (m-s, Baba the Turk); Alexander Young (t, Tom Rakewell); Kevin Miller (t, Sellem); John Reardon (bar, Nick Shadow); Don Garrard (b, Truelove); Peter Tracey (b, Keeper); Sadler’s Wells Opera Chorus; Royal Philharmonic Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Jun. 16-20, 22, 23, 1964 – London)Cantata

Jennie Tourel (m-s); Hugues Cuenod (t); New York Concert Choir; Philharmonic Chamber Ensemble; Igor Stravinsky (Dec. 22, 1952 – New York)

Adrienne Albert (m-s); Alexander Young (t); Gregg Smith Singers; Columbia Chamber Ensemble; Igor Stravinsky (Nov. 27, 1965 – Hollywood)Septet

David Oppenheim (cl); Loren Glickman (bsn); John Barrows (hn); Alexander Schneider (vn); Karin Tuttle (va); Bernard Greenhouse (vc); Ralph Kirkpatrick (pn); Igor Stravinsky (Jan. 27, 1954 – Hollywood)

Columbia Chamber Ensemble; Igor Stravinsky (Oct. 27, 1965 – Hollywood)Three Songs from Shakespeare

Grace-Lynn Martin (s); Arthur Gleghorn (fl); Hugo Raimondi (cl); Cecil Figelski (va); Igor Stravinsky (Sept. 13, 1954 – Hollywood)

Cathy Berberian (m-s); Columbia Chamber Ensemble; Igor Stravinsky (Dec. 14, 1964 – New York)Four Russian Songs (arr. for voice, flute, harp and guitar)

Marni Nixon (s); Arthur Gleghorn (fl); Dorothy Remsen (h); Jack Marshall (g); Igor Stravinsky (July 28, 1955 – Hollywood)

Adrienne Albert (m-s); Louise de Tullio (fl); Dorothy Remsen (h); Laurindo Almeida (g); Igor Stravinsky (Nov. 30, 1965 – Hollywood)In Memoriam Dylan Thomas

Richard Robinson (t); Lloyd Ulyate, Hoyt Bohannon, Francis Howard, Seymour Zeldin (tbn); Israel Baker, Sol Babitz (vn); Cecil Figelski (va); George Neikrug (vc); Igor Stravinsky (Sept. 13, 1954 – Hollywood)

Alexander Young (t); Columbia Chamber Ensemble; Igor Stravinsky (Nov. 27, 1965 – Hollywood)Greeting Prelude

Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Dec. 17, 1963 – New York)Canticum Sacrum

Richard Robinson (t); Howard Chitjian (bar); Los Angeles Festival Choir & Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Jun. 19, 1957 – Los Angeles)Agon

Los Angeles Festival Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Jun. 18, 1957 – Los Angeles)Threni

Bethany Beardslee (s); Beatrice Krebs (a); William Lewis, James Wainner (t); Mac Morgan (bar); Robert Oliver (b); Schola Cantorum; Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Jan. 5-6, 1959 – New York)Movements for Piano and Orchestra

Charles Rosen (pn); Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Feb. 12, 1961 – Hollywood)Epitaphium

Arthur Gleghorn (fl); Kalman Bloch (cl); Dorothy Remsen (h); Robert Craft (Dec. 14, 1964 – New York)Double Canon

Israel Baker, Otis Igleman (vn); Sanford Schonbach (va); George Neikrug (vc); Robert Craft (Jan. 25, 1961 – Hollywood)A Sermon, a Narrative and a Prayer

John Horton (nar); Shirley Verrett (m-s); Loren Driscoll (t); Festival Singers of Toronto; CBC Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Apr. 29, 1962 – Toronto)Anthem: The dove descending breaks the air

Festival Singers of Toronto; Igor Stravinsky (Apr. 29, 1962 – Toronto)8 Instrumental Miniatures

CBC Symphony Orchestra; Igor Stravinsky (Apr. 29, 1962 – Toronto)The Flood

Laurence Harvey (nar); Sebastian Cabot, Elsa Lanchester, Paul Tripp (actors); Richard Robinson (t); John Reardon, Robert Oliver (b); Columbia Symphony Chorus & Orchestra; Robert Craft (Mar. 28, 31, 1962 – Hollywood)Elegy for J.F.K.

Cathy Berberian (m-s); Paul Howland, Jack Kreiselman, Charles Russo (cl); Igor Stravinsky (Dec. 14, 1964 – New York)Fanfare for a New Theatre

Robert Heinrich, Robert E. Nagel (tpt); Igor Stravinsky (Dec. 11, 1964 – New York)Abraham and Isaac

Richard Frisch (bar); Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Robert Craft (Jan. 24, 1967; July 11, 1969 – Hollywood)Variations: Aldous Huxley in memoriam

Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Robert Craft (Oct. 11, 1966 – Hollywood)Introitus

Gregg Smith Singers; Columbia Chamber Ensemble; Igor Stravinsky (Feb. 9, 1966 – New York)Requiem Canticles

Soloists; Ithaca College Concert Choir; Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Robert Craft (Oct. 11, 1966 – New York)The Owl and the Pussycat

Adrienne Albert (m-s); Robert Craft (pn) (Aug. 18, 1967 – Hollywood)

Le roi des étoiles

Le roi des étoiles (The King of the Stars; Russian: Звездоликий, translit. Zvezdolikiy) is a cantata by Igor Stravinsky, composed in 1911–12. It is set to a text by the Russian poet Konstantin Balmont and published in 1913 by P. Jurgenson. The original Russian title literally means "Star-face" or "The Star-Faced One". The work is more commonly known by the French title as translated by Michel-Dimitri Calvocoressi.

The work is very rarely performed, primarily because it is written for an unusually large orchestra — quadruple woodwind, eight horns, three trumpets, three trombones, tuba, timpani, bass drum, tam-tam (the entire percussion section only plays in one measure), two harps, celesta, and heavily divided strings—plus six-part men's chorus — and because it lasts barely five minutes and encompasses just 54 measures. Claude Debussy, to whom the work is dedicated, praised the work in a 1913 letter to the composer; though describing it as "extraordinary", he doubted that it would soon find an audience, given its complexities and its short duration. Le roi des étoiles was not performed in public until 1939. On 19 April of that year, in Brussels, Belgium, the conductor Franz André led the Orchestra of Radio Brussels.

The published score does not address a significant question: whether or not the chorus is to sing the chords that set the four syllables of the Russian title and that appear separately at the top of the first page. The recordings conducted by Michael Tilson Thomas on Deutsche Grammophon (Boston Symphony Orchestra and the New England Conservatory Chorus, 1972), Riccardo Chailly on Decca/London (Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra and Chorus, 1984), Robert Craft on Music Masters Classics (Orchestra of St. Luke's and the Gregg Smith Singers, 1995), and Pierre Boulez on Deutsche Grammophon (Cleveland Orchestra and Chorus, 1996) all include them.

List of music directors of the Ojai Music Festival

This is a complete list of music directors of the Ojai Music Festival, an American festival of classical music held annually in Ojai, California. The list is shown both alphabetically and chronologically.

Mass (Stravinsky)

Igor Stravinsky composed his Mass between 1944 and 1948. This 19-minute setting of the Roman Catholic Mass exhibits the austere, Neoclassic, anti-Romantic aesthetic that characterizes his work from about 1923 to 1951. The Mass also represents one of only a handful of extant pieces by Stravinsky that was not commissioned. As such, part of the motivation behind its composition has been cited by Robert Craft and others as the product of a spiritual necessity.

Merzzow

Merzzow is an album by the Japanese noise musician Merzbow. The album "combines animal concepts and deconstructions of 20th-century music, ambient drones and a deep grinding groove". The title is a pun on Merzbow and the Japanese word zō (象, elephant).

The cover photos were taken at Tsukiji Hongan-ji. "Elephant Song" features a guitar loop that resembled the Japanese children song "Zō-san", hence the title of the album. "Music Machine" samples the song of the same name by Jane. "Humming Bird" had been released as a single, it samples "Three Little Orchestra Pieces" by Arnold Schoenberg (conducted by Robert Craft).

Noah and the Flood (ballet)

Noah and the Flood is a ballet choreogreaphed by George Balanchine, co-founder and balletmaster of the New York City Ballet, and Jacques d'Amboise to Stravinsky's The Flood (1962). The premiere took place June 11, 1982, at the New York State Theater, Lincoln Center. The text was chosen and arranged by Robert Craft from Genesis, the Te Deum and Sanctus hymns, and the 15th century York and Chester miracle plays.

Nocturnal (Varèse)

Nocturnal (1961) for soprano, male choir, and orchestra, is a musical composition by Edgard Varèse with text consisting of syllables by Varèse and words and phrases adapted from House of Incest by Anaïs Nin (1936), revised and completed posthumously by Chou Wen-chung (1968), The piece is commissioned by and dedicated to the Koussevitzky Music Foundation, published 1972. It includes music for flexatone and two ondes Martenots. The use of Dada-like "meta-language" in Ecuatorial and in Nocturnal was suggested by Antonin Artaud. The premier was conducted by Robert Craft at The Town Hall in New York on May 1, 1961.

The Flood (Stravinsky)

The Flood: A musical play (1962) is a short biblical drama by Igor Stravinsky on the allegory of Noah, originally written as a work for television. It contains singing, spoken dialogue, and ballet sequences. It is in Stravinsky's late, serial style.

The work was premiered in the United States on the CBS Television Network on 14 June 1962, a production conducted by Robert Craft and choreographed by George Balanchine. Dramatic actors participating in the work included Laurence Harvey (Narrator), Sebastian Cabot (Noah), and Elsa Lanchester (Noah's Wife, which Lanchester played with a Cockney accent). Robert Craft also conducted the first staged performance, in Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1962, and again in Hamburg on 30 April 1963.

Threni (Stravinsky)

Threni: id est Lamentationes Jeremiae Prophetae, usually referred to simply as Threni, is a musical setting by Igor Stravinsky of verses from the Book of Lamentations in the Latin of the Vulgate, for solo singers, chorus and orchestra. It is important among Stravinsky's compositions as his first and longest completely dodecaphonic work, but is not often performed. It has been described as "austere" but also as a "culminating point" in his career as an artist, "important both spiritually and stylistically" and "the most ambitious and structurally the most complex" of all his religious compositions, and even "among Stravinsky's greatest works".Stravinsky composed Threni in 1957–1958 for the Venice Biennale, and it was first performed there in September 1958. A performance in Paris two months later was a disaster, attributed to inadequate performers and insufficient rehearsals. It led to mutual recriminations between Stravinsky, Pierre Boulez and Robert Craft. The work was first published in 1958 and first recorded in 1959, in a recording conducted by the composer.

As Threni was intended for concert rather than liturgical use, Stravinsky chose the text freely from the early chapters of the Book of Lamentations. It has three movements: the large central movement is surrounded by two much shorter ones. Ernst Krenek composed a setting of the Lamentations in 1942, and Stravinsky acknowledged that it might have influenced him. He considered it less likely that works by Renaissance composers, including Tallis, Byrd and Palestrina, had influenced him, although he had studied such music.

Vera de Bosset

Vera de Bosset Stravinsky (January 7, 1889 – September 17, 1982) was a Russian-born American dancer and artist. She is better known as the mistress and, ultimately, second wife of the Russian composer Igor Stravinsky, who married her in 1940.

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