Robert Casciola

Robert F. Casciola (born c. 1935) is an American former college football coach, National Basketball Association executive, banking executive, and broadcaster. He was the head coach at the University of Connecticut from 1971 to 1972 and at Princeton University from 1973 to 1977. He held assistant coaching positions at Princeton, Dartmouth College. Casciola served as an executive vice president and the chief operating officer for the New Jersey Nets of the NBA from 1987 to 1991. He joined the National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame in 1991 as executive director. He became president in 1996, serving in the role until his retirement in 2005. He played college football at Princeton as a tackle.

Robert Casciola
Biographical details
Bornc. 1935
Playing career
1955–1957Princeton
Position(s)Tackle
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1958–1960Princeton (freshmen)
1961–1965Princeton (assistant)
1966–1968Dartmouth (DE/LB)
1969–1970Connecticut (def. assistant)
1971–1972Connecticut
1973–1977Princeton
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1987–1991New Jersey Nets (EVP/COO)
Head coaching record
Overall23–38–2
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 Yankee (1971)

Early life

A native of New Hyde Park, New York,[1] Casciola attended Mineola High School in Garden City Park.[2] He attended college at Princeton University, where he played on the football team from 1955 to 1957.[3] He was named to the All-Ivy League team in 1957.[4] He graduated in 1958.[3]

Coaching career

After graduation, Casciola spent three years as the freshmen coach at his alma mater.[1] He then joined the Princeton varsity coaching staff, where remained through the 1965 season.[1][5] Casciola also served as an officer in the United States Army and attained the rank of captain before being discharged in 1965.[1] From 1966 to 1968, he spent three years mentoring the defensive ends and linebackers at Dartmouth under head coach Bob Blackman from 1966 to 1968.[6] From 1969 to 1970, he served as the defensive coach at Connecticut.[7] In December 1970, he was promoted to head coach in place of John Toner, who remained at UConn as athletic director.[7] Casciola led UConn to a 5–3–1 record in his first season and a share of the Atlantic 10 Conference championship.[8] After one additional season at UConn, he amassed a record of 9–8–1 during his tenure.[9]

In March 1973, Princeton appointed Casciola as its head coach and continued through 1977.[1][9]

After coaching

In June 1978, Casciola became the assistant vice president for government banking at the First National State Bank of New Jersey (later known as the First Fidelity Bank of New Jersey).[10] In 1979, he served as a member of the Garden State Bowl committee.[11] In 1981, he led a football camp for high school quarterbacks and wide receivers at Mercer University in Atlanta.[12] He worked as a color analyst for Princeton football broadcasts starting in 1981, and later also announced for the New Jersey Generals, Rutgers University athletics, and Ivy League athletics.[13]

In 1987, he left his position with the First Fidelity Bank of New Jersey to take over as executive vice president and chief operating officer for the New Jersey Nets of the National Basketball Association. Casciola held that post for five years.[13] In July 1991, Casciola resigned from the Nets to become the executive director of the National Football Foundation and College Football Hall of Fame.[14] Upon being chosen for The National Football Foundation's Distinguished American Award in 2004, noted Sports Artist Ted Watts added one more accolade saying, "I think your most admirable trait is to have faith and vision beyond the chalk marks of a football sideline".

Casciola has four children with his wife, Janet.[13]

Head coaching record

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Connecticut Huskies (Yankee Conference) (1971–1972)
1971 Connecticut 5–3–1 4–1–1 T–1st
1972 Connecticut 4–5 4–1 2nd
Connecticut: 9–8–1 8–2
Princeton Tigers (Ivy League) (1973–1977)
1973 Princeton 1–8 0–7 8th
1974 Princeton 4–4–1 3–4 T–5th
1975 Princeton 4–5 3–4 5th
1976 Princeton 2–7 2–5 T–5th
1977 Princeton 3–6 3–4 6th
Princeton: 14–30–1 11–24
Total: 23–38–2
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title or championship game berth

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Bob Casciola to take over Princeton's grid program, Star-News, March 2, 1972.
  2. ^ MINEOLA DEFEATS LAWRENCE, 8 TO 6; Oliver Stars in Nassau Test -- Hicksville and Mepham Elevens Also Triumph, The New York Times, September 21, 1952.
  3. ^ a b 2008 Princeton Football Media Guide, p. 134.
  4. ^ 2008 Princeton Football Media Guide, p. 104, Princeton University, 2008.
  5. ^ COACH DISCOUNTS PRINCETON 'JINX'; Donelli Gives Lions Chance to Beat Tigers Tomorrow Despite Long Drought, The New York Times, September 30, 1960.
  6. ^ UConn Defensive Team Lauded by Casciola, Hartford Courant, September 30, 1969.
  7. ^ a b Robert Casciola, Bangor Daily News, December 22, 1970.
  8. ^ Connecticut Composite Championship Listing, College Football Data Warehouse, retrieved January 17, 2011.
  9. ^ a b Robert "Bob" Casciola Records by Year, College Football Data Warehouse, retrieved January 17, 2011.
  10. ^ Princeton Football Coach Finds Slot At New Jersey Bank, The New York Times, June 20, 1978.
  11. ^ Navy's bowl hopes alive; Morgan, Towson boost playoff possibilities, The Baltimore Sun, November 12, 1979.
  12. ^ Football camp taking applications, The Tuscaloosa News, March 30, 1981.
  13. ^ a b c Robert Casciola, American Football Coaches Foundation, retrieved January 17, 2011.
  14. ^ Transactions, The New York Times, July 17, 1991.
1971 Connecticut Huskies football team

The 1971 Connecticut Huskies football team represented the University of Connecticut in the 1971 NCAA College Division football season. The Huskies were led by first year head coach Robert Casciola, and completed the season with a record of 5–3–1.

1972 Connecticut Huskies football team

The 1972 Connecticut Huskies football team represented the University of Connecticut in the 1972 NCAA College Division football season. The Huskies were led by second year head coach Robert Casciola, and completed the season with a record of 4–5.

Charlie Caldwell

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Garrett Cochran

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George H. Lamson

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Jim McCormick (American football)

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List of Connecticut Huskies head football coaches

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