Robert Brokenshire

Robert "Rob" Lawrence Brokenshire (born 1957) is a South Australian dairy farmer and former member of the South Australian Parliament.[1] He represented the Australian Conservatives party from 26 April 2017, and Family First Party before that.


Robert Brokenshire

Robert Brokenshire Portrait 2010
Member of the South Australian Legislative Council
In office
24 July 2008 – 17 March 2018
Member of the South Australian Parliament
for Mawson
In office
11 December 1993 – 18 March 2006
Preceded bySusan Lenehan
Succeeded byLeon Bignell
Personal details
Born1957 (age 61–62)
NationalityAustralian
Political party
ResidenceMount Compass, South Australia
ProfessionDairy farmer
WebsiteOfficial profile

Political career

Between 1993 and 2006, Brokenshire represented the Liberal Party as the elected member for the electoral district of Mawson in the South Australian House of Assembly (the Parliament's lower house).

On 24 July 2008, Brokenshire replaced Andrew Evans in the South Australian Legislative Council (the Parliament's upper house), representing the conservative Family First Party.

Brokenshire provides political commentary on the community radio station 88.7 Coast FM monthly on the Thursday Magazine show, presented by Dave Hearn.[2]

Liberal Party

Elected in 1993 to the seat of Mawson with the Dean Brown Liberal Party government, he was re-elected in 1997 and 2002.

In 1998, Brokenshire was promoted to cabinet in the John Olsen government. His roles included Minister for Police, Correctional Services & Emergency Services, Minister for Gambling, Minister for Volunteers, and in opposition, Shadow Minister for Health. Brokenshire served three parliamentary terms representing the Liberal Party.

After losing the seat to Labor at the 2006 election, he was denied Liberal Party pre-selection for Mawson for the next election.

Family First Party

Brokenshire contested the seat of Kingston for the Family First Party in the 2007 federal election, receiving 5.71 percent of the vote.[3][4] On 18 March 2008, he was chosen by Family First to replace Andrew Evans, who had retired from the Legislative Council,[5] and Brockenshire was sworn in on 24 July 2008.[6][7] A few years later, he expressed interest in switching to a Lower House seat,[8] but never did so.

Brokenshire frequently used Freedom of Information legislation as part of his political strategy.[9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17][18][19][20][21][22]

Brokenshire sat on various parliamentary committees, including the Public Works Committee, Select Committee on the Emergency Services Levy, Families SA Committee, Aboriginal Lands Parliamentary Standing Committee, Budget and Finance Committee, Certain Matters Relating to Horse Racing in South Australia, and Natural Resources Committee. He opposed the abolition of the Legislative Council.[23]

Brokenshire has an interest in policing,[24][25][26][27][28][29] education,[30][31] road safety,[32][33] legislation,[34] governance,[8][35][36][37][38] homelessness,[39] hospital security,[40][41] development,[8][42] accountability,[43] political advisers,[44] school projects,[45] suicide prevention,[46] food security,[47] and daylight saving.[48][49]

Australian Conservatives

In 2017, Brokenshire and Dennis Hood joined the Australian Conservatives when Family First ceased to exist.[50] He failed in his bid to be re-elected to the Legislative Council at the 2018 South Australian election.[51]

Personal life

Brokenshire's family is of Cornish descent.[52]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Profile: Hon Robert Brokenshire". Parliament of South Australia.
  2. ^ "Adelaide's Coast FM 88.7". www.coastfm.com.au. Retrieved 28 April 2016.
  3. ^ State elections: ECSA
  4. ^ Federal elections: AEC
  5. ^ Family First Press Release Archived 19 October 2007 at the Wayback Machine
  6. ^ "New MLC Robert Brokenshire puts major parties on notice". AdelaideNow. 24 July 2008. Retrieved 24 July 2008.
  7. ^ "Ex Lib back in Parliament for Family First" ABC News Online, 24 July 2008 Retrieved on 24 July 2008
  8. ^ a b c Crouch, Brad (3 April 2011). "Is Robert Brokenshire South Australia's defacto Opposition Leader?". Sunday Mail (Adelaide). Archived from the original on 8 January 2015. Retrieved 18 March 2018.
  9. ^ Miles Kemp (1 February 2011). "Violent parents endanger and disrupt schools". AdelaideNow.
  10. ^ Miles Kemp (8 July 2011). "Schools on alert to media intrusion". AdelaideNow.
  11. ^ Sharadyn Holderhead (4 July 2011). "Violent parents send fear to school". AdelaideNow.
  12. ^ David Nankervis (9 July 2011). "Bakewell Bridge speed camera labelled a 'cash cow'". AdelaideNow.
  13. ^ Miles Kemp (23 July 2010). "Council buries city danger spots". The Advertiser. Retrieved 5 August 2010.
  14. ^ Joanna Vaughan (29 June 2009). "Shame of our violent schools revealed". The Advertiser. Retrieved 5 August 2010.
  15. ^ Joanna Vaughan (2 October 2009). "Free education fees up". The Advertiser. Retrieved 5 August 2010.
  16. ^ Kemp, Miles (20 August 2009). "Schools plead for help to keep truants in class". The Advertiser. Retrieved 5 August 2010.
  17. ^ Nankervis, David (17 January 2010). "Adelaide speed cameras in 'wrong spots'". The Advertiser. Retrieved 5 August 2010.
  18. ^ Kemp, Miles (17 November 2009). "Parents of truants face $7500 fine". The Advertiser. Retrieved 5 August 2010.
  19. ^ Vaughan, Joanna (20 March 2009). "Adelaide families sleeping in cars and sheds". The Advertiser. Retrieved 5 August 2010.
  20. ^ Kemp, Miles (14 March 2009). "The PS waiting lounge waste". The Advertiser. Retrieved 5 August 2010.
  21. ^ Kemp, Miles (31 March 2009). "Adelaide nightclubs face police blitz for weapons". The Advertiser. Retrieved 5 August 2010.
  22. ^ Kemp, Miles (26 July 2010). "Bureaucrats bend truth about school offences". The Advertiser. Retrieved 5 August 2010.
  23. ^ Kelton, Greg (1 December 2008). "We must keep our democratic watchdog". The Advertiser. Retrieved 5 August 2010.
  24. ^ Robertson, Doug (8 May 2010). "Secret Police Commissioner's inquiries should be made public". The Advertiser. Retrieved 5 August 2010.
  25. ^ Miles Kemp (24 January 2011). "'Clean-up' fails to halt security guard drug use, documents show". AdelaideNow.
    Miles Kemp (24 January 2011). "'Clean-up' fails to halt security guard drug use". AdelaideNow.
  26. ^ Vaughan, Joanna (2 May 2009). "Instant jail of up to 25 years for police attackers". The Advertiser. Retrieved 5 August 2010.
  27. ^ Novak, Lauren (18 November 2009). "Parliament considers two-years jail for prison smuggling". The Advertiser. Retrieved 5 August 2010.
  28. ^ Novak, Lauren (17 February 2010). "Continuous patrols urged to cut rural road toll". The Advertiser. Retrieved 5 August 2010.
  29. ^ Candice Keller (19 January 2011). "Guards and CCTV call for schools". AdelaideNow.
  30. ^ Owen, Michael (19 January 2009). "SA Secondary Principals Association wants police in schools". The Advertiser. Retrieved 5 August 2010.
  31. ^ Candice Keller (23 November 2010). "Parents face court on truancy crackdown". AdelaideNow.
  32. ^ Robertson, Doug (7 June 2010). "Deadly curse of state's popular southern roads". The Advertiser. Retrieved 5 August 2010.
  33. ^ Julian Swallow (25 June 2011). "Have hoon-car laws misfired". AdelaideNow.
  34. ^ Sean Fewster (6 April 2011). "Call to rewrite flawed hoon laws after courts stops car crushing". AdelaideNow.
  35. ^ Daniel Wills (24 June 2011). "Rann creates post for Russell Wortley after replacing Bernie Finnigan". AdelaideNow.
  36. ^ Sarah Martin (2 June 2011). "Consumer report six months overdue". AdelaideNow.
  37. ^ "MP keen for early polls by petition". ABC. 25 July 2011.
  38. ^ Nigel Hunt (5 June 2011). "$4m to launch ICAC in Budget". AdelaideNow.
  39. ^ Miles Kemp (10 January 2011). "Housing Trust homes vacant for a month on average". AdelaideNow.
  40. ^ David Jean (20 April 2011). "Boost security to protect staff and patients, says AMA". AdelaideNow.
  41. ^ "Last ditch legal bid over Seaford Heights". Southern Times Messenger. 28 June 2011.
  42. ^ Bryan Littlely (9 October 2010). "Monsignor Cappo was aware of Parks Community Centre sale plan". AdelaideNow.
  43. ^ David Nankervis (20 March 2011). "Public servants rack up $8.5 million in damages to government cars". AdelaideNow.
  44. ^ Robert Brokenshire (1 December 2008). "We must keep our democratic watchdog". AdelaideNow.
  45. ^ David Nankervis (13 February 2011). "Schoolkids at risk as new-build defects rise". AdelaideNow.
  46. ^ "Call for suicide attention in Budget". AdelaideNow. 3 June 2011.
  47. ^ Bryan Littlely (8 June 2011). "Urban sprawl threat to food bowls". AdelaideNow.
  48. ^ Greg Kelton (10 February 2011). "Scrap longer daylight saving – MP". AdelaideNow.
  49. ^ Hon Robert Brokenshire MLC (4 March 2009). "South Australia Independent Commission Against Corruption Bill 2009". austlii.
  50. ^ "SA election: Kelly Vincent and Robert Brokenshire lose Upper House seats, 23 April 2010". Abc.net.au. Retrieved 24 April 2018.
  51. ^ Green, Antony (23 April 2018). "Final Results of the 2018 South Australian Election". Antony Green's Election Blog. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 11 May 2018.
  52. ^ White, G. Pawley, A Handbook of Cornish Surnames

Related pages

External links

1993 South Australian state election

State elections were held in South Australia on 11 December 1993. All 47 seats in the South Australian House of Assembly were up for election. The incumbent Australian Labor Party led by Premier of South Australia Lynn Arnold was defeated by the Liberal Party of Australia led by Leader of the Opposition Dean Brown. The Liberals won what is still the largest majority government in South Australian history.

2002 South Australian state election

State elections were held in South Australia on 9 February 2002. All 47 seats in the South Australian House of Assembly were up for election, along with half of the 22 seats in the South Australian Legislative Council. The incumbent Liberal Party of Australia led by Premier of South Australia Rob Kerin was defeated by the Australian Labor Party led by Leader of the Opposition Mike Rann. Labor won 23 out of 47 seats, and then secured the one more seat it needed for a majority by gaining the support of independent Peter Lewis.

Australian Conservatives

The Australian Conservatives is an Australian political party formed and led by Cory Bernardi as a breakaway from the Liberal Party of Australia. The party had been established as a conservative political activist group in July 2016, as response to the results of the 2016 federal election. It was formed as a political party after Bernardi's resignation from the Liberals, following disagreements with the Liberal/National Coalition, its policies and leadership under Malcolm Turnbull. The Family First Party and their two state incumbents Dennis Hood and Robert Brokenshire joined and merged with the Australian Conservatives in April 2017. Brokenshire was not re-elected at the 2018 state election; Hood left the Conservatives to join the Liberal Party of Australia on 26 March 2018.

Dennis Hood

Dennis Garry Edward Hood (born 12 January 1970) is an Australian politician. Starting out in 2006 as a Family First Party member of the South Australian Legislative Council, he became South Australian state leader of Australian Conservatives, before defecting to the Liberal Party shortly after the 2018 state election.

Dignity Party (South Australia)

Dignity Party previously known as Dignity for Disability or Dignity 4 Disability or D4D (known as Dignity for Disabled until 2010) is a political party in the Australian state of South Australia. The party had one parliamentary member, Kelly Vincent, elected at the 2010 state election to the eleventh and last seat for an eight-year term in the 22-member Legislative Council in the Parliament of South Australia. She was not re-elected in the 2018 state election. In 2016, the name of the political party was changed to the Dignity Party to better represent equality in all forms including race, gender, age and sexual orientation.

Electoral district of Mawson

Mawson is a single-member electoral district for the South Australian House of Assembly. It covers the entirety of Kangaroo Island, and parts of the local government areas of Alexandrina Council, the City of Onkaparinga, and the District Council of Yankalilla. Major localities in the district include Cape Jervis, Kingscote, McLaren Vale, Port Willunga, Sellicks Beach, Willunga and Yankalilla.

The electorate was created in the 1969 redistribution, taking effect at the 1970 election. It is named after Sir Douglas Mawson, a geologist and explorer who made several expeditions to Antarctica. For the first three decades of its existence, it was a bellwether seat held by the party of government. This pattern was broken at the 2002 election, when Robert Brokenshire held the seat for the Liberals amidst a Labor election victory. Although it was thought that Brokenshire had established a base in Mawson, it reverted to form at the 2006 election, when Labor candidate and former journalist Leon Bignell won amid that year's massive Labor landslide. Bignell went on to increase his seat margins at the 2010 and 2014 elections against the statewide trend, at odds with decades of voting patterns in the electorate. The 2016 redistribution ahead of the 2018 election heavily redistributed Mawson from a 5.6 percent Labor seat to a notional 3.2 percent Liberal seat, taking in areas down the coast as far as and including Kangaroo Island. However, Bignell picked up a swing of over four percent to narrowly retain the seat even as Labor lost government; he thus became its second opposition member.

Electoral results for the district of Mawson

This is a list of electoral results for the Electoral district of Mawson in South Australian state elections.

Family First Party

The Family First Party was a conservative political party in Australia, in existence from 2002 to 2017. It was founded in South Australia and enjoyed its greatest popularity in that state.

Family First had three candidates elected to the Senate during its existence—Steve Fielding (2005–2011), Bob Day (2014–2016), and Lucy Gichuhi (2017; elected on a countback following Day being declared ineligible). At state level, the party won a seat in the South Australian Legislative Council across four consecutive state elections (2002, 2006, 2010, and 2014). It also briefly had representatives in the New South Wales Legislative Council and Western Australian Legislative Council, as a result of defections from other parties.

The party was generally considered to be part of the Christian right. Though it had no formal affiliation with any particular religious organisation, Family First was strongly linked to the Pentecostal church in South Australia, and nationally from smaller Christian denominations. Family First in South Australia was viewed as an infusion of ex-Liberals via Robert Brokenshire and Bob Day. Originally advocating a moral and family values agenda, Day, who would become Family First's major donor, later reoriented Family First to begin to emphasise issues such as industrial relations reform, free speech and smaller government, which brought Family First closer to Cory Bernardi's Australian Conservatives. Family First and their two state incumbents Dennis Hood and Brokenshire joined and merged with Bernardi's Australian Conservatives in April 2017.

Kelly Vincent

Kelly Leah Vincent (born 25 October 1988) is an Australian playwright, actor and former politician. She was elected at the 2010 state election for the Dignity Party to the eleventh and last seat for an eight-year term in the 22-member Legislative Council in the Parliament of South Australia.Vincent has cerebral palsy and attended parliament in a wheelchair. Parliament House underwent installation of a specifically designed desk inside the chamber, as well as wheelchair accessible toilets and ramps.

Kerin Ministry

The Kerin Ministry was the 70th ministry of the Government of South Australia, led by Rob Kerin, 43rd Premier of South Australia and leader of the South Australian Branch of the Liberal Party. It commenced on 22 October 2001, when Kerin succeeded John Olsen as Liberal leader and Premier.

Leon Bignell

Leon William Kennedy Bignell (born 1966), Australian politician, is the member for Mawson representing the South Australian Branch of the Australian Labor Party since the 2006 election.

List of South Australian Legislative Council appointments

This is a list of appointments to the South Australian Legislative Council, caused by the resignation or death of an incumbent member. A departure creates a casual vacancy which is filled by a candidate of the same affiliation in a joint sitting of the Parliament of South Australia. The constitution states that if the previous sitting Legislative Council member was at the time of his/her election the representative of a particular political party, that party should nominate a replacement from amongst its own members.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1993–1997

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1993 to 1997, as elected at the 1993 state election:

1 The Labor member for Elizabeth, Martyn Evans, resigned in early 1994 to contest a by-election for the federal seat of Bonython. Labor candidate Lea Stevens won the resulting by-election on 9 April 1994.

2 The Liberal member for Torrens, Joe Tiernan, died on 31 March 1994. Labor candidate Robyn Geraghty won the resulting by-election on 7 May 1994.

3 The Labor member for Taylor and former Premier of South Australia, Lynn Arnold, resigned in late 1994. Labor candidate Trish White won the resulting by-election on 5 November 1994.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1997–2002

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1997 to 2002, as elected at the 1997 state election:

1 The member for Mackillop, Mitch Williams, was elected as an independent, but rejoined the Liberal Party on 6 December 1999.

2 The member for Hammond, Peter Lewis, was expelled from the Liberal Party on 6 July 2000. He continued to sit in the Assembly as an independent.

3 The member for Fisher, Bob Such, resigned from the Liberal Party on 12 October 2000. He continued to sit in the Assembly as an independent.

4 The member for Price, Murray De Laine, resigned from the Labor Party on 15 August 2001 after losing preselection to recontest his seat. He served out the remainder of his term as an independent.

5 The member for Ross Smith, Ralph Clarke, resigned from the Labor Party on 27 November 2001 after losing preselection to recontest his seat. He served out the remainder of his term as an independent.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 2002–2006

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 2002 to 2006, as elected at the 2002 state election:

1 Kris Hanna, the member for Mitchell, was elected as a representative of the Labor Party, but resigned from the party on 30 January 2003 and joined the South Australian Greens. He later resigned from the party on 8 February 2006, after failing to win the top position on their Legislative Council ticket for the 2006 election, and served out the remainder of his term as an independent.

Members of the South Australian Legislative Council, 2006–2010

This is a list of members of the South Australian Legislative Council between 2006 and 2010, spanning the 50th (elected in 2002) and 51st (elected in 2006) Parliament of South Australia. As half of the Legislative Council's terms expired at each state election, half of these members were elected at the 2002 state election with terms expiring in 2010, while the other half were elected at the 2006 state election with terms expiring in 2014.

1 Labor MLC Terry Roberts died on 18 February 2006. Labor candidate Bernard Finnigan was appointed for the remaining four years of Redford's term on 2 May 2006.

2 Liberal MLC Angus Redford resigned from the Legislative Council in March 2006 in an unsuccessful attempt to shift to the House of Assembly. Liberal candidate Stephen Wade was appointed for the remaining four years of Redford's term on 2 May 2006.

3 Independent MLC Nick Xenophon resigned on 15 October 2007 in order to run for the Australian Senate at the 2007 federal election. Xenophon's second running mate, John Darley, was appointed to the casual vacancy on 21 November 2007.

4 Family First MLC Andrew Evans resigned on 3 July 2008. Robert Brokenshire, a former Liberal MHA, was appointed as Evans' replacement on 24 July 2008.

5 Democrats MLC Sandra Kanck resigned on 7 November 2008. David Winderlich was appointed as Kanck's replacement on 17 February 2009.

6 Democrats MLC David Winderlich resigned from the party on 7 October 2009 and served out his term as an independent.

Members of the South Australian Legislative Council, 2010–2014

This is a list of members of the South Australian Legislative Council between 2010 and 2014, spanning the 51st (started 2006) and 52nd (starting 2010) Parliament of South Australia. As half of the Legislative Council's terms expired at each state election, half of these members were elected at the 2006 state election with terms expiring in 2014, while the other half were elected at the 2010 state election with terms expiring in 2018.

1 Bernard Finnigan was suspended from the Labor Party on 2 May 2011. He sat in parliament thereafter as an independent.[1]

2 Labor MLC Paul Holloway resigned on 15 August 2011. Gerry Kandelaars was appointed as his replacement on 13 September 2011.

3 Labor MLC Bob Sneath resigned on 5 October 2012. Kyam Maher was appointed as his replacement on 17 October 2012.

Members of the South Australian Legislative Council, 2014–2018

This is a list of members of the South Australian Legislative Council between 2014 and 2018, spanning the 52nd (started 2010) and 53rd (starting 2014) Parliaments of South Australia. As half of the Legislative Council's terms expired at each state election, half of these members were elected at the 2010 state election with terms expiring in 2018, while the other half were elected at the 2014 state election with terms expiring in 2022.

1 Independent MLC Bernard Finnigan, who had been elected as Labor in 2010 and became an independent in 2011, resigned on 12 November 2015. Labor's Peter Malinauskas replaced him on 1 December.

2 Labor MLC Gerry Kandelaars resigned on 17 February 2017. Labor's Justin Hanson replaced him on 28 February.

3 The Family First Party merged into Cory Bernardi's Australian Conservatives on 25 April 2017. Family First MLCs Robert Brokenshire and Dennis Hood joined the Conservatives.

4 Advance SA MLC John Darley, who used be member and elected as Nick Xenophon Team for close 10 years until he quits in August 17, 2017, for disagreements and shortly become independent for month until he and another former Xenophon affiliate, retired lawyer Peter Humphries decided to form a new State political party named Advance SA.

Parliamentary Budget Advisory Service

The Parliamentary Budget Advisory Service was established in South Australia in December 2017 to provide expertise to assist candidates in costing their campaign policies. It was an initiative of the Weatherill Government which preceded the 2018 South Australian election by three months.

Liberal (9)
Labor (8)
SA-Best (2)
Greens (2)
Advance SA (1)

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