Robb Nen

Robert Allen Nen (born November 28, 1969) is a former Major League Baseball right-handed relief pitcher. He spent most of his career as a closer. He is the son of former major league first baseman Dick Nen. He currently works in the Giants' front office as a special assistant to General Manager Farhan Zaidi.

Nen is best known for his years with the San Francisco Giants (1998–2002), with whom he was a three-time All-Star and played in the 2002 World Series. He also played with the Texas Rangers (1993) and Florida Marlins (1993–97); in 1997, Nen won the World Series championship with the Marlins.

Nen has 314 career saves with the Marlins (1993–1997; 108 saves) and Giants (1998–2002; 206 saves). He was 8th overall in career saves when he retired, and stands 21st at the end of the 2017 season.[1]

Nen wore number 31 as his jersey number throughout his career.

Robb Nen
Pitcher
Born: November 28, 1969 (age 49)
San Pedro, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 10, 1993, for the Texas Rangers
Last MLB appearance
September 28, 2002, for the San Francisco Giants
MLB statistics
Win–loss record45–42
Earned run average2.98
Strikeouts793
Saves314
Teams
Career highlights and awards

High school

He attended Los Alamitos High School and played varsity baseball with future UCLA Bruins outfielder Rob Katzaroff and future Giants Gold Glove-winning first baseman J. T. Snow. Nen played mostly at third base, and also did some pitching. He skipped college and went directly to the minor leagues.

Major League career

Nen was selected by the Rangers as a pitcher in the 32nd round of the 1987 MLB draft. The Rangers promoted him to their Major League roster in 1993. His partial season with the Rangers was marred by injuries and subpar results on the mound, resulting in a 6.35 earned run average.

On July 17 of his first year, the Rangers traded Nen and pitcher Kurt Miller to the Florida Marlins for Cris Carpenter.[2] Nen started one game for his new team and finished the 1993 season with a disappointing 7.02 ERA. The following season, the Marlins moved him to the bullpen in an effort to reduce the frequency of his arm injuries. Nen flourished in his new role and became the Marlins' new closer that year. He finished the strike-shortened 1994 season with 15 saves and a 2.95 ERA. Nen would continue to be a dominating closer for the Marlins, racking up a total of 108 saves and establishing himself as one of the elite closers of the 1990s. During the 1997 postseason, Nen pitched in eight games, including two saves in the World Series, as well as 1⅔ innings of scoreless relief in the 9th and 10th innings of Game 7 while the Marlins came back in the last inning, and subsequently won the World Series in the bottom of the 11th. Throughout the 1997 playoffs, Florida didn't lose a single game in which Nen made an appearance.

In a controversial move, the Marlins held a "fire sale" in which they traded away most of their high-caliber players in favor of gaining prospects and utilizing many of their minor league players, all while keeping their team payroll low. On November 18, 1997, Nen was traded to the Giants for Mike Villano, Joe Fontenot and Mick Pageler.

Nen was expected to fill in the closer role, a role recently vacated by Rod Beck, who left via free agency to the Chicago Cubs. If Beck had set the bar high for a San Francisco closer (199 saves in his 7-year tenure with the Giants), Nen would raise the bar. His first year yielded 40 saves with a 1.52 ERA and 110 strikeouts in 88⅔ innings. As a Giant, Nen was selected to three All-Star Games (1998, 1999, 2002) and finished 4th in voting for the 2000 National League Cy Young Award and 12th in the NL MVP voting (the award went to teammate Jeff Kent), both high honors for a closer. The following year, Nen led the National League with 45 saves. The 9th inning was affectionately renamed the "Nenth" by fans.

Nen's career reached its climax in the 2002 World Series. He earned saves in Games 1 and 4 of the series. Robb Nen's last game was October 26, 2002 at Edison International Field (now known as Angel Stadium of Anaheim). It was Game 6 (of 7) of the 2002 World Series.

The Giants, the National League wild card team, and the Anaheim Angels, the American League wild card team, played a seven-game series in which Nen earned two saves. The Giants entered Game 6 leading the series three games to two. Behind the pitching of starter Russ Ortiz, the Giants appeared to be cruising to an easy 5-0 victory and their first World Series title since 1954 (when they were still the New York Giants). In the seventh inning, however, Ortiz ran into trouble and was relieved by Felix Rodríguez. Rodriguez then gave up a three-run home run to the Angels' Scott Spiezio.

The Angels tacked on another run in the eighth with a lead-off home run by Darin Erstad. After two more runners reached base safely in the eighth, Nen came in to relieve Tim Worrell and try to protect what was now a shaky one-run Giants lead. But Nen was unable to shut down the Angels' surge and gave up a two-run double to eventual series MVP Troy Glaus, which put the Angels ahead by one run. They hung on to win the game, and won the series following a win the next day. Nen pitched with full awareness that he was likely jeopardizing his career and remains admired by Giants' fans for his self-sacrifice. It was, in fact, his final appearance. The 8 save opportunities (7 saved) in one postseason is a record, tied in 2015 by Jeurys Familia; the 7 saves ties the mark with 5 other pitchers (John Wetteland, Troy Percival, Brad Lidge, Koji Uehara and Greg Holland).

During the next two seasons, Nen spent time rehabilitating from three surgeries for a torn rotator cuff that he had aggravated during the middle of the 2002 season. The tear went through 40 to 75% of his right shoulder. When his contract with the Giants ended after the 2004 season, Nen filed for free agency but was not picked up by any team.

On February 20, 2005, Nen formally announced his retirement.[3] He is the all-time saves leader for the Giants with 206 saves.[4] His locker was maintained throughout the 2003 and 2004 seasons as he last left it and was formally retired in 2005, but his jersey continued to hang in the locker room both at home and on the road.

Pitching style

Nen was known for an unusual delivery in which he tapped his toe on the ground before releasing the ball. His signature pitch, a slider, was nicknamed "The Terminator." It looked like a fastball until it broke straight down at the plate at a velocity of up to 92 mph. In addition to the slider, Nen had a fastball that reached the upper 90s. A splitter rounded out Nen's pitching arsenal.

Post MLB career

Nen joined the Giants' baseball operations department as an instructor on both the major and minor league levels, while also advising general manager Brian Sabean on an as-needed basis.

Honors

Nen300
Plaque commemorating Nen's 300th career save.

In a ceremony before their July 9, 2005 game against the St. Louis Cardinals, the Giants honored Nen with a plaque commemorating his 300th career save. The plaque is now located on the public walkway behind the right-field wall of AT&T Park, not far from McCovey Cove.

See also

References

  1. ^ MLB career leaders in saves
  2. ^ Brousseau, Dave (December 24, 1996). "Marlins Re-sign Closer Nen". Orlando Sentinel. Retrieved January 11, 2015.
  3. ^ "End Of The Line For Nen, Greer". Reading Eagle. 21 February 2005. p. D4. Retrieved 25 August 2010.
  4. ^ "San Francisco Giants Top 10 Pitching Leaders". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 7 May 2015.

External links

1994 Florida Marlins season

The Florida Marlins' 1994 season was the second season for the Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise in the National League. It would begin with the team attempting to improve on their season from 1993. Their manager was Rene Lachemann. They played home games at Joe Robbie Stadium. They finished with a record of 51-64, last in the National League East. The season ended early as a result of the 1994 players strike.

1995 Florida Marlins season

The Florida Marlins' 1995 season was the third season for the Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise in the National League. It would begin with the team attempting to improve on their season from 1994. Their manager was Rene Lachemann. They played home games at Joe Robbie Stadium. They finished with a record of 67–76, fourth in the National League East. The Marlins scored 673 runs and allowed 673 runs to finish with a run differential of zero.

1995 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1995 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 113th season in the history of the franchise.

1997 Cleveland Indians season

The 1997 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Indians making their second World Series appearance in three years. The Indians finished in first place in the American League Central and hosted the 1997 Major League Baseball All-Star Game.

1997 Florida Marlins season

The Florida Marlins' 1997 season was the fifth season for the Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise in the National League. It would begin with the team attempting to improve on their season from 1996. Their manager was Jim Leyland. They played home games at Pro Player Stadium. They finished with a record of 92-70, posting the first winning season in franchise history and winning the NL Wild Card. They got through the National League playoffs and won the World Series over the Cleveland Indians.

1997 National League Division Series

The 1997 National League Division Series (NLDS), the opening round of the 1997 National League playoffs, began on Tuesday, September 30, and ended on Friday, October 3, with the champions of the three NL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. They were:

(1) San Francisco Giants (Western Division champions, 90–72) vs. (4) Florida Marlins (Wild Card, 92–70): Marlins win series, 3–0.

(2) Houston Astros (Central Division champions, 84–78) vs. (3) Atlanta Braves (Eastern Division champions, 101–61): Braves win series, 3–0.The Atlanta Braves and Florida Marlins went on to meet in the NL Championship Series (NLCS). The Marlins became the National League champions, and defeated the American League champion Cleveland Indians in the 1997 World Series.

1997 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1997 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 115th season in the history of the franchise.

1997 World Series

The 1997 World Series was the championship series of Major League Baseball's (MLB) 1997 season. The 93rd edition of the World Series, it was a best-of-seven playoff between the American League (AL) champion Cleveland Indians and the National League (NL) champion Florida Marlins. The Marlins, who were underdogs, defeated the Indians, four games to three, to win their first World Series championship. Game 7 was decided in extra innings on a walk-off single hit by Édgar Rentería. The series began on October 18 and ended on October 26 (after midnight October 27). Marlins pitcher Liván Hernández was named the World Series Most Valuable Player.

The Indians advanced to the World Series by defeating the New York Yankees in the AL Division Series, three games to two, and then the Baltimore Orioles in the AL Championship Series, four games to two; it was Cleveland's second World Series appearance in three years. The Marlins advanced to the World Series by defeating the San Francisco Giants in the NL Division Series, three games to none, and then the Atlanta Braves in the NL Championship Series, four games to two; the Marlins set an MLB record by reaching a World Series in just their fifth season of existence. This was the fourth time in World Series history a Game 7 went into extra innings, and was the most recent occasion until the 2016 World Series, in which the Indians also lost in extra innings. The Marlins' championship made them the first wild card team to ever win the World Series.

This was the only World Series that Paul Beeston would preside over as CEO of MLB. The previous four World Series had been presided over jointly by the league presidents (first Dr. Bobby Brown and then Gene Budig for the AL, Leonard Coleman for the NL).

1998 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1998 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 116th season in the history of the franchise.

1999 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1999 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 117th season in the history of the franchise.

2000 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 2000 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 118th season in the history of the franchise.

2002 National League Championship Series

The 2002 National League Championship Series (NLCS) was a Major League Baseball playoff series played from October 9 to 14 to determine the champion of the National League, between the Central Division champion St. Louis Cardinals and the wild-card qualifying San Francisco Giants. It was a rematch of the 1987 NLCS, in which the Cardinals defeated the Giants in seven games. The Cardinals, by virtue of being a division winner, had the home field advantage.

The two teams were victorious in the NL Division Series (NLDS), with the Cardinals defeating the West Division champion Arizona Diamondbacks three games to none, and the Giants defeating the East Division champion and heavily favored Atlanta Braves three games to two.

The Giants won the series in five games but were defeated by the Anaheim Angels in seven games in the World Series.

2002 National League Division Series

The 2002 National League Division Series (NLDS), the opening round of the 2002 National League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 1, and ended on Monday, October 7, with the champions of the three NL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams were:

(1) Atlanta Braves (Eastern Division champion, 101–59) vs. (4) San Francisco Giants (Wild Card, 95–66); Giants win series, 3–2.

(2) Arizona Diamondbacks (Western Division champion, 98–64) vs. (3) St. Louis Cardinals (Central Division champion, 97–65); Cardinals win series, 3–0.The Cardinals and Giants went on to meet in the NL Championship Series (NLCS). The Giants became the National League champion, and lost to the American League champion Anaheim Angels in the 2002 World Series.

2002 San Francisco Giants season

The 2002 San Francisco Giants season was the 120th in franchise history, the franchise's 45th season in San Francisco, and their third in Pacific Bell Park. The season ended with the Giants winning the National League pennant but losing to the Anaheim Angels in the 2002 World Series.

The Giants finished the regular season with a record of 95–66, ​2 1⁄2 games behind the Arizona Diamondbacks in the National League West standings. By virtue of having the best record among second-place teams in the National League, they won the NL wild card to earn a postseason berth.

In the postseason, the Giants faced the Atlanta Braves in the National League Division Series. After being brought to the brink of elimination, the Giants won Games 4 and 5 to clinch the series, three games to two. They went on to defeat the St. Louis Cardinals in the National League Championship Series by a series score of four games to one to win the franchise's 17th NL championship and its third in San Francisco. Then, in the World Series, they brought the Angels to the brink of elimination before the Angels came from behind to win Games 6 and 7.

2002 was manager Dusty Baker's tenth and final season managing the Giants. Following the season he departed to manage the Chicago Cubs.

2002 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals 2002 season was the team's 121st season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 111th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 97-65 during the season and won the National League Central division by 13 games over the Houston Astros. In the playoffs, the Cardinals defeated the Arizona Diamondbacks 3 games to 0 in the NLDS but lost to the San Francisco Giants 4 games to 1 in the NLCS.

Second baseman Fernando Viña, shortstop Édgar Rentería, third baseman Scott Rolen, and outfielder Jim Edmonds each won Gold Gloves this year.

On June 18, long-time broadcaster Jack Buck died at the age of 77, while four days later, pitcher Darryl Kile was found dead in a Chicago hotel room, at age 33.

2002 World Series

The 2002 World Series was the championship series of Major League Baseball (MLB)'s 2002 season. The 98th edition of the World Series, it was a best-of-seven playoff between the American League (AL) champion Anaheim Angels and the National League (NL) champion San Francisco Giants; the Angels defeated the Giants, four games to three, to win their first, and, to date, only World Series championship. The series was played from October 19–27, 2002, at Pacific Bell Park in San Francisco and Edison International Field of Anaheim in Anaheim.

This was the first World Series since the 1995 inception of the wild card in MLB (and the last until 2014) in which both wild card teams would vie for the title. The Angels finished the regular season in second place in the AL West division. They defeated the four-time defending AL champion New York Yankees, three games to one, in the best-of-five AL Division Series, and in doing so won their first postseason series in franchise history. They then defeated the Minnesota Twins, four games to one, in the best-of-seven AL Championship Series to advance to the World Series, another first in franchise history. The Giants finished the regular season in second place in the NL West division. They defeated the Atlanta Braves in the NL Division Series and the St. Louis Cardinals in the NL Championship Series to advance to the World Series, giving the team their 20th NL pennant and 17th appearance in the Fall Classic but only their third since moving from New York City to San Francisco in 1958.

The series was the fourth World Series played between two teams from California, after 1974, 1988, and 1989. Barry Bonds, Reggie Sanders, and J. T. Snow each hit home runs to help propel the Giants to win Game one. Game two was a high-scoring affair that the Angels ultimately won on Tim Salmon's eighth-inning home run. The Angels routed the Giants in Game three, but lost Game four on a tie-breaking eighth-inning single by the Giants' David Bell. The Giants brought the Angels to the brink of elimination by winning Game five in a blowout. The Giants were eight outs away from winning the Series in Game six, but late game home runs by Scott Spiezio and Darin Erstad, as well as a two-RBI double by Troy Glaus helped the Angels overcome a five-run, seventh-inning deficit to win. A three-run double by Garret Anderson was the difference in the Angels' Game seven win to clinch the series. Glaus was named the World Series Most Valuable Player. The two teams set a record for combined most home runs in a World Series (21), which stood until 2017.

Dick Nen

Richard Leroy Nen (born September 24, 1939) is a retired American professional baseball player. A former Major League Baseball first baseman, Nen appeared in 367 games for the Los Angeles Dodgers (1963), Washington Senators (1965–1967, 1970) and Chicago Cubs (1968). He threw and batted left-handed, stood 6 feet 2 inches (1.88 m) tall and weighed 200 pounds (91 kg). He is the father of former major league relief pitcher Robb Nen.

List of Miami Marlins team records

The Miami Marlins are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in the U.S. state of Florida. The Marlins became members of MLB as an expansion team in the 1993 season. Through 2017, they have played 3,981 games, winning 1,870 and losing 2,111 for a winning percentage of .470. This list documents the superlative records and accomplishments of team members during their tenures as Marlins in MLB's National League East.

Giancarlo Stanton holds the most franchise records as of the end of the 2018 season, with ten records, including both the most career and single-season Home runs, RBI, slugging percentage, and total bases records.

No Marlin holds a Major League or National League record for any of the below statistics. However, the Marlins are tied with the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim and the Houston Astros for the shortest franchise record losing streak, recording 11 straight losses twice in 1998 and once in June 2011.

Tim Worrell

Timothy Howard Worrell (born July 5, 1967) is a former professional baseball pitcher. A right-hander, he pitched all or part of fourteen seasons in Major League Baseball, primarily as a relief pitcher. During his major league career, Worrell pitched for nine teams, including the San Diego Padres, Cleveland Indians, Detroit Tigers, Oakland Athletics, Baltimore Orioles, Chicago Cubs, San Francisco Giants (twice), Philadelphia Phillies, and Arizona Diamondbacks.

Worrell's greatest success came in 2003 when he replaced the injured Robb Nen as the closer for San Francisco. After the season Worrell signed with the Philadelphia Phillies, where he returned to his previous role as a set-up pitcher, often pitching the eighth inning before Phillies closer Billy Wagner entered the game.

Worrell is the younger brother of former Major League pitcher Todd Worrell, himself a former closer for the St. Louis Cardinals and Los Angeles Dodgers.

On May 6, 2005, Worrell stated that he was dealing with "personal psychological issues" that had to be resolved and was subsequently placed on the 15-day disabled list. Prior to this disclosure Worrell had struggled, posting a 9.82 ERA, by far the worst of his career. Seemingly back to his old self, Worrell returned to pitch a perfect ninth on July 4, 2005 and completed the season in Arizona with an exceptional 0.90 ERA over his last 18 games.

On December 1, 2005, Worrell's return to the San Francisco Giants was agreed, with a two-year contract valued at $4 million.

On January 10, 2007, he announced his retirement due to a persistent nerve problem in his neck. Worrell stated that his major league career is not completely over as he wanted to get into coaching. He is currently the rehab pitching coach for the Peoria Padres.

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.