Rio Group

The Rio Group (G-Rio) was a permanent association of political consultation of Latin America and Caribbean countries, created in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on December 18, 1986 with the purpose of creating a better political relationship among the countries. It was succeeded in 2011 by the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States[1]

The first countries to be members of this organization were Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, Panama, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela, the same members of the Contadora Group (Mexico, Colombia and Panama) and the Contadora Support Group (Argentina, Brazil, Peru, and Uruguay) which is also known as the Group of Lima or Group of Eight. The purpose of this group was to strengthen the political relationships and some issues among Latin American and Caribbean countries, this group was based on consultations of common interest such as the Latin American unity, by 2010 the Rio Group was composed by 23 countries and 1 representative from the Eastern Caribbean. On July 29, 1985, Argentina, Peru, and Uruguay announced the creation of the Contadora Support Group or Lima Group, which together with the Contadora Group was known as the Group of Eight.[2]

In 1983, the governments of Mexico, Colombia, Panama, and Venezuela established a system to promote peace in Central America. On June 6, 1986, The Central American countries visited Panama and signed the Contadora Act for peace and cooperation of Central America in which they signed to strengthen peace and cooperation among the peoples of the region and improve political confidence among the Central American countries caused by border incidents such as the arms race, arms trafficking, among others. this was also signed to restore economic development and cooperation in Central America and thus be able to negotiate better access to international markets.

Rio Group
Rio group countries
SuccessorCommunity of Latin American and Caribbean States
Established1986
Dissolved2011
Membership
24 Latin American and Caribbean states

Goals

  • Political cooperation among the governments of member countries.
  • Examine and solve international issues.
  • Promote the best function and coordination of Latin American organizations.
  • Present solutions for problems that affect the region.
  • Improving inter-American relations.
  • New fields of cooperation that favor economic, social, scientific and technological development.[3]

Member states

Member states/organizations in alphabetical order by column:

List of summit meetings

Summit Year City Seat country
I 1987 Acapulco  Mexico
II 1988 Montevideo  Uruguay
III 1989 Ica  Peru
IV 1990 Caracas  Venezuela
V 1991 Cartagena  Colombia
VI 1992 Buenos Aires  Argentina
VII 1993 Santiago  Chile
VIII 1994 Rio de Janeiro  Brazil
IX 1995 Quito  Ecuador
X 1996 Cochabamba  Bolivia
XI 1997 Asunción  Paraguay
XII 1998 Panama City  Panama
XIII 1999 Veracruz  Mexico
XIV 2000 Cartagena  Colombia
XV 2001 Santiago  Chile
XVI 2002 San José  Costa Rica
XVII 2003 Cusco  Peru
XVIII 2004 Rio de Janeiro  Brazil
XIX 2007 Georgetown  Guyana
XX 2008 Santo Domingo  Dominican Republic
I Extraordinaria 2009 Zacatecas  Mexico
II Extraordinaria 2009 Managua  Nicaragua
XXI 2010 Cancún  Mexico

Institutional Ministerial Meetings with the European Union

The Rio Group and the European Union maintains an institutionalized dialogue, based on the 1990 Rome Declaration.[5]

Summit Year Month Date City Country
I 1991 April 26-27 Luxembourg City Luxembourg
II 1992 May 28-29 Santiago Chile
III 1993 April 23-24 Copenhagen Denmark
IV 1994 April 22-23 São Paulo Brazil
V 1995 March 17 Paris France
VI 1996 April 15-16 Cochabamba Bolivia
VII 1997 April 7-8 Noordwijk Netherlands
VIII 1998 February 11-12 Panama Panama
IX 2000 February 24 Vilamoura Portugal
X 2001 March 28 Santiago Chile
XI 2003 April 24-25 Vouliagmeni Greece

Rio Group ministers meet in Brasilia

Foreign ministers of the group of Rio gathered for a two-day meeting to discuss issues including the political situation in Haiti, and to make preparations for the group's 18th summit set for November 4–5. During the meeting, Celso Amorim said that the Brazilian troops are taking part in the United Nations Stabilization Mission for Haiti (MINUSTAH). He discussed the integration of South and Latin America, and said that the Rio Group could play an important role in facilitating the reinsertion of Cuba into the family of Latin America.

Amorim also said “The Group of Rio has developed its capability to address new issues, mostly economic and cooperation ones, and is now serving as an important mechanism for dialogue.”

During the meeting in Nov 4-5 in Rio de Janeiro, the group discuss the effects of globalization on Latin America countries. By this time Rio Group compromises 19 countries, including Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela.[6]

The Cancun Summit and the renovation of Rio Group

Carlos Federico Domínguez Ávila

During the meeting of presidents of Latin America and the Caribbean in Cancun, Mexico, the presidents discussed the renewal and recomposition of the Permanent Mechanism for Consultation and Political Coordination, also known as the Rio Group. The Rio Group was created in 1986 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil by representatives of eight countries, by 2010 the Rio Group was composed by 23 countries and 1 representative from the Eastern Caribbean. One of the most important virtues of the Rio Group was Meridian 47n. 115, Feb.2010 [p. 27-28] the only Political and diplomatic forum that brings together all 33 states that make up “America”.[7]

See also

References

  1. ^ Presidentes constituyen la Comunidad de Estados Latinoamericanos y Caribeños, EFE, February 23, 2010.
  2. ^ "Rio Group | Treaties & Regimes". www.nti.org. Retrieved 2018-03-21.
  3. ^ "Gloobal - Grupo de Rio". www.gloobal.net. Retrieved 2018-03-21.
  4. ^ Rio Group, Nuclear Threat Initiative (last updated April 25, 2012).
  5. ^ "plantilla.jpg". 2005-04-13. Archived from the original on 2005-04-13. Retrieved 2018-03-21.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  6. ^ Roll Call, CQ (August 20, 2004). "Group of Rio ministers meet in Brasilia on regional issues, XINHUA". World Sources Online.
  7. ^ Dominguez Avila, Carlos Federico (2010). "A cúpula de Cancun e a recomposição do Grupo do Rio: Apontamentos para um debate". Meridiano 47 - Journal of Global Studies.
2011 Campeonato Carioca

The 2011 Campeonato Estadual da Serie A de Profissionais do Rio de Janeiro is the 110th season of Rio de Janeiro's top professional football league. The competition will begin January 19 and end on May 15. Botafago is the defending champion.

2018 Campeonato Carioca

The 2018 Campeonato Carioca de Futebol is the 115th edition of the top division of football in the state of Rio de Janeiro. The competition is organized by FERJ. The top four teams in the final standings of the tournament not otherwise qualified will qualify to compete in the 2019 Copa do Brasil. Additionally, the top three teams not competing in any level of the national Campeonato Brasileiro qualify for the 2019 Brasileiro Série D.

The format remains unchanged from the 2017 edition. In the First Round, six teams play a round-robin tournament, with the top two teams qualifying for the main competition and the bottom four entering the Relegation Round. The main competition is divided into two tournaments, the Taça Guanabara and Taça Rio, each with two 6-team groups. The top two teams in each of the groups qualify for the championship of that tournament. The top four teams in the final standings qualify for the Final Round (the Taça Guanabara and Taça Rio champions automatically qualify). The Final Round is a knockout-style playoff with a two-legged final played at the Maracanã Stadium. in Macaé was punished with the loss of 26 points by TJD-RJ by irregular escalation of left-side Luke Gabriel in six matches of the Taça Rio.

Argentina–Paraguay relations

Argentine-Paraguayan relations are foreign relations between Argentina and Paraguay. Diplomatic relations between those 2 neighbors were established in 1811, with the signing of an agreement on Friendship, Assistance and Trade. Both countries were at war between 1864 and 1870 (War of the Triple Alliance), and never fought each other since.

Argentina has an embassy in Asuncion and 2 Consulates-General (in Ciudad del Este and Encarnación). Paraguay has an embassy in Buenos Aires and 7 consulates (in Clorinda, Corrientes, Formosa, Posadas, Resistencia, Rosario and Puerto Iguazú).

Both countries are full members of Mercosur, Union of South American Nations, Organization of American States, Organization of Ibero-American States, Rio Group, Group of 77, Latin American Economic System and Latin American Integration Association.

Argentina–Peru relations

Argentina–Peru relations are foreign relations between Argentina and Peru. Both countries established diplomatic relations on July 10, 1822. Argentina has an embassy in Lima. Peru has an embassy in Buenos Aires, 3 general consulates (in Córdoba, La Plata and Mendoza) and 2 honorary consulates (in Corrientes and Rosario).

Both countries are full members of the Rio Group, of the Latin Union, of the Association of Spanish Language Academies, of the Organization of American States, of the Organization of Ibero-American States and of the Union of South American Nations.

Chile–Uruguay relations

Chile–Uruguay relations are foreign relations between Chile and Uruguay. Chile has an embassy in Montevideo. Uruguay has an embassy in Santiago.

Historically, both countries were part of the Spanish Empire until the early 19th century. Both countries are full members of the Group of 77, of the Rio Group, of the Latin American Integration Association, of the Association of Spanish Language Academies, of the Organization of American States, of the Organization of Ibero-American States, of the Union of South American Nations, of the Cairns Group, and of the Group of 77.

Colombia–Uruguay relations

Colombia–Uruguay relations are foreign relations between the Republic of Colombia and the Oriental Republic of Uruguay. Colombia has an embassy in Montevideo. Uruguay has an embassy in Bogotá and a consulate in Cali.Historically, both countries were part of the Spanish Empire until the early 19th century. Nowadays, both countries are full members of the Rio Group, of the Latin Union, of ALADI, of the Association of Spanish Language Academies, of the Organization of American States, of the Organization of Ibero-American States, of the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States, of the Union of South American Nations, of the Cairns Group, and of the Group of 77.Colombia is becoming a significant trading partner of Uruguay.

Community of Latin American and Caribbean States

The Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (Spanish: Comunidad de Estados Latinoamericanos y Caribeños, CELAC; Portuguese: Comunidade de Estados Latino-Americanos e Caribenhos; French: Communauté des États latino-américains et caribéens; Dutch: Gemeenschap van Latijns-Amerikaanse en Caraïbische Staten) is a regional bloc of Latin American and Caribbean states thought out on February 23, 2010, at the Rio Group–Caribbean Community Unity Summit, and created on December 3, 2011, in Caracas, Venezuela, with the signature of The Declaration of Caracas. It consists of 33 sovereign countries in the Americas representing roughly 600 million people. Due to the focus of the organization on Latin American and Caribbean countries, other countries and territories in the Americas, Canada and the United States, as well as the overseas territories in the Americas of France (Overseas departments and territories of France), the Netherlands (Dutch Caribbean), Denmark (Greenland) and the United Kingdom (British Overseas Territories) are not included.CELAC is an example of a decade-long push for deeper integration within Latin America. CELAC was created to deepen Latin American integration and by some to reduce the significant influence of the United States on the politics and economics of Latin America. It is seen as an alternative to the Organization of American States (OAS), the regional body that was founded by United States and 21 other Latin American nations originally as a countermeasure to potential Soviet influence in the region.CELAC is the successor of the Rio Group and the Latin American and Caribbean Summit on Integration and Development (CALC). In July 2010, CELAC selected President of Venezuela Hugo Chávez and President of Chile Sebastián Piñera, as co-chairs of the forum to draft statutes for the organization.

Costa Rica–Uruguay relations

Costa Rica–Uruguay relations are foreign relations between Costa Rica and Uruguay. Costa Rica has an embassy in Montevideo. Uruguay has an embassy in San José, the ambassador being also concurrent to Belize and Guyana.

Historically, both countries were part of the Spanish Empire until the early 19th century. Nowadays, both countries are full members of the Rio Group, of the Latin Union, of the Association of Spanish Language Academies, of the Organization of American States, of the Organization of Ibero-American States, of the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States, of the Cairns Group, and of the Group of 77.

Cuba–Uruguay relations

Cuba–Uruguay relations are foreign relations between Cuba and Uruguay. Diplomatic relationships have been intermittent along the decades; in 2005 they were reestablished.

Cuba has an embassy in Montevideo. Uruguay has an embassy in Havana.Historically, both countries were part of the Spanish Empire until the early 19th century (although Cuba kept its status as a Spanish colony for a longer time). Nowadays, both countries are full members of the Rio Group, of the Latin Union, of Latin American Integration Association, of the Association of Academies of the Spanish Language, of the Organization of Ibero-American States and of the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States.

Cuba is becoming a significant trading partner of Uruguay.

Dominican Republic–Uruguay relations

Dominican Republic–Uruguay relations are foreign relations between the Dominican Republic and Uruguay. The Dominican Republic has an embassy in Montevideo. Uruguay has an embassy in Santo Domingo.Historically, both countries were part of the Spanish Empire until the early 19th century. Nowadays, both countries are full members of the Rio Group, of the Latin Union, of the Association of Spanish Language Academies, of the Organization of American States, of the Organization of Ibero-American States, of the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States, and of the Group of 77.The Dominican Republic is becoming a significant trading partner for Uruguay.

Ecuador–Uruguay relations

Ecuador–Uruguay relations are foreign relations between Ecuador and Uruguay. Ecuador has an embassy in Montevideo. Uruguay has an embassy in Quito and a consulate in Guayaquil.Historically, both countries were part of the Spanish Empire until the early 19th century. Nowadays, both countries are full members of the Rio Group, of the Latin Union, of ALADI, of the Association of Spanish Language Academies, of the Organization of American States, of the Organization of Ibero-American States, of the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States, of the Union of South American Nations, and of the Group of 77.Ecuador is becoming a significant trading partner for Uruguay.

El Salvador–Uruguay relations

El Salvador–Uruguay relations are foreign relations between El Salvador and Uruguay. El Salvador has an embassy in Montevideo. Uruguay has an embassy in San Salvador.Historically, both countries were part of the Spanish Empire until the early 19th century. Nowadays, both countries are full members of the Rio Group, of the Latin Union, of the Association of Academies of the Spanish Language, of the Organization of American States, of the Organization of Ibero-American States, of the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States, and of the Group of 77.

Foreign relations of Paraguay

Paraguayan foreign policy has concentrated on maintaining good relations with its neighbors, and it has been an active proponent of regional co-operation. It is a member of the United Nations and has served one term in the UN Security Council in 1967-1969. It maintains membership in several international financial institutions, including the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank, and the International Monetary Fund. It also belongs to the Organization of American States, the Latin American Integration Association (ALADI), the Rio Group, INTERPOL, MERCOSUR (the Southern Cone Common Market) and UNASUR

At the political level, diplomatic affairs and international relations of Paraguay are officially handled by the Ministry of Foreign Relations, which answers to the executive branch of the government. The current Minister of Foreign Relations as of 2018 is Luis Alberto Castiglioni Unlike any other country in South America, Paraguay recognizes the Republic of China instead of the People's Republic of China. Although not a particularly large country in absolute terms, Paraguay presently is the largest country maintaining official diplomatic relations with the Republic of China.

Honduras–Uruguay relations

Honduras–Uruguay relations are foreign relations between Honduras and Uruguay. Honduras has an embassy in Argentina, its ambassador being concurrent to Uruguay; there is a consulate in Montevideo. Uruguay has two consulates, one in Tegucigalpa, the other in San Pedro Sula; the Uruguayan ambassador to Guatemala is concurrent to Honduras.Historically, both countries were part of the Spanish Empire until the early 19th century. Nowadays, both countries are full members of the Rio Group, of the Latin Union, of the Association of Spanish Language Academies, of the Organization of American States, of the Organization of Ibero-American States, of the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States and of the Group of 77.Bilateral trade between both countries is small but relatively stable. Honduras exports coffee, while Uruguay exports mainly pharmaceuticals and rice.Relations between the two countries were suspended following the 2009 Honduran coup d'état (which Uruguay condemned), but eventually restored in 2011 following the return of former President Manuel Zelaya. Then-President Porfirio Lobo made a working visit to Montevideo in 2013 for the Mercosur summit after being invited by Uruguayan President José Mujica.

List of regional organizations by population

The following is a list of regional organizations by population in 2018.

Mexico–Uruguay relations

Mexico–Uruguay relations are foreign relations between Mexico and Uruguay. Both nations are members of the Latin American Integration Association, Organization of American States, Organization of Ibero-American States and the Rio Group.

Nicaragua–Uruguay relations

Nicaragua–Uruguay relations are foreign relations between Nicaragua and Uruguay. Nicaragua has an embassy in Montevideo. Uruguay has an embassy in Managua.Historically, both countries were part of the Spanish Empire until the early 19th century. Nowadays, both countries are full members of the Rio Group, of the Latin Union, of the Association of Spanish Language Academies, of the Organization of American States, of the Organization of Ibero-American States, of the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States and of the Group of 77.Both countries have subscribed a bilateral tourism agreement. Bilateral trade between both countries is small but relatively stable.

Peru–Uruguay relations

Peru–Uruguay relations are foreign relations between Peru and Uruguay. Both countries established diplomatic relations in 1912, but various agreements were informally passed during the second half of the 19th century. Peru has an embassy in Montevideo. Uruguay has an embassy in Lima and an honorary consulate in Arequipa.Historically, both countries were part of the Spanish Empire until the early 19th century. Today, both countries are full members of the Rio Group, the Latin Union, ALADI, the Association of Spanish Language Academies, the Organization of American States, the Organization of Ibero-American States, the Union of South American Nations, the Cairns Group and the Group of 77.There are a number of Peruvian citizens living in Uruguay, as well as some Uruguayan expatriates in Peru.

Peru is becoming a significant trading partner for Uruguay.

Uruguay–Venezuela relations

Uruguay–Venezuela relations are foreign relations between Uruguay and Venezuela. Venezuela has an embassy in Montevideo. Uruguay has an embassy in Caracas and a consulate in Maracaibo.Historically, both countries were part of the Spanish Empire until the early 19th century. Nowadays, both countries are full members of the Rio Group, of the Latin Union, of ALADI, of the Association of Spanish Language Academies, of the Organization of American States, of the Organization of Ibero-American States, of the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States, of the Union of South American Nations and of the Group of 77.Relations between both countries are not easy. The ruling Broad Front has an official position of support for the regime of Nicolás Maduro, while opposition politicians flatly denounce its human rights violations. Lately, the Uruguayan diplomat Luis Almagro, who in his role as Secretary General of OAS denounced the Venezuelan situation, is facing harsh questioning inside his party.

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