Ring cairn

A ring cairn (also correctly termed a ring bank enclosure, but sometimes wrongly described as a ring barrow) is a circular or slightly oval, ring-shaped, low (maximum 0.5 metres high) embankment, several metres wide and from 8 to 20 metres in diameter. It is made of stone and earth and was originally empty in the centre. In several cases the middle of the ring was later used (at Hound Tor, for example, there is a stone cist in the centre). The low profile of these cairns is not always possible to make out without conducting excavations.

Ring Cairn at Showery Tor - geograph.org.uk - 116957
The scarcely visible ring cairn at Showery Tor
Greenish Ring Cairn - geograph.org.uk - 898257
Greenish Ring Cairn

Distribution

These sites date to the Bronze Age and occur in Cornwall; Wales and Derbyshire (Barbrook IV and V and Green Low) in England and in Ireland.

Description

Ring Cairn near Mains of Moyness - geograph.org.uk - 257472
Ring cairn near Mains of Moyness

The cairns look like flat variants of the significantly higher Clava cairns, which are often called ring cairns by laymen. The situation is rather different on the gritstones of the Eastern Uplands. Here it is more common to find smaller stone circles and ring cairns. The patterned relationship of these smaller monuments to cairnfield systems throughout the Eastern Moors suggests that they were built and used by specific communities, probably in the centuries around 2000 BC. Although details vary from one site to another, nearly all comprise a ring of small upright stones set on the inner edge of a roughly circular bank.

Function

Ring cairns may have had a function that lay somewhere between that of the much older henges and the contemporary stone circles. The fact that in southeast Wales there are so few stone circles could be related to the fact that ring cairns were built there instead.

Although graves have been found in some ring cairns, this does not appear to be their original purpose. In the central area, graves and pits with cremation ashes, fireplaces and sometimes, small, low cairns are found.

The slightly oval ring cairns near Arthur's Stone on the Gower Peninsula show that the inner edges of ring cairns were especially carefully constructed and were set in front of a small grave. Originally there was a passage through the ring here, about ten metres across, that was blocked when the cairn ceased to be used.

See also

Literature

  • F. Lynch: Ring cairns and related monuments in Wales. In: Scottish Archaeological Forum. 4, 1972 S. 61–80
  • F. Lynch: Ring cairns in Britain and Ireland: their design and purpose. In: Ulster Journal of Archaeology. 42, 1979 S. 1–19

External links

Askrigg

Askrigg is a small village and civil parish in Wensleydale in the Yorkshire Dales National Park. It is part of the Richmondshire district of North Yorkshire, England. The village and its parish are located in Upper Wensleydale, 12 miles (19 km) west of Leyburn, and 5 miles (8.0 km) east of Hawes. It is 26.4 miles (42.5 km) west of the county town of Northallerton.

Clava cairn

The Clava cairn is a type of Bronze Age circular chamber tomb cairn, named after the group of three cairns at Balnuaran of Clava, to the east of Inverness in Scotland. There are about 50 cairns of this type in an area round about Inverness. They fall into two sub-types, one typically consisting of a corbelled passage grave with a single burial chamber linked to the entrance by a short passage and covered with a cairn of stones, with the entrances oriented south west towards midwinter sunset. In the other sub-type an annular ring cairn encloses an apparently unroofed area with no formal means of access from the outside. In both sub-types a stone circle surrounds the whole tomb and a kerb often runs around the cairn. The heights of the standing stones vary in height so that the tallest fringe the entrance (oriented south west) and the shortest are directly opposite it.

Where Clava-type tombs have still contained burial remains, only one or two bodies appear to have been buried in each, and the lack of access to the second sub-type suggests that there was no intention of re-visiting the dead or communally adding future burials as had been the case with Neolithic cairn tombs.

Elim, Anglesey

Elim is a small village in west-central Ynys Môn, Wales, located around 1 mile (1.6 km) south-east of Llanddeusant and 3 miles (4.8 km) south-west of Llyn Alaw.

It is sited close to the Bedd Branwen ring cairn.

Ewden valley

Ewden Valley is a valley in the civil parish of Bradfield in the Stocksbridge and Upper Don electoral ward of Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England.Ewden Village is located between the Moor Hall and Broomhead reservoirs, close to and south of Bolsterstone, within the Civil Parish of Stocksbridge. Work on the construction of the two reservoirs was started by Sheffield Corporation in 1913. The reservoirs' construction site was served by the now closed Ewden Railway which connected with the Great Central Railway's Woodhead line in Wharncliffe Wood. A timber built village was constructed to house workers working on the Morehall and Broomhead reservoirs. The village was completed in 1929. By 1969 only 15 of over 70 buildings were occupied, and by the 21st century the village was practically abandoned. By 2008 a single worker's cottage remained from the original navvy village.Ewden Beck flows from Broomhead Moor, eastwards, supplying the Broomhead reservoir. Excess outfall flows into the River Don. Ewden Height is a local high point in the region at 375 m (1,230 ft).One the south side of the beck, upstream of the reservoirs and Ewden road bridge are prehistoric earthworks and other remains: there is a Bronze Age cemetery of around 30 round barrows, typically less than 3m diameter and 0.2 to 1 m (7.9 in to 3 ft 3.4 in) high, which are crossed by an earthwork 'Broomhead Dyke', around 1,200 m (3,900 ft) long, running roughly parallel to the beck; there is also a 20 m (66 ft) diameter ring cairn around 100m north of the cemetery.

Grubstones

The Grubstones (grid reference SE136447) is a stone circle on Burley Moor in West Yorkshire, England. It is believed to be either an embanked stone circle or a ring cairn.

List of Scheduled Monuments in Conwy

The Conwy County Borough is on the north coast of Wales, and has a heavily populated coastal strip. A third of the county is within the Snowdonia National Park. There are a total of 161 Scheduled Monuments in the county. 106 of these are Prehistoric, including at least 6 neolithic sites. Like much of Wales, there are large numbers of Bronze Age sites, particularly burial mounds, and some 40 Iron Age sites including hillforts and hut groups. There are just 3 Roman sites, and 6 Early medieval (Pre-Norman Conquest), all of which are early Christian monuments, including inscribed stones and a holy well. From the post-Norman medieval period, the castle and walls of Conwy itself are part of a World Heritage Site. There are numerous other fortified sites, along with lost villages, ruined chapels and a Bishop's palace amongst the 24 medieval sites. In the post-medieval period, there are 2 sites, including churches, bridges, lead mines and World War II defences. Conwy is made up of parts of the historic counties of Denbighshire and Caernarvonshire, which are covered respectively by the Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust (CPAT) and Gwyneth Archaeological Trust.

Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) have statutory protection. It is illegal to disturb the ground surface or any standing remains. The compilation of the list of sites is undertaken by Cadw Welsh Historic Monuments, which is an executive agency of the National Assembly of Wales. The list of scheduled monuments below is supplied by Cadw with additional material from RCAHMW and Clwyd-Powys and Gwynedd Archaeological Trusts.

List of Scheduled Monuments in Denbighshire

The county of Denbighshire is in north-east Wales, occupying the Vale of Clwyd and the uplands to the west, east and south. There are 168 Scheduled Monuments in the county. The oldest is from 225,000 years ago, the oldest inhabited site in Wales. A further 3 limestone cave systems also have Paleolithic deposits. Three chambered tombs date to the Neolithic. The moorlands in particular are home to many of the 100 Bronze Age and Iron Age, the vast majority of which are burial mounds. There are some 21 hill forts and other enclosure sites, and several stone circles. There are only 3 sites from the Roman period, and none dating to Early Medieval times. From the Medieval period itself on the other hand, there are 40 sites, including castles, town walls, chapels, crosses, domestic buildings, defensive buildings, bridges and monastic sites. There are 18 post-medieval sites, being a very diverse mix of site types and dates. Most notable is the World Heritage Site at Pontcysyllte Aqueduct. The modern county of Denbighshire bears only slight alignment with the historic county of the same name. The modern county includes parts of historic Merionethshire and Flintshire.

Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) have statutory protection. It is illegal to disturb the ground surface or any standing remains. The compilation of the list is undertaken by Cadw Welsh Historic Monuments, which is an executive agency of the National Assembly of Wales. The list of scheduled monuments below is supplied by Cadw with additional material from RCAHMW and Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust.

List of Scheduled Monuments in Merthyr Tydfil County Borough

Merthyr Tydfil County Borough has 43 Scheduled monuments. The prehistoric scheduled sites include many burial cairns and several defensive enclosures. The Roman period is represented by a Roman Road. The medieval periods include two inscribed stones, several house platforms and two castle sites. Finally the modern period has 14 sites, mainly related to Merthyr's industries, including coal mining, transportation and iron works. Almost all of Merthyr Tydfil was in the historic county of Glamorgan, with several of the northernmost sites having been in Brecknockshire.

Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) have statutory protection. The compilation of the list is undertaken by Cadw Welsh Historic Monuments, which is an executive agency of the National Assembly of Wales. The list of scheduled monuments below is supplied by Cadw with additional material from RCAHMW and Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust.

List of Scheduled Monuments in Rhondda Cynon Taf

Rhondda Cynon Taf is a County borough in South Wales. It has 89 Scheduled Monuments 7 of which cross or are on a border with a neighbouring authority. Of the 54 prehistoric sites, 40 are burial sites, with 4 hillforts and 10 domestic and hut circle sites. There are 3 Roman sites, all military in purpose, and a variety of medieval mottes, churches, houses and a bridge. The 17 post-medieval sites are various forms of industrial and transport related sites.

Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) have statutory protection. The compilation of the list is undertaken by Cadw Welsh Historic Monuments, which is an executive agency of the National Assembly of Wales. The list of scheduled monuments below is supplied by Cadw with additional material from RCAHMW and Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust.

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Carmarthenshire

Carmarthenshire is a large rural county in West Wales. It includes mix of upland and mountainous terrain and fertile farmland. The western end of the Brecon Beacons National Park lies within the county. Across Carmarthenshire there are a total of 370 Scheduled monuments, which is too many for a single list page. For convenience the list is divided into the 227 prehistoric sites (shown below) and the 143 Roman to modern sites. Included on this page are small number of stone chambered tombs from the Neolithic. There are a large and diverse variety of burial cairns, mounds and barrows, mainly from the Bronze Age, accounting for 197 sites. A further 49 Iron Age sites are mostly defensive sites such as hillforts and enclosures. Carmarthenshire is both a unitary authority and a historic county. Between 1974 and 1996 it was merged with Cardiganshire (now Ceredigion) and Pembrokeshire to form Dyfed.

All the Roman, early medieval, medieval and modern sites are listed at List of Scheduled Roman to modern Monuments in Carmarthenshire

Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) have statutory protection. It is illegal to disturb the ground surface or any standing remains. The compilation of the list is undertaken by Cadw Welsh Historic Monuments, which is an executive agency of the National Assembly of Wales. The list of scheduled monuments below is supplied by Cadw with additional material from RCAHMW and Dyfed Archaeological Trust.

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Ceredigion

Ceredigion is a large rural county in West Wales. It has a long coastline of Cardigan Bay to the west and the remote moorland of the Cambrian Mountains in the east, with the mountainous terrain of Plynlimon in the northeast. Ceredigion has a total of 264 Scheduled monuments. That is too many to have on a single list page, so for convenience the list is divided into the 163 prehistoric sites (shown below) and the 101 Roman to modern sites. Included on this page are 13 Neolithic and Bronze Age standing stones and 3 stone circles. There are a large and diverse variety of burial cairns, mounds and barrows, mainly from the Bronze Age and mainly on the eastern uplands, accounting for some 79 sites. A further 70 defensive Iron Age sites such as hillforts and enclosures are found across the county. Ceredigion is both a unitary authority and a historic county. Historically the county was called Cardiganshire. Between 1974 and 1996 it was merged with Carmarthenshire and Pembrokeshire to form Dyfed.

All the Roman, early medieval, medieval and modern sites are listed at List of Scheduled Roman to modern Monuments in Ceredigion

Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) have statutory protection. It is illegal to disturb the ground surface or any standing remains. The compilation of the list is undertaken by Cadw Welsh Historic Monuments, which is an executive agency of the National Assembly of Wales. The list of scheduled monuments below is supplied by Cadw with additional material from RCAHMW and Dyfed Archaeological Trust.

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Gwynedd (former Merionethshire)

Gwynedd is a large rural county in North Wales. The northern half includes the high mountains of Snowdonia and the mixed farmland and hills of the Llyn Peninsula, which between them make up the historic county of Caernarvonshire. The southern part of Gwynedd is the softer coastal and upland landscapes of the historic county of Merionethshire. Gwynedd, the second largest county in Wales, has a total of 497 Scheduled monuments. That is too many to have on a single list article, so for convenience the list is divided into three. The 171 prehistoric sites in historic Merionethshire (shown below), The 194 prehistoric sites in historic Caernarvonshire, and the 132 Roman to modern sites across the whole of Gwynedd. Over the whole of Gwynedd, there are 139 burial sites (67 on this list), including chambered tombs, cairns, mounds and barrows, dating from the Neolithic, Bronze Age, and Iron Age. A further 167 sites are 'Domestic' (64 on this list), mostly Iron Age hut circles and enclosures. As well as several field systems, there are 47 defensive sites (20 on this list) such as hillforts and promentary forts, again from the Iron Age. Gwynedd is a unitary authority comprising most of the two historic counties. In 1974 it also merged with Anglesey, and the merged county was also called Gwynedd. Since 1996 Anglesey has been a separate county again.

The northern prehistoric sites are listed at List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Gwynedd (former Caernarvonshire)

All 132 Roman, early medieval, medieval and modern sites for the whole of Gwynedd are listed at List of Scheduled Roman to modern Monuments in Gwynedd

Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) have statutory protection. It is illegal to disturb the ground surface or any standing remains. The compilation of the list is undertaken by Cadw Welsh Historic Monuments, which is an executive agency of the National Assembly of Wales. The list of scheduled monuments below is supplied by Cadw with additional material from RCAHMW and Gwynedd Archaeological Trust.

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Powys (Brecknockshire)

Powys is the largest administrative county in Wales. With over a quarter of Wales's land area, and covering much of the eastern half of the country, it is a county of remote uplands, low population and no coastline. It was created in more or less its current form in 1974, and is the only one of the large county units created at that time to have been carried forward intact at the 1996 local government re-organisation. It comprises three historic counties, namely Montgomeryshire, Radnorshire, and most of Brecknockshire. There are 950 Scheduled monuments within the county, which is far more than can be sensibly covered in one list. Each of the 3 historic counties is therefore listed separately, and each of these has two lists - one for the prehistoric sites and one for the Roman, medieval and post-medieval sites.

This list shows the many prehistoric sites in Brecknockshire (also historically known as Breconshire, and not including those parts that are no longer in Powys). Brecknockshire is the southern third of Powys, and encompasses the Brecon Beacons National Park, the Black Mountains and Mynydd Epynt. The River Wye separates it from Radnorshire, and Montgomeryshire forms the northern third of Powys. There are 254 prehistoric scheduled monuments in the Brecknockshire area. Of these, 12 are neolithic burial sites. An extraordinary 190 are likely to date from the Bronze age, mainly burial sites of various sorts but also including 44 standing stones, stones circles and stone alignments. There are 52 Iron Age hillforts, defensive and other enclosures including settlements and hut sites.

The lists of Scheduled Monuments in Powys are as follows:-

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Powys (Brecknockshire) (254 sites - shown below)

List of Scheduled Roman to modern Monuments in Powys (Brecknockshire) (135 sites)

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Powys (Radnorshire) (139 sites)

List of Scheduled Roman to modern Monuments in Powys (Radnorshire) (119 sites)

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Powys (Montgomeryshire) (190 sites)

List of Scheduled Roman to modern Monuments in Powys (Montgomeryshire) (113 sites)Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) have statutory protection. It is illegal to disturb the ground surface or any standing remains. The compilation of the list is undertaken by Cadw Welsh Historic Monuments, which is an executive agency of the National Assembly of Wales. The list of scheduled monuments below is supplied by Cadw with additional material from RCAHMW and Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust.

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Powys (Montgomeryshire)

Powys is the largest administrative county in Wales. With over a quarter of Wales's land area, and covering much of the eastern half of the country, it is a county of remote uplands, low population and no coastline. It was created in more or less its current form in 1974, and is the only one of the large county units created at that time to have been carried forward intact at the 1996 local government re-organisation. It comprises three historic counties, namely Montgomeryshire, Radnorshire, and most of Brecknockshire. There are 950 Scheduled monuments within the county, which is far more than can be sensibly covered in one list. Each of the 3 historic counties is therefore listed separately, and each of these has two lists - one for the prehistoric sites and one for the Roman, medieval and post-medieval sites.

This list shows the many prehistoric sites in Montgomeryshire, the northern third of Powys. Of the 303 Scheduled Monuments in the Montgomeryshire area 190 date to prehistoric periods. Of these, only two are known to be Neolithic. A remarkable 117 are likely to date from the Bronze age, mainly burial sites of various sorts but also including 23 standing stones, stones circles and stone alignments. There are 70 Iron Age hillforts, defensive enclosures and hut sites.

The lists of Scheduled Monuments in Powys are as follows:-

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Powys (Brecknockshire) (254 sites)

List of Scheduled Roman to modern Monuments in Powys (Brecknockshire) (135 sites)

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Powys (Radnorshire) (139 sites)

List of Scheduled Roman to modern Monuments in Powys (Radnorshire) (119 sites)

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Powys (Montgomeryshire) (190 sites - shown below)

List of Scheduled Roman to modern Monuments in Powys (Montgomeryshire) (113 sites)Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) have statutory protection. It is illegal to disturb the ground surface or any standing remains. The compilation of the list is undertaken by Cadw Welsh Historic Monuments, which is an executive agency of the National Assembly of Wales. The list of scheduled monuments below is supplied by Cadw with additional material from RCAHMW and Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust.

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Powys (Radnorshire)

Powys is the largest administrative county in Wales. With an over a quarter of Wales's land area, covering much of the eastern half of the country, it is a county of remote uplands, low population and no coastline. It was created in more or less its current form in 1974, and is the only one of the large county units created at that time to have been carried forward intact at the 1996 local government re-organisation. It comprises three historic counties, namely Montgomeryshire, Radnorshire, and most of Brecknockshire. There are 950 Scheduled monuments within the county, which is far more than can be sensibly covered in one list. Each of the 3 historic counties is therefore listed separately, and each of these has two lists - one for the prehistoric sites and one for the Roman, medieval and post-medieval sites.

This list shows the prehistoric sites in Radnorshire, which occupies the central third of Powys. The River Wye separates it from Brecknockorshire to the south, and Montgomeryshire forms the northern third of Powys. There are 139 prehistoric scheduled monuments in the Radnorshire area. Of these, only two are neolithic burial sites. An extraordinary 117 are likely to date from the Bronze age, mainly burial sites of various sorts but also including a cup-marked stone, 11 stone circles and stone alignments, and 17 standing stones. There are 20 Iron Age hillforts, defensive and other enclosures.

The lists of Scheduled Monuments in Powys are as follows:-

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Powys (Brecknockshire) (254 sites)

List of Scheduled Roman to modern Monuments in Powys (Brecknockshire) (135 sites)

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Powys (Radnorshire) (139 sites - shown below)

List of Scheduled Roman to modern Monuments in Powys (Radnorshire) (119 sites)

List of Scheduled prehistoric Monuments in Powys (Montgomeryshire) (190 sites)

List of Scheduled Roman to modern Monuments in Powys (Montgomeryshire) (113 sites)Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) have statutory protection. It is illegal to disturb the ground surface or any standing remains. The compilation of the list is undertaken by Cadw Welsh Historic Monuments, which is an executive agency of the National Assembly of Wales. The list of scheduled monuments below is supplied by Cadw with additional material from RCAHMW and Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust.

Showery Tor

Showery Tor is a rocky outcrop on a ridge-top approximately 0.6 kilometres (0.37 mi) north of the Rough Tor summit, near Camelford on Bodmin Moor in Cornwall. It is notable for its rock formations and prehistoric monuments.The Tor is a prominent landmark for a wide area. It consists of a natural outcrop enveloped by a giant man-made ring cairn and was thought to have been a religious focal point. Craig Weatherhill in "Cornovia: Ancient Sites of Cornwall & Scilly" calls it "A natural formation of weathered granite, 5 metres (16 ft) high ...is surrounded by a massive ring cairn of piled stone 30 metres (98 ft) in diameter and up to 1.2 metres (3.9 ft) high. The natural formation was evidently intended as a focal point. No excavations have been recorded at this site, so it is not known how many, if any, burials were associated with this presumably Neolithic or Bronze Age site" Christopher Tilley has estimated the height of the cairn on which the outcrop stands to be 3 metres (9.8 ft). The granite outcrop is reminiscent of the Cheesewring and made of individual blocks on underlying outcrops formed by erosion along horizontal fractures in the granitic mass. Aerial photography has revealed more about the layout of the structures on Showery Tor and it stands out as the only natural formation to have been used in this way by the cairn designers.

Strichen Stone Circle

Strichen Stone Circle is a small Megalithic stone circle located in the north east of Scotland, near Strichen, Aberdeenshire.

Strichen Stone Circle stands on a hill near Strichen House. In 1773 it was visited by James Boswell and Samuel Johnson, as the lexicographer was interested in seeing a "druid's temple". They found only the recumbent stone with its flankers, and one other stone. The arrangement was completely destroyed around 1830, and again, after reconstruction, in 1960. On both occasions the stones were completely removed. On one occasion the stones were removed by a tenant farmer who was ordered to replace then by his landlord. The site was excavated in 1975, and again in 1980-82 when the circle was re-erected.

The circle contains the remains of a ruined ring-cairn. Excavation finds have included a cremation and urn, a cup-marked stone, and a damaged cist. The stony bank around the circle was found to have been strewn with quartz chippings. Within the ring of the present day circle, there were what appeared to be the postholes of an earlier timber ring. The recumbent measures about 2.6 metres (8.5 ft) in length by 1.05 metres (3.4 ft) in height and is situated on the south-south-east of the ring.

Between 1980 and 1982 reconstruction stones were located in the original stoneholes and their height grading was recreated. It is uncertain, however, that each stone was returned to its original position. By 1999 one of the stones re-erected in 1982 had fallen over.

Sunhoney

Sunhoney is a stone circle of the recumbent type, which is common in the Grampian region, in particular at the River Dee. Sunhoney is situated about 2 km west of Echt in Aberdeenshire.

The diameter is about 25 m and is formed by 11 Stone of red granite or gneiss. When looking above the laying stone of grey granite the horizon of the hills to the south can be seen. The laying stone seems to have tumbled, its surface is covered with 31 cup marks, thought to be markers of where the major standstill moon rises or sets. Inside the circle is a ring cairn, which was added later. At the excavation in 1865 remains of cremations were discovered.

Another recumbent stone circle is about 2 km to the west, near the church of Midmar Kirk.

The site has been designated a scheduled ancient monument.

Worsthorne-with-Hurstwood

Worsthorne-with-Hurstwood is a civil parish in the borough of Burnley, in Lancashire, England. It is situated on the eastern outskirts of Burnley.

The parish contains part of the Pike Hill suburb of Burnley, the village of Worsthorne and the hamlets of Brownside and Hurstwood and the rural area east of the town.

The parish adjoins the Burnley parishes of Briercliffe and Cliviger, the unparished area of Burnley and West Yorkshire.

A Bronze Age round cairn and bowl barrow are located on Hameldon Pasture, with a ring cairn nearby on Slipper Hill. The remains of two Romano-British farmsteads known as Ring Stones camp is also in the area. All are protected as Scheduled monuments. Traces of a Roman road have been reported heading north-west from Ring Stones.Worsthorne-with-Hurstwood was once a township in the ancient parish of Whalley. This became a civil parish in 1866, forming part of the Burnley Rural District from 1894.During World War II a Starfish site bombing decoy was constructed off Gorple Road to the east of Worsthorne, part of a network designed to protect Accrington. Also a B-24 Liberator from the 491st Bombardment Group USAAF crashed on Black Hameldon in February 1945.According to the United Kingdom Census 2011, the parish has a population of 2,963, a decrease from 2,986 in the 2001 census.Hurstwood and Cant Clough reservoirs are in the south-east of the parish, both are passed by the Mary Towneley Loop section of the Pennine Bridleway National Trail and the Burnley Way footpath. Swinden and Lea Green reservoirs are in the north on the boundary with Briercliffe.

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