Rider (imprint)

Rider is a publishing imprint of Ebury Publishing, a Penguin Random House division. The list was started by William Rider & Son in Britain in 1908 when he took over the occult publisher Phillip Wellby. The editorial director of the new list was Ralph Shirley and under his direction, they began to publish titles as varied as the Rider-Waite tarot deck and Bram Stoker's Dracula.

Today the Rider motto is "New Ideas for New Ways of Living" and books and authors on the list reflects this. There are still books on the paranormal, with authors like Raymond Moody and Colin Fry; on astral projection with authors Sylvan Muldoon and Hereward Carrington; and spirituality, with books by the Dalai Lama and Jack Kornfield; but there are also books on current and international affairs by authors as diverse as Nobel Prize-winners Archbishop Desmond Tutu and Shirin Ebadi.

Rider
Parent companyPenguin Random House
Founded1908
FounderWilliam Rider & Son
Country of originUnited Kingdom
Headquarters locationLondon
Publication typesbooks

External links

Bibliography

  • Karlfried Graf Dürckheim
  • Jonathan Yardley, States of Mind: A Personal Journey Through the Mid-Atlantic, 1993, ISBN 0-394-58911-4
  • Cyril Scott, The Boy Who Saw True, 1953
  • Tony Hogan, Born to Heal, 2002
  • Gerald Gardner, Witchcraft Today, 1954
Beyond Terror

Beyond Terror: The Truth About the Real Threats to Our World is a book by Chris Abbott, Paul Rogers and John Sloboda of Oxford Research Group, a UK-based think tank. It is a 120-page paperback published by the Rider imprint of Random House in April 2007.

David Charles Manners

David Charles Manners (born 1965) is a British writer published in four languages. He is a representative for the charity Diversity Role Models, and the co-founder of Sarvashubhamkara, a charity that provides medical care, education and human contact to socially excluded individuals and communities on the Indian subcontinent, most of whom are affected by the stigma of leprosy.

E. P. Dutton

E. P. Dutton was an American book publishing company founded as a book retailer in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1852 by Edward Payson Dutton.

Hansa Yogendra

Dr. Hansa Yogendra (born 1947) is an Indian yoga guru, author and researcher and TV personality. She is director of The Yoga Institute in Mumbai, founded by her father-in-law Shri Yogendra. It is a government recognized non-profit organization and the oldest organized yoga center in the world, founded in 1918.She was TV presenter of the television series Yoga for Better Living, aired on DD National in 1980s.

She is chairperson of Yoga Certification Committee for Quality Council of India (QCI) and President of International Board of Yoga. She also serves as Vice President of the Indian Yoga Association.

One-child policy

China's one-child policy was part of a birth planning program designed to control the size of its population. Distinct from the family planning policies of most other countries (which focus on providing contraceptive options to help women have the number of children they want), it set a limit on the number of children parents could have, the world's most extreme example of population planning. It was introduced in 1979 (after a decade-long two-child policy), modified in the mid 1980s to allow rural parents a second child if the first was a daughter, and then lasted three more decades before being eliminated at the end of 2015. The policy also allowed exceptions for some other groups, including ethnic minorities. The term one-child policy is thus a misnomer, because for nearly 30 of the 36 years that it existed (1979–2015) about half of all parents in China were allowed to have a second child.

Provincial governments could, and did, require the use of contraception, sterilizations and abortions to ensure compliance, and imposed enormous fines for violations. Local and national governments created commissions to raise awareness and carry out registration and inspection work. China also rewards families with only one child. From 1982 onwards, in accordance with the instructions on further family planning issued by the CPC central committee and the state council in that year, regulations awarded 5 yuan per month for only children. Parents who had one child would also get a “one-child glory certificate”.According to the Chinese government, 400 million births were prevented, starting from 1970, a decade before the start of the one child policy. Some scholars have disputed this claim, with Martin King Whyte and Wang et al contending that the policy had little effect on population growth or the size of the total population. China has been compared to countries with similar socioeconomic development like Thailand and Iran, along with the Indian states of Kerala and Tamil Nadu, which achieved similar declines of fertility without a one-child policy. However, a recent demographic study challenged these scholars by showing that China's low fertility was achieved two or three decades earlier than would be expected given its level of development, and that more than 500 million births were prevented between 1970 and 2015 (a calculation based on an alternate model of fertility decline proposed by the scholars themselves), some 400 million of which may have been due to one-child restrictions. In addition, by 2060 China's birth planning policies may have averted as many as 1 billion people in China when one adds in all the eliminated descendants of the births originally averted by the policies. Although 76% of Chinese people said that they supported the policy in a 2008 survey, it was controversial outside of China.Effective from January 2016, the national birth planning policy became a universal two-child policy that allowed each couple to have two children.

The First and Last Freedom

The First and Last Freedom is a book by 20th-century Indian philosopher Jiddu Krishnamurti (1895–1986). Originally published 1954 with a comprehensive foreword by Aldous Huxley, it was instrumental in broadening Krishnamurti’s audience and exposing his ideas. It was one of the first Krishnamurti titles in the world of mainstream, commercial publishing, where its success helped establish him as a viable author. The book also established a format frequently used in later Krishnamurti publications, in which he presents his ideas on various interrelated issues, followed by discussions with one or more participants. As of 2015 the work had had several editions in print and digital media.

Vera Stanley Alder

Vera Dorothea Stanley Alder (29 October 1898 – 26 May 1984) was an English portrait painter and mystic. She wrote several books and pamphlets on self-help and spirituality. She founded the World Guardian Fellowship.

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