Richie Ashburn

Donald Richard Ashburn (March 19, 1927 – September 9, 1997), also known by the nicknames, "Putt-Putt", "The Tilden Flash", and "Whitey" (due to his light-blond hair), was an American center fielder in Major League Baseball. (Some sources give his full middle name as "Richie".) He was born in Tilden, Nebraska. From his youth on a farm, he grew up to become a professional outfielder and veteran broadcaster for the Philadelphia Phillies and one of the most beloved sports figures in Philadelphia history. He was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1995.

Richie Ashburn
Richie Ashburn 1953
Ashburn around 1953
Center fielder
Born: March 19, 1927
Tilden, Nebraska
Died: September 9, 1997 (aged 70)
New York City, New York
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 20, 1948, for the Philadelphia Phillies
Last MLB appearance
September 30, 1962, for the New York Mets
MLB statistics
Batting average.308
Hits2,574
Home runs29
Runs batted in586
Teams
Career highlights and awards
Member of the National
Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Baseball Hall of Fame Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg
Induction1995
Election MethodVeteran's Committee

Playing career

One of the famous "Whiz Kids" of the National League champion 1950 Phillies, Ashburn spent 12 of his 15 major-league seasons as the Phillies' center fielder (from 1948 through 1959). He sported a .308 lifetime batting average, leading the National League twice, and routinely led the league in fielding percentage. In 1950, in the last game of the regular season, he threw Dodgers' runner Cal Abrams out at home plate to preserve a 1–1 tie and set the stage for Dick Sisler's pennant-clinching home run. He had been playing in to back up a pick-off throw on a pitchout, but pitcher Robin Roberts had instead thrown a fastball to the batter, Duke Snider.[1]

The following year Ashburn displayed his fielding skill on the national stage in the All-Star Game at Tiger Stadium in Detroit. The Associated Press reported, "Richie Ashburn, fleet footed Philadelphia Phillies outfielder, brought the huge Briggs Stadium crowd of 52,075 to its feet with a brilliant leaping catch in the sixth inning to rob Vic Wertz of a near homer. Ashburn caught the ball in front of the right centerfield screen 400 feet distant after a long run."[2] He was also the last Phillies player to collect eight hits in a double-header when he singled eight times in a twinbill at Pittsburgh on May 20, 1951.

Ashburn was a singles hitter rather than a slugger, accumulating over 2,500 hits in 15 years against only 29 home runs. In his day he was regarded as the archetypal "spray hitter", stroking the ball equally well to all fields, thus making him harder to defend against. Ashburn accumulated the most hits (1,875) of any batter during the 1950s.[3]

During an August 17, 1957 game Ashburn hit a foul ball into the stands that struck spectator Alice Roth, wife of Philadelphia Bulletin sports editor Earl Roth, breaking her nose. When play resumed Ashburn fouled off another ball that struck her while she was being carried off in a stretcher.[4] Ashburn and Mrs. Roth maintained a friendship for many years, and the Roths' son later served as a Phillies batboy.

Richie Ashburn plaque
Ashburn's plaque from the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame

Ashburn was traded to the Chicago Cubs following the 1959 season for three players. He went on to anchor center field for the North Siders in 1960 and 1961. Anticipating a future career behind a microphone, Ashburn sometimes conducted a post-game baseball instruction clinic at Wrigley Field for the benefit of the youngsters in the WGN-TV viewing audience.

Ashburn was purchased by the expansion New York Mets for the 1962 season. He had a good year offensively, batting .306, and was the team's first-ever All-Star Game representative. It was, however, a frustrating year for the polished professional, who had begun his career with a winner and found himself playing for the least successful team in modern baseball history (with a record of 40–120). He retired at the end of the season.

One oft-told story is that on short flies to center or left-center, center fielder Ashburn would collide with shortstop Elio Chacón. Chacón, from Venezuela, spoke little English and had difficulty understanding when Ashburn was calling him off the ball. To remedy matters teammate Joe Christopher taught Ashburn to say "Yo la tengo", Spanish for "I’ve got it." When Ashburn first used this phrase it worked fine, keeping Chacón from running into him. But then left fielder Frank Thomas, who did not speak a word of Spanish, slammed into Ashburn. After getting up Thomas asked Ashburn, "What the heck is a Yellow Tango?" This anecdote inspired the name of the American indie rock group Yo La Tengo.

In his last five seasons Ashburn played for the 8th-place Phillies, the 7th-place Cubs, and the 10th place Mets. The infamous first-year Mets club won only a quarter of its games, and Ashburn decided to retire from active play. The last straw might have been during the Mets' 120th loss, when Ashburn was one of the three Mets victims in a triple play pulled off by his former teammates, the 9th-place Cubs. According to Jimmy Breslin, it was the prospect of sitting on the bench that led Ashburn to retire: "He sat on the bench for a while with another team once and it bothered him badly. And he said that if he ever had to be a benchwarmer for the New York Mets he'd commit suicide."[5]

Throughout his playing career, Ashburn, who lived in his hometown of Tilden during the offseason, officiated high school basketball games throughout Nebraska as a way to stay in playing condition. He became a well-respected official, but retired from officiating when he retired from baseball.

Post-career and death

Phillies Dodgers 2017 06
Richie Ashburn statue at Citizens Bank Park

Starting in 1963 Ashburn became a radio and TV color commentator for his original big-league team, the Phillies. He first worked with long-time Phillies announcers Bill Campbell and Byrum Saam. In 1971 Campbell was released by the Phillies and Harry Kalas joined the team. Ashburn worked with two future Ford C. Frick Award winners, Saam and Kalas, for the next few years. Saam retired in 1976, and Ashburn continued working with Kalas for the next two decades, the two becoming best friends. Kalas often referred to Ashburn as "His Whiteness", a nickname Kalas would use for the rest of his life for the man he openly adored.[6]

Ashburn also regularly wrote for The Philadelphia Bulletin and, later, The Philadelphia Daily News.

According to his mother, Ashburn planned on retiring from broadcasting at the end of the 1997 season. He died of a heart attack at age 70 on September 9, 1997, in New York City after broadcasting a Phillies-Mets game at Shea Stadium.[7] A large crowd of fans paid tribute to him, passing by his coffin in Memorial Hall, located in Philadelphia's Fairmount Park. He is interred in the Gladwyne Methodist Church Cemetery, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania.

Awards and honors

Ashburn
Richie Ashburn banner in Ashburn Alley, Citizens Bank Park

Ashburn was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame by the Hall's Veterans Committee in 1995 after a long fan campaign to induct him, which included bumper stickers that read, "Richie Ashburn: Why The Hall Not?"[8] He accompanied Phillies great Mike Schmidt, who was inducted in the same ceremony. Over 25,000 fans, mostly from Philadelphia, traveled to Cooperstown for the ceremony.

PhilsAshburn
The Phillies retired Richie Ashburn's number in 1979.

Ashburn was inducted into The Broadcast Pioneers of Philadelphia Hall of Fame in 1997.

Ashburn was posthumously inducted into the inaugural class of the Philadelphia Sports Hall of Fame in 2004.[9]

Each year the Phillies present the Richie Ashburn Special Achievement Award to "a member of the organization who has demonstrated loyalty, dedication and passion for the game."[10]

The center-field entertainment area at the Phillies current stadium, Citizens Bank Park, was named "Ashburn Alley" in his honor after numerous fans urged the Phillies to name their new stadium after Ashburn (Ashburn's 47 seasons of service to the Phillies organization was second in length in Philadelphia baseball history only to Connie Mack, who was so honored by the renaming of Shibe Park in 1953).

At Citizens Bank Park, the Phillies' radio-broadcast booth is named "The Richie 'Whitey' Ashburn Broadcast Booth". It is directly next to the TV-broadcast booth, which was renamed "The Harry Kalas Broadcast Booth" after Kalas's death in 2009.

Miscellaneous

Richie Ashburn
Ashburn's 1952 Bowman Gum baseball card.

Ashburn was well known for his dry humor as a broadcaster. On one occasion he was talking to Harry Kalas about his superstitions during his playing days. He said that he once had a habit of keeping a successful baseball bat in bed with him between games, not trusting the clubhouse crew to give him the same bat the next day. Ashburn told Kalas that he had "slept with a lot of old bats" in his day.[11]

When calling late innings, Ashburn would occasionally ask on-air if the staff of Celebre's Pizza, a nearby pizzeria in South Philly, was listening to the radio. Pizza would then arrive at the radio booth 15–20 minutes later. The Phillies requested that Ashburn discontinue the practice, as Celebre's was not a Phillies sponsor, and it was considered free advertising.

Ashburn was allowed to make on-air birthday and anniversary wishes during Phillies games. To circumvent the Phillies' request he started to say, "I'd like to send out a special birthday wish to the Celebre's twins – Plain & Pepperoni!"[12] Harry Kalas was heard on radio in 2007 making a similar wish.

Rubén Amaro, Jr., former general manager of the Phillies and son and namesake of Rubén Amaro, Sr., Phillies shortstop from the sixties and coach, co-founded the Richie Ashburn Foundation, which provides free baseball camp for 1,100 underprivileged children in the Delaware Valley and awards grants to area schools and colleges.

Ted Williams gave Ashburn the nickname "Putt-Putt" because he "ran so fast you would think he had twin motors in his pants". The origin of the nickname also has been attributed to Stan Musial.

The book, "Richie Ashburn: Why The Hall Not?", is about Richie's journey to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

See also

References

  1. ^ Breslin, Jimmy, Can't Anybody Here Play This Game? (The Viking Press, 1963), p. 103
  2. ^ "Jubilant Nationals See End of American Loop 'Reign of Terror'". Ellensburg Daily Record. July 11, 1951. p. 8.
  3. ^ "Batting Season Finder – Baseball-Reference PI". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on May 9, 2008. Retrieved August 17, 2008.
  4. ^ Nash, Bruce; Zullo, Alan. Baseball Hall of Shame 3. New York: Pocket Books. 1988. p. 13. ISBN 0-671-68147-8.
  5. ^ Breslin, Jimmy, Can't Anybody Here Play This Game? (The Viking Press, 1963), p. 54
  6. ^ Baseball-Reference.com bio page on Ashburn, cites Kalas nickname Retrieved 2010-08-06
  7. ^ Fitzpatrick, Frank (September 10, 1997). "A Phillie For the Ages, Richie Ashburn Dies". Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A1. Mr. Ashburn, 70, had performed his normal duties during the Phillies' 13–4 win Monday night...Back in his room at midtown Manhattan's Grand Hyatt hotel, he contacted the Phillies' traveling secretary, Eddie Ferenz, and complained of chest pains. Ferenz summoned team trainer Jeff Cooper, but Mr. Ashburn was dead, apparently of a heart attack, by the time they entered his room about 5 am
  8. ^ Google Books reference to "Richie Ashburn Remembered" book with reference Retrieved 2010-08-10
  9. ^ "Philadelphia Sports Hall of Fame Inductees". Retrieved August 3, 2009.
  10. ^ McKee, Don (November 28, 2011). "Jerry Clothier, Phillies vice president for business and finance". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved November 28, 2011.
  11. ^ Book excerpt on Google.com Retrieved July 15, 2010
  12. ^ ESPN.com article mentioning Celebre's Pizza Retrieved 2010-08-05

External links

1951 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1951 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 18th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 10, 1951, at Briggs Stadium in Detroit, Michigan the home of the Detroit Tigers of the American League. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 8–3.

1958 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1958 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 25th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 8, 1958, at Memorial Stadium in Baltimore, Maryland, the home of the Baltimore Orioles of the American League.

This was the first Major League Baseball All-Star Game without an extra base hit.For this Diamond Jubilee game, the opening pitch was made by U.S. Vice President Richard Nixon, who was to become President 10 years later. The attendance was 48,829. The game was broadcast on the NBC television and radio networks.

The first hit of the game was by legendary center fielder Willie Mays. The last scoring came in the sixth inning when the American League team took the lead after an error by third baseman Frank Thomas led to a single by Gil McDougald. Early Wynn was the winning pitcher as the American League scored a 4-3 victory.

Several players were named to the team but did not get into the game. These included Billy Pierce, Tony Kubek, Harvey Kuenn, Sherm Lollar, Rocky Bridges, Ryne Duren, Whitey Ford, and Elston Howard for the American League. For the National League team, Johnny Antonelli, Richie Ashburn, George Crowe, Eddie Mathews, Don McMahon, Walt Moryn, Johnny Podres, Bob Purkey, and Bob Schmidt were on the roster but did not play.

The next All-Star Game to be played in Baltimore was in 1993; that edition was aired on both CBS TV and radio, and played in Oriole Park at Camden Yards, with a special commemoration of this game's 35th anniversary.

1995 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1995 introduced a system of multiple classified ballots for consideration by the Veterans Committee. That group met in closed sessions as usual and selected four people:

Richie Ashburn, Leon Day, William Hulbert, and Vic Willis. Day and Hulbert were named from the new ballots for Negro Leagues and 19th century figures.

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players

(no change) and elected Mike Schmidt.

1996 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1996 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 67th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 9, 1996, at Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia, the home of the Philadelphia Phillies of the National League. This marked the fifteenth and final all star game appearance of Ozzie Smith, who retired after the 1996 season. Smith entered the game in the top of the sixth inning. His first at-bat was greeted by chants of "Oz-zie, Oz-zie" from the Philadelphia crowd. Iron Man Cal Ripken, Jr., who was in the midst of his record-breaking run of consecutive games played, broke his nose during the pre-game AL team picture. However, he was ready to go at game time and started at SS.

During the pregame ceremonies, Kelsey Grammer of Frasier sang the American National Anthem and Canadian singer Sarah McLachlan sang the Canadian National Anthem. U.S. Congressman Jim Bunning (who was elected to the baseball hall-of-fame in 1996) joined other Phillies' hall of fame alumni Mike Schmidt, Steve Carlton, Richie Ashburn and Robin Roberts in tossing the ceremonial first pitches.

Joe Carter, the Toronto Blue Jays representative to the All-Star Game, received boos from the crowd for his home run that ended the 1993 World Series.The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 6–0. The National League would not win another All-Star Game until 2010.

Then-Chairman of the Executive Committee Bud Selig presented the All-Star Game MVP Award to Mike Piazza. Bobby Brown had presented the MVP Award in 1993, while National League President Len Coleman had presented the award in 1994 and 1995. After presenting the MVP Award at the 1998 Major League Baseball All-Star Game, Selig was officially named Commissioner of Baseball.

This is the only All-Star Game in which not a single pitcher walked a batter; appropriately, Braves closer Mark Wohlers was the final pitcher of the game.

Veterans Stadium also held the "distinction" of being the most recent host stadium to be closed down, a distinction it lost after Yankee Stadium closed at the conclusion of the 2008 season. This is also, as of the end of the 2017 MLB season, the last MLB All-Star Game to be played on artificial turf (there are now only two MLB stadiums with artificial turf, but both are of the next-generation variety).

Andy Musser

Andrew J. Musser, Jr. (December 28, 1937 – January 22, 2012) was an American sportscaster. He is best known for his time as a play-by-play announcer for Philadelphia Phillies baseball from 1976 to 2001.Born in Lemoyne, Pennsylvania, he grew up in nearby Harrisburg. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in communications from Syracuse University in 1959.He was part of a team, with Richie Ashburn and Harry Kalas, which broadcast Phillies games on both radio and television for 21 consecutive seasons from 1976 to 1997. He retired after the 2001 season.

Musser worked for WCAU radio and television in Philadelphia from 1965 to 1971. During this time, he served as the radio play-by-play announcer for the Eagles football as well as 76ers and Villanova Wildcats basketball. One of the youngest lead broadcasters in the National Football League at the time, he covered the Eagles games with Charlie Gauer for four years until the station lost the broadcast rights to WIP in 1969. Musser also called various events for CBS Radio, including Super Bowl VI and Super Bowl VIII.

Musser was the lead voice for Chicago Bulls telecasts on WSNS from 1973 through 1976, pairing with Dick Gonski in the first two seasons and Lorn Brown in the third. Musser would call New York Knicks games with Cal Ramsey on WOR-TV (away) and Manhattan Cable Television (home) for the next four seasons from 1976 to 1980. He handled all the matches in the first three years, but only the home ones in the fourth.Musser was married for 50 years to Eun Joo. They had two children, Allan and Luanne, and four grandchildren. Musser died on January 22, 2012.The Broadcast Pioneers of Philadelphia [1] inducted Musser into their Hall of Fame in 2011.

Ashburn Alley

Ashburn Alley is the open concourse behind center field at Citizens Bank Park, home of the Philadelphia Phillies. It is named after Hall of Famer Richie Ashburn, Phillies center fielder from 1948 to 1959, and was also a long time broadcaster for the Phillies from 1963 until his death in September 1997. Ashburn Alley spans from the left field gate to "The Yard" kids area, and features a "street-fair" like atmosphere before and during a game.Ashburn Alley's name sake began while Ashburn was still playing. During the Phillies playing days at old Shibe Park, Ashburn was known for dropping bunts down the third baseline, which had slightly overgrown grass that helped the ball stay fair. A bronze statue of Ashburn lies in the center of the alley.

Chuck Brodsky

Chuck Brodsky (born May 20, 1960 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American musician and singer-songwriter currently living in Asheville, North Carolina. He is particularly known for his often humorous and political lyrics, as well as his songs about baseball, such as "The Ballad of Eddie Klep", "Moe Berg: The Song", and "Doc Ellis' No-No". On his 2004 album Color Came One Day, he took on pollution in "Seven Miles Upwind", the destruction of independent business and regional culture by multinational corporations in "Trees Falling", and the abridgement of civil liberties associated with Bush administration policies in "Dangerous Times".

His song "Radio" was featured in the film Radio. His most recent release is Tell Tale Heart (2015). Another song, called "Bill and Annie", was featured in episode 3 of the podcast "Welcome to Night Vale", made by Commonplace Books. Several of his songs have appeared in films and documentaries on ESPN, NPR, NFL Films, PBS, and ABC's "Good Morning America," and the Dr. Demento show. "Moe Berg: The Song" is featured in the film “Jews and Baseball: An American Love Story.”

"Whitey & Harry" is featured in “A Baseball Life” (Produced by The Philadelphia Phillies about Richie Ashburn).

Elio Chacón

Elio Chacón Rodríguez (October 26, 1936 – April 24, 1992) was a Major League Baseball second baseman and shortstop who played in the National League from 1960 to 1962. He was the seventh baseball player from Venezuela to play in the majors.

Chacón batted .265 as a reserve second baseman with the NL Champion Cincinnati Reds of 1961. In game two of that World Series, Chacón hit a key bloop single against New York Yankees pitcher Ralph Terry, and scored the winning run in the Reds' only victory in the series.

During the 1962 season, New York Mets center fielder Richie Ashburn and Elio Chacón found themselves colliding in the outfield. When Ashburn went for a catch, he would scream, "I got it! I got it!" only to run into the 160-pound Chacón, who spoke only Spanish. Ashburn learned to yell, "¡Yo la tengo! ¡Yo la tengo!" which is "I've got it" in Spanish. In a later game, Ashburn happily saw Chacón backing off. He relaxed, positioned himself to catch the ball, and was instead run over by 200-pound left fielder Frank Thomas, who understood no Spanish and had missed a team meeting that proposed using the words "¡Yo la tengo!" as a way to avoid outfield collisions. After getting up, Thomas asked Ashburn, "What the hell is a Yellow Tango?". The band, Yo La Tengo, gets its name from this baseball anecdote.On October 10, 1961, an expansion draft to stock the Houston Colt .45s and New York Mets new National League clubs was conducted in Cincinnati. Chacón was the Mets' first candidate for the starting shortstop job. In May 28 game, Chacón got in a fight with Willie Mays. Chacón was ejected from the game. He led the club in stolen bases in the inaugural season of 1962, but then never appeared in the major leagues again.

Chacón was a .232 career hitter with four home runs, 28 RBI, 49 runs, and 20 stolen bases in 228 games played.

Elio Chacón died in Caracas, Venezuela, at the age of 55.

Harry Kalas

Harold Norbert Kalas (March 26, 1936 – April 13, 2009) was an American sportscaster, best known for his Ford C. Frick Award-winning role as lead play-by-play announcer for Major League Baseball's Philadelphia Phillies, a position he held from 1971 until his death in 2009.

Kalas was also closely identified with the National Football League, serving as a voice-over narrator for NFL Films productions (a regular feature on Inside the NFL) and calling football games nationally for Westwood One radio.

Kalas collapsed in the Washington Nationals' broadcast booth on April 13, 2009, about an hour before a Phillies game was scheduled to begin against the Nationals, and died soon afterward.

Jim Woods (baseball)

James Jerome Woods (born September 17, 1939), nicknamed "Woody", is an American former professional baseball player. He played parts of three seasons in Major League Baseball, primarily as a third baseman. He threw and batted right-handed and during his playing career was measured at 6 feet (1.8 m) tall and 175 pounds (79 kg).

Woods' eight-year (1957–64) professional career included parts of three seasons with the Chicago Cubs (1957) and Philadelphia Phillies (1960–61), but he spent portions or all of those eight seasons toiling in minor league baseball. In the majors, he appeared in 36 games, collecting 17 hits, including three doubles and three home runs.Woods was included in a notable trade between the Cubs and Phillies on January 11, 1960, when he was packaged with veteran shortstop Alvin Dark and pitcher John Buzhardt in a trade for the Phillies' veteran center fielder (and future Hall of Famer) Richie Ashburn.

List of Major League Baseball career putouts as an outfielder leaders

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a force out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference.

An outfielder is a person playing in one of the three defensive positions in baseball, farthest from the batter. These defenders are the left fielder, the center fielder, and the right fielder. An outfielder's duty is to try to catch long fly balls before they hit the ground or to quickly catch or retrieve and return to the infield any other balls entering the outfield. Outfielders normally play behind the six other members of the defense who play in or near the infield. By convention, each of the nine defensive positions in baseball is numbered. The outfield positions are 7 (left field), 8 (center field) and 9 (right field). These numbers are shorthand designations useful in baseball scorekeeping and are not necessarily the same as the squad numbers worn on player uniforms.

Willie Mays is the all-time leader in putouts as an outfielder with 7,095 career. Mays is the only outfielder to record more than 7,000 career putouts. Tris Speaker (6,788), Rickey Henderson (6,468), Max Carey (6,363), Ty Cobb (6,361), and Richie Ashburn (6,089) are the only other outfielders to record more than 6,000 career putouts.

Memorial Hall (Philadelphia)

Memorial Hall is a Beaux-Arts style building in the Centennial District of West Fairmount Park, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Built as the art gallery for the 1876 Centennial Exposition, it is the only major structure from that exhibition to survive. It subsequently housed the Pennsylvania Museum of Industrial Art (now the Philadelphia Museum of Art). Since October 18, 2008, the Hall has served as home to the Please Touch Museum. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1976.

The building is located west of the Schuylkill River, at the corner of East Memorial Hall Drive and the Avenue of the Republic.

Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame

The Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame is a collection of plaques, mounted on a brick wall next to the Left Field Gate at Citizens Bank Park, the ballpark of the Philadelphia Phillies. From 1978 to 2003, the Phillies inducted one figure from their franchise history and one notable person from the Philadelphia Athletics (A's) organization each year—with the exception of 1983, when the Phillies inducted their Centennial Team. Once Veterans Stadium closed in 2003, the wall plaques used to recognize the Phillies' members were moved to Citizens Bank Park; however, the Phillies no longer induct notable Athletics. Each person inducted into the Wall of Fame was honored with a metal plaque showing the person's face; their position with, and years of service to the team; and a summary of their most important contributions. In March 2004, the Athletics' plaques were relocated to the Philadelphia Athletics Historical Society in Hatboro, Pennsylvania, and a single plaque listing all of the A's inductees was attached to a statue of Connie Mack located across the street from Citizens Bank Park.Originally, the goal of the Wall of Fame was to induct the greatest players in Phillies and Athletics history; however, exceptions have been made for non-players who have made significant contributions to the organization. Mack, the Athletics' first inductee, had an 11-year playing career in the National League and the Players' League, but is most remembered for his managerial career, and was honored as such on the Wall. Members have been inducted for contributions in more than one area; Paul Owens, inducted in 1988, spent 48 years as a member of the Phillies organization, contributing as a scout, manager, general manager, and team executive. The Phillies have inducted four first basemen, four second basemen, five third basemen, three shortstops, one utility infielder, three catchers, 21 outfielders, 18 pitchers, seven managers, one general manager, one coach, two team executives, and two sportscasters. Twenty-one members of the Wall of Fame are also members of the Baseball Hall of Fame. All of the inductees in the first four seasons from both teams are members; Del Ennis was the first non-member to be inducted.

The first figures to be inducted into the Wall of Fame were Robin Roberts, who was inducted for the Phillies; and Mack, inducted for the A's. Roberts pitched in Philadelphia for 13 seasons as a member of the National League team, and Mack managed the American League club from 1901 to 1950. Although the Athletics have retired no numbers for players from their Philadelphia years, all seven players for whom the Phillies have retired a number or honored a "P" have been inducted into the Wall of Fame: Roberts (1978), Richie Ashburn (1979), Chuck Klein (1980), Grover Cleveland Alexander (1981), Jim Bunning (1984), Steve Carlton (1989), and Mike Schmidt (1990).On April 10, 2017, it was announced Pete Rose would be that year's inductee into the wall of fame. However, on August 12, 2017, just 10 days before the ceremony, the Phillies announced Rose would not be inducted amid statutory rape allegations. Instead of inducting someone new, they celebrated past inductees.

For the 2018 season Citizens Bank Park was renovated, resulting in the Phillies Wall of Fame being moved from Ashburn Alley. A new Wall of Fame area was created behind the Left Field scoreboard, next to the Left Field gate. This overhauled Left Field Plaza honors the team’s history and incorporates new concession offerings. Featuring large replicas of the team’s World Series trophies from 1980 and 2008, statues of its retired numbers along with the relocated Wall of Fame it is an area for fans to learn about and honor the team's past.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 202 players have had surnames beginning with the letter M, which is the largest total of any single letter, followed by S with 187 players. The highest numbers of individual batters belongs to M (115), and S has the most pitchers (90). The letters with the smallest representation are Q (5 players), U (6 players), Z (7 players), and Y (8 players); however, there has never been a Phillies player, nor a player in Major League Baseball history, whose surname begins with the letter X.Thirty-two players in Phillies history have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Those players for whom the Hall recognizes the Phillies as their primary team include Grover Cleveland Alexander, Richie Ashburn, Dave Bancroft, Steve Carlton, Ed Delahanty, Billy Hamilton, Chuck Klein, Robin Roberts, Mike Schmidt, and Sam Thompson; manager Harry Wright was also inducted for his contributions with the club. The Phillies have retired numbers for six players, including Schmidt (#20), Carlton (#32), Ashburn (#1), Roberts (#36), and Jim Bunning (#14); the sixth retired number is Jackie Robinson's #42, which was retired throughout baseball in 1997. The Phillies also honor two additional players with the letter "P" in the manner of a retired number: Alexander played before numbers were used in the major leagues; and Klein wore a variety of numbers in his Phillies career.Thirty-six Phillies players have been elected to the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame. All of the players listed above (save Robinson) have been elected; also included are Dick Allen, Bob Boone, Larry Bowa, Johnny Callison, Gavvy Cravath, Darren Daulton, Del Ennis, Jimmie Foxx, Dallas Green, Granny Hamner, Willie Jones, John Kruk, Mike Lieberthal, Greg Luzinski, Garry Maddox, Sherry Magee, Tug McGraw, Juan Samuel, Curt Schilling, Bobby Shantz, Chris Short, Curt Simmons, Tony Taylor, John Vukovich, and Cy Williams. Foxx and Shantz were inducted for their contributions as members of the Philadelphia Athletics. Two non-players are also members of the Wall of Fame for their contributions to the Phillies: broadcaster Harry Kalas; and manager, general manager, and team executive Paul Owens.

Putout

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by one of the following methods:

Tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout)

Catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a force out)

Catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play

Catching a third strike (a strikeout)

Catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout)

Being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference

Range factor

Range Factor (commonly abbreviated RF) is a baseball statistic developed by Bill James. It is calculated by dividing putouts and assists by the number of innings or games played at a given defense position. The statistic is premised on the notion that the total number of outs in which a player participates is more relevant in evaluating that player's defensive play than the percentage of cleanly handled chances as calculated by the conventional statistic fielding percentage.

However, some positions (especially first baseman) may have substantially more putouts because of a superior infield around them that commits fewer errors and turns many double plays, allowing them to receive credit for more putouts. Also, catchers who have a lot of strikeout pitchers on their team will have a high range factor, because the catcher gets the putout on a strikeout if the batter does not reach base.

Utica Blue Sox

The Utica Blue Sox was the name of two minor league baseball teams based in Utica, New York.

In the 2010s, the Utica Blue Sox is the name of a collegiate wooden bat baseball team of the Perfect Game Collegiate Baseball League based in New York State.

Villanova Ballpark at Plymouth

Villanova Ballpark at Plymouth is a baseball stadium in Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania. It is the home field of the Villanova University Wildcats college baseball team. The stadium holds 750 spectators.

Prior to the venue's construction, Villanova played on campus at McGeehan Field until 1998 and at Richie Ashburn Field from 1999 to 2002.

Whiz Kids (baseball)

The Whiz Kids is the nickname of the 1950 Philadelphia Phillies of Major League Baseball. The team was largely made up of rookies; The average age of a member of the Whiz Kids was 26.4 The team won the 1950 National League pennant but failed to win the World Series.

After owner R. R. M. Carpenter, Jr. built a team of bonus babies, the 1950 team won for the majority of the season, but slumped late, allowing the defending National League champion Brooklyn Dodgers to gain ground in the last two weeks. The final series of the season was against Brooklyn, and the final game pitted the Opening Day starting pitchers, right-handers Robin Roberts and Don Newcombe, against one another. The Phillies defeated the Dodgers in extra innings in the final game of the season on a three-run home run by Dick Sisler in the top of the tenth inning. In the World Series which followed, the Whiz Kids were swept by the New York Yankees, who won their second of five consecutive World Series championships.The failure of the Whiz Kids to win another pennant after their lone successful season has been attributed to multiple theories, the most prominent of which is Carpenter's unwillingness to integrate his team after winning a pennant with an all-white team.

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