Richard de Redvers

Richard de Redvers (or Reviers, Rivers, or Latinised to de Ripariis ("from the river-banks")) (fl. c. 1066 – 8 September 1107), 1st feudal baron of Plympton in Devon,[1] was a Norman nobleman, from Reviers in Normandy, who may have been one of the companions of William the Conqueror during the Norman conquest of England from 1066. His origins are obscure, but after acting as one of the principal supporters of Henry I in his struggle against his brother Robert Curthose for control of the English throne, de Redvers was rewarded with estates that made him one of the richest magnates in the country. He was once thought to have been created the first Earl of Devon, but this theory is now discounted in favour of his son Baldwin.

Abbaye-Montebourg
A 19th century print of the ruins of Montebourg Abbey in Normandy where Richard de Redvers was buried in 1107

Life to 1100

Little is known for certain of the Redvers family before Richard. In his Baronage of England (1675–6), William Dugdale wrongly identified Richard de Redvers with Richard the son of Baldwin FitzGilbert (also known as Baldwin de Meules) who was sheriff of Devon under William the Conqueror. This error was still being repeated in the late 19th century.[2] In around 1890 The Complete Peerage advanced the alternative theory that Richard de Redvers was the son of William de Vernon,[3] but later research has cast doubt on this too, suggesting that all that can be said is that his father may have been Baldwin, one of three brothers named Redvers in Normandy in 1060; the other brothers being William, and Richard, who died in that year.[4] Similarly nothing is known of Richard's early life. The Norman poet Wace, writing c.1170, mentions a "sire de Reviers" as one of those who accompanied William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings,[5] but it is not known if this was Richard de Reviers.

The first clear references to Richard start to appear in the mid 1080s. In the Domesday Book (1086) he is recorded as holding one manor, that of Mosterton in Dorset which he may have been given for serving in William the Conqueror's army of 1066.[6] Mortestorne (as Mosterton was then known) was held by Almer before 1066. It had arable land, a mill, 30 acres of meadow and a large area of woodland and was valued at £12.[7]

According to Wace, in 1089 de Redvers was in the service of Robert Curthose, but was allowed to join his younger brother Henry's retinue at Henry's request. William the Conqueror had bequeathed Normandy to his eldest son Robert, but Henry had bought parts of it from him—including the Cotentin where Néhou, the de Redvers principal possession, was located. Since de Redvers also owned land in the Vexin which was retained by Robert, he had two lords, and evidently chose to support the one under whom his main property lay. From 1090 when Henry fell out with both his older brothers, Richard de Redvers was unswerving in his support of Henry, so much so that he was mentioned by both Orderic Vitalis and William of Jumièges in their chronicles.[8]

Richard's manor at Mosterton does not appear in the Redvers family records after about 1090 and it may therefore have been forfeited due to his support of Henry against William II.[9] The manor passed to the Blount family which held it until the end of the 14th century.[7]

Henry1
Henry I who rewarded Richard de Redvers for his support with the grant of extensive estates

Under Henry I

When William Rufus died suddenly in 1100 and Henry became king, Richard de Redvers quickly became one of his most trusted advisers. He witnessed more than 20 of Henry's charters & royal writs, in several different places, and sometimes as the only witness. After Richard's death his loyalty was remarked upon by Anselm of Canterbury.[10]

His continued allegiance resulted in Henry awarding him several large grants of land, most importantly the large Honour of Plympton (or feudal barony of Plympton) in Devon (part of which was the so-called Honour of Christchurch in Hampshire (now in Dorset), which was not technically a barony[11]) and also the Lordship of the Isle of Wight with caput at Carisbrooke Castle. In addition to these he still held his estates in Normandy in the Cotentin (at Néhou) and Vexin (at Vernon) and he had also acquired the manors of Crowell in Oxfordshire and Woolley in Berkshire on his marriage.[12]

After the grants from the king, Richard's Devon estates probably consisted of around 180 Domesday manors, including Tiverton and Honiton, as well as the boroughs of Exeter and Plympton. The honour of Christchurch consisted of many widely scattered manors in several counties. He held virtually all of the Isle of Wight (the exceptions being two manors held by the bishop of Winchester),[13] and the island remained in his family until King Edward I bought it from a dying Isabella de Fortibus in 1293.[14]

According to Robert Bearman, Richard de Redvers can confidently be rated among the twelve wealthiest barons of the time, with estates worth well over £750.[15] It is notable, however, that less than one third of the value of the estates that the king bestowed on him were from ancient demesne (and hence deprived the king of income); the majority were from escheats, including the Isle of Wight which the king had confiscated after Roger de Breteul's failed Revolt of the Earls in 1075.[16] It was probably in the king's interest to have the Isle of Wight under control of someone trustworthy as it was a prime target for further attack from abroad.[17]

Was Richard the first Earl of Devon?

Some early documents suggest that Richard de Redvers was created the first Earl of Devon by Henry I. These documents include (1), the Chronicles of Ford Abbey, which have been shown to be unreliable in several matters relating to the de Redvers family;[18] (2), the Cartulary of Twynham, which apparently follows (3), the rubric appended by a later scribe to a charter issued by Richard himself; and (4), a copy of a charter issued by Richard's wife after his death, in which it is assumed that the transcriber has added the word "comitis" ("earl"); significantly the original charter is lost.[3]

Set against these few documents is the abundant charter evidence that Richard never styled himself earl, nor did any of his children or grandchildren call him such, and neither did his wife after his death call herself Countess.[3] Despite this, for many years the discrepancies caused disagreement over the numbering of the Devon earls.[19] However, since the early 20th century the matter appears to be settled, and it is now accepted that the first Earl of Devon was Richard's son, Baldwin.[20]

Marriage, children and death

Richard may have had a brother named Hugh.[21] Some time after 1086, possibly around 1094, he married Adeliza (or Adeliz), a daughter of William Peverel of Nottingham[10] and his wife Adelina of Lancaster. They had five children:

  1. Baldwin de Redvers (d.1155), created first Earl of Devon by Matilda during The Anarchy.[22]
  2. William de Vernon, married Lucy de Tancarville, daughter of William de Tancarville and his wife Matilda d'Arques. Inherited Richard's lands in Normandy.[23]
  3. Robert de Ste. Mère-Eglise.
  4. Hubert de Vernon.
  5. Hadewise de Redvers, married William de Roumare, Earl of Lincoln, c.1127.[23]

Richard de Redvers died on 8 September 1107 and was buried in the Abbey of Montebourg in Normandy, of which he was deemed the founder.[24] It has been said that the top of his stone coffin with the word "Fundator" (founder) carved on it was found and preserved by a M. de Gerville.[25] Richard's wife, Adeliza lived on until c.1160.[26]

Notes and references

  1. ^ Sanders, I.J. English Baronies: A Study of their Origin and Descent 1086-1327, Oxford, 1960, pp.137-8, Barony of Plympton
  2. ^ See, for instance: Hunt, William. "Baldwin of Moeles (DNB00)". Wikisource. Retrieved 19 December 2010.
  3. ^ a b c The Complete Peerage, Vol. 4 p.310
  4. ^ Bearman 1994, p.1–2.
  5. ^ "He who was then sire de Reviers, brought with him many knights who were foremost in the assault, bearing the enemy down with their warhorses." Translation by Edgar Taylor, London, William Pickering, 1837. In Linton, Michael. "Master Wace his Chronicle of The Norman Conquest from the Roman De Rou, Chapter XXII". Medieval Mosaic Ltd. Retrieved 19 December 2010.
  6. ^ Bearman, Robert (1995), "Some aspects of a baronial career in the reign of King Stephen", Anglo-Norman Studies: Proceedings of the Battle Conference, XVIII: 28, ISBN 9780851156668
  7. ^ a b Hutchins, John (1860–74). W. Shipp & J.W. Hodson (ed.). The History and Antiquities of the County of Dorset (third ed.). Westminster: J. B. Nichols & Sons.
  8. ^ Bearman 1994, p.2–3.
  9. ^ Bearman 1994, p.17.
  10. ^ a b Bearman 1994, p.3.
  11. ^ Sanders, p.112
  12. ^ Bearman 1994, pp.17–18.
  13. ^ Bearman 1994, pp.19–23.
  14. ^ Barbara English, ‘Forz , Isabella de, suo jure countess of Devon, and countess of Aumale (1237–1293)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, Jan 2008. Accessed 2008-03-12
  15. ^ Bearman 1994, p.24.
  16. ^ Bearman 1994, p.22.
  17. ^ Bearman 1994, p.26.
  18. ^ For instance, The Book of Ford Abbey records Richard's date of death as 1137 and states that he died without issue, leaving all his inheritance to his sister Adeliza. (Planché, James Robinson (1855), "On the Lords of the Isle of Wight", The Journal of the British Archaeological Association, 11 (3): 217, doi:10.1080/00681288.1855.11887182)
  19. ^ See, for instance: The Conqueror and His Companions: Richard de Redvers, an extract from J.R. Planché: Somerset Herald. London: Tinsley Brothers, 1874; and The Complete Peerage, Vol. 4 p.310
  20. ^ For transcripts of the two charters referred to, and the author's bald statements that the assertions of earldom were errors, see Bearman 1994, pp.55 and 63.
  21. ^ His sister is mentioned in a charter of 1107 (Bearman 1994, p.57), and "Hugo" is mentioned as Earl Baldwin's uncle in a charter of c.1130. (Bearman 1994, p.158–159)
  22. ^ David Bates, The Normans and Empire, (Oxford University Press, 2013), 16.
  23. ^ a b Bearman 1994, p.5.
  24. ^ Round, John Horace, "Redvers, family of", Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900
  25. ^ See, for instance: The Duchess of Cleveland (1889). "Riuers". The Battle Abbey Roll with Some Account of the Norman Lineages. III. London: John Murray. Online at: "1066: A Medieval Mosaic". Medieval Mosaic Ltd. Retrieved 19 December 2010.
  26. ^ Bearman 1994, p.5, note 24; and p.59

Sources

1193

Year 1193 (MCXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Baldwin de Redvers, 1st Earl of Devon

Baldwin de Redvers, 1st Earl of Devon (died 4 June 1155), feudal baron of Plympton in Devon, was the son of Richard de Redvers and his wife Adeline Peverel.

He was one of the first to rebel against King Stephen, and was the only first rank magnate never to accept the new king. He seized Exeter, and was a pirate out of Carisbrooke, but he was driven out of England to Anjou, where he joined the Empress Matilda. She made him Earl of Devon after she established herself in England, probably in early 1141.He founded several monasteries, notably those of Quarr Abbey (1131), in the Isle of Wight, a priory at Breamore, Hampshire, and the Priory of St James, at Exeter. Some monastic chronicles call his father also Earl of Devon, but no contemporary record uses the title, including the monastic charters.

Baldwin de Redvers, 3rd Earl of Devon

Baldwin de Redvers, 3rd Earl of Devon (c. 1160–1188) was Earl of Devon from 1162 until his death and was feudal baron of Plympton in Devon. His birth is not attested; but he had a younger brother, and he was invested with the Earldom between the Pipe Rolls of 1185 and 1186, so he should not have been much over twenty-one.

He married Denise the heiress of Raoul, Prince of Déols, lord of Châteauroux and Charenton-du-Cher. After his death, she married André de Chauvigny.

He was succeeded by his brother, Richard de Redvers, 4th Earl of Devon.

Christchurch Castle

Christchurch Castle is located in Christchurch, Dorset, England (grid reference SZ160927). The earliest stonework has been dated to 1160. It is a Norman motte and bailey castle. The castle's site is inside the old Saxon burh dominating the River Avon's lowest crossing.

The Constable's House standing adjacent to the castle was added at around 1160 and is a rare and notable example of a Norman domestic dwelling. Today the bailey is home to a bowling green and gardens, and the ditch has been filled but parts of the keep and much of the constable's house still stand. The site is managed by English Heritage.

Crewkerne Castle

Crewkerne Castle (which is also known as Castle Hill or Croft Castle) was possibly a Norman motte and bailey castle on a mound that is situated north-west of the town of Crewkerne in Somerset, England.

Earl of Devon

The title of Earl of Devon was created several times in the English peerage, and was possessed first (after the Norman Conquest of 1066) by the de Redvers (alias de Reviers, Revieres, etc.) family, and later by the Courtenays. It is not to be confused with the title of Earl of Devonshire, held, together with the title Duke of Devonshire, by the Cavendish family of Chatsworth House, Derbyshire, although the letters patent for the creation of the latter peerages used the same Latin words, Comes Devon(iae). It was a re-invention, if not an actual continuation, of the pre-Conquest office of Ealdorman of Devon.Close kinsmen and powerful allies of the Plantagenet kings, especially Edward III, Richard II, Henry IV and Henry V, the Earls of Devon were treated with suspicion by the Tudors, perhaps unfairly, partly because William Courtenay, 1st Earl of Devon (1475–1511), had married Princess Catherine of York, a younger daughter of King Edward IV, bringing the Earls of Devon very close to the line of succession to the English throne. During the Tudor period all but the last Earl were attainted, and there were several recreations and restorations. The last recreation was to the heirs male of the grantee, not (as would be usual) to the heirs male of his body. When he died unmarried, it was assumed the title was extinct, but a much later very distant Courtenay cousin, of the family seated at Powderham, whose common ancestor was Hugh de Courtenay, 2nd Earl of Devon (d.1377), seven generations before this Earl, successfully claimed the title in 1831. During this period of dormancy the de jure Earls of Devon, the Courtenays of Powderham, were created baronets and later viscounts.

During this time, an unrelated earldom of similar name, now called for distinction the Earldom of Devonshire, was created twice, once for Charles Blount, 8th Baron Mountjoy, who had no legitimate children, and a second time for the Cavendish family, now Dukes of Devonshire. Unlike the Dukes of Devonshire, seated in Derbyshire, the Earls of Devon were strongly connected to the county of Devon. Their seat is Powderham Castle, near Starcross on the River Exe.

The Earl of Devon has not inherited the ancient and original Barony of Courtenay or the Viscountcy of Courtenay of Powderham (1762–1835); nevertheless, his heir is styled Lord Courtenay by courtesy.

Faulkbourne

Faulkbourne is a civil parish in the Braintree district of Essex, about 2 miles (3 km) north-west of Witham. The population at the 2011 Census was included in the civil parish of Fairstead. According to Faulkbourne's Victorian era rector, the Rev. Frederick Spurrell, the name of the village (which was also spelled "Faulkbourn") is probably derived from the Old English words "falk" or "folc" (meaning "folk") and "burn" (meaning "well").

It originated as the Manor of Faulkbourne, centred on Faulkbourne Hall and St Germanus Church. That manor had been held by Turbin in the time of Edward the Confessor and was given by William the Conqueror to his nephew Haimo whose niece passed the Manor by marriage to Henry I's natural son, Robert, Earl of Gloucester. It subsequently belonged to Richard de Luci, Lord Chief Justice of England and Sheriff of Essex in 1156. In 1243, Richard de Redvers succeeded to the manor.

After passing through several hands, the Manor was left by Sir Thomas Montgomery to his nephew John Fortescue in 1494, whose descendant of the same name sold the Manor to Sir Edward Bullock in 1637. The Bullock family lived at Faulkbourne until the turn of the 20th century, and included Colonel John Bullock, Member of Parliament for several Essex constituencies for 56 years. In April 1885, Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll (Queen Victoria's daughter) stood as sponsor at the christening of a member of the Bullock family.

Feudal barony of Plympton

The feudal barony of Plympton (or Honour of Plympton) was a large feudal barony in the county of Devon, England, whose caput was Plympton Castle and manor, Plympton. It was one of eight feudal baronies in Devonshire which existed during the medieval era. It included the so-called Honour of Christchurch in Hampshire (now in Dorset), which was not however technically a barony. The de Redvers family, first holders of the barony, were also Lords of the Isle of Wight, which lordship was not inherited by the Courtenays, as was the barony of Plympton, as it had been sold to the king by the last in the line Isabel de Redvers, 8th Countess of Devon (1237–1293).

Geoffrey de Mandeville, Baron of Marshwood

Geoffrey de Mandeville (died c.1119) was the Sheriff of Devon, England between 1100-1116 and also baron of Marshwood in Dorset.Marshwood is near the border of Devon and Dorset, 5.5 miles north east of Lyme Regis.

List of Earls in the reign of Henry II of England

The following individuals were Earls (suo jure or jure uxoris) or Countesses (suo jure) during the reign of King Henry II of England who reigned from 1154 to 1189.

The period of tenure as Earl or Countess is given after the name and title of each individual, including any period of minority.

Earl of Arundel

William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel, 1st Earl of Lincoln (1138-1176)

William d'Aubigny, 2nd Earl of Arundel (1176-1193)

Earl of Buckingham

Walter Giffard, 2nd Earl of Buckingham (1102-1164)

Earl of Buckingham (Second Creation)

Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, 1st Earl of Buckingham (1164-1176)

Earl of Chester

Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester (1153-1181)

Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester (1181-1232)

Earl of Derby

Robert de Ferrers, 2nd Earl of Derby (1139-1162)

William de Ferrers, 3rd Earl of Derby (1162-1190)

Earl of Devon

Baldwin de Redvers, 1st Earl of Devon (1141-1155)

Richard de Redvers, 2nd Earl of Devon (1155-1162)

Baldwin de Redvers, 3rd Earl of Devon (1162-1188)

Richard de Redvers, 4th Earl of Devon (1188-1193)

Earl of Essex

Geoffrey de Mandeville, 2nd Earl of Essex (1144-1166)

William de Mandeville, 3rd Earl of Essex (1166-1189)

Earl of Gloucester

William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester (1147-1183)

Isabel, Countess of Gloucester suo jure (1183-1189)

John of England, Earl of Gloucester jure uxoris (1189-1199)

Earl of Hereford

Roger Fitzmiles, 2nd Earl of Hereford (1143-1155)

Earl of Hertford

Roger de Clare, 2nd Earl of Hertford (1153-1173)

Richard de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford (1173-1217)

Earl of Huntingdon

Simon II de Senlis, Earl of Huntingdon (1153-1157)

Malcolm IV, King of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon (1157-1165)

William the Lion, King of Scots, Earl of Huntingdon (1166-1173)

David of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon (1173-1174))

Simon III de Senlis, Earl of Huntingdon (1174-1184)

David of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon (1185-1219)

Earl of Leicester

Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester (1118-1168)

Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester (1168-1190)

Earl of Lincoln

William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel, 1st Earl of Lincoln (1143-?)

Earl of Lincoln (Second Creation)

Gilbert de Gant, Earl of Lincoln (1149-1156)

Earl of Norfolk

Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk (1141-1177)

Earl of Northumbria

William the Lion, King of Scots, Earl of Northumbria (1152-1157)

Earl of Oxford

Aubrey de Vere, 1st Earl of Oxford (1141-1194)

Earl of Pembroke

Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, 1st Earl of Buckingham (1148-1176)

Gilbert de Clare, 3rd Earl of Pembroke (1176-1185)

Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke suo jure (1185-1199)

Earl of Richmond

Conan IV, Duke of Brittany, Earl of Richmond (1138-1171)

Constance, Duchess of Brittany, Countess of Richmond suo jure (1171-1201)

Earl of Salisbury

Patrick of Salisbury, 1st Earl of Salisbury (1149-1168)

William of Salisbury, 2nd Earl of Salisbury (1168-1196)

Earl of Surrey

Isabel de Warenne, Countess of Surrey suo jure (1148-1203)

William I, Count of Boulogne, Earl of Surrey jure uxoris (1153-1159)

Hamelin de Warenne, Earl of Surrey jure uxoris (1164-1202)

Earl of Warwick

William de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Warwick (1153-1184)

Waleran de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Warwick (1184-1203)

Earl of York

William le Gros, Earl of York (1138-1179)

List of Earls in the reign of Richard I of England

This is a list of Earls (suo jure or jure uxoris) or Countesses (suo jure) during the reign of Richard I of England who reigned from 1189 to 1199.

The period of tenure as Earl or Countess is given after the name and title of each individual, including any period of minority.

Earl of Arundel

William d'Aubigny, 2nd Earl of Arundel (1176-1193)

William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel (1193-1221)

Earl of Chester

Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester (1181-1232)

Earl of Derby

William de Ferrers, 3rd Earl of Derby (1162-1190)

William de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby (1190-1247)

Earl of Devon

Richard de Redvers, 4th Earl of Devon (1188-1193)

William de Redvers, 5th Earl of Devon (1193-1217)

Earl of Essex

William de Mandeville, 3rd Earl of Essex (1166-1189)

Earl of Gloucester

Isabella, Countess of Gloucester suo jure (1183-1217)

John of England, Earl of Gloucester jure uxoris (1189-1199)

Earl of Hertford

Richard de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford (1173-1217)

Earl of Huntingdon

David of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon (1185-1219)

Earl of Leicester

Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester (1168-1190)

Robert de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Leicester (1191-1204)

Earl of Norfolk

Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk (1189-1221)

Earl of Northumbria

Hugh de Puiset, Bishop of Durham, Earl of Northumbria (1189-1190)

Earl of Oxford

Aubrey de Vere, 1st Earl of Oxford (1141-1194)

Aubrey de Vere, 2nd Earl of Oxford (1194-1214)

Earl of Pembroke

Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke suo jure (1185-1199)

Earl of Richmond

Constance, Duchess of Brittany, Countess of Richmond suo jure (1171-1201)

Geoffrey II, Duke of Brittany, Earl of Richmond jure uxoris (1181-1186)

Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester, Earl of Richmond jure uxoris (1188-1198)

Earl of Salisbury

William of Salisbury, 2nd Earl of Salisbury (1168-1196)

Ela of Salisbury, 3rd Countess of Salisbury suo jure (1196-1261)

William Longespée, 3rd Earl of Salisbury jure uxoris (1196-1226)

Earl of Surrey

Isabel de Warenne, Countess of Surrey suo jure (1148-1203)

Hamelin de Warenne, Earl of Surrey jure uxoris (1159-1202)

Earl of Warwick

Waleran de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Warwick (1184-1203)

List of peers 1150–1159

This page lists all peers who held extant titles between the years 1150 and 1159.

Lord of the Isle of Wight

The Lord of the Isle of Wight is a title that began when William the Conqueror granted the Isle of Wight to William Fitz Osbern. It was a hereditary title.

The last Lord of the Island of Wight was actually not a lord but a lady. Countess Isabella de Fortibus acquired the lordship when her brother died in 1262. The countess had been widowed in 1261 and became the wealthiest female in the British Islands who was not a member of a royal family. Isabella dwelt in Carisbrooke Castle. She exercised her rights and privileges as feudal overlord of the Isle of Wight. In 1293, lying on her death bed, the countess sold the island to Edward I for 6,000 marks.

The Lordship thereafter became a royal appointment. The last Lord of the Isle of Wight was Edward Woodville, Lord Scales (d. 1488).

Richard de Redvers, 2nd Earl of Devon

Richard de Redvers, 2nd Earl of Devon (died 1162) was Earl of Devon from 1155 until his death and was feudal baron of Plympton in Devon. He married Denise, one of the daughters and coheiresses of Reginald, Earl of Cornwall. He was High Sheriff of Devon from 1154–1157. He was the son of Baldwin de Redvers, 1st Earl of Devon and brother of William de Reviers, 5th Earl of Devon.

He was succeeded by his son Baldwin de Redvers, 3rd Earl of Devon (died 1188).

Richard de Redvers, 4th Earl of Devon

Richard de Redvers, 4th Earl of Devon (died 1193) was Earl of Devon from 1188 until his death and was feudal baron of Plympton in Devon.He inherited the title on the death of his elder brother Baldwin de Redvers, 3rd Earl of Devon, who died childless. On his own death without issue the title passed to his uncle, William de Redvers, 5th Earl of Devon, third but only surviving son of the 1st Earl.

Thorley Manor

Thorley Manor is a manor house just outside Yarmouth, on the Isle of Wight, England. Built in 1712, it features a modillion cornice, hipped roof, as well as tall chimneys.

Washfield

Washfield is a village, parish and former manor in Devon, England, situated about 2 miles north-west of Tiverton. The parish church is dedicated to St Mary the Virgin. It was within the jurisdiction of the historic West Budleigh Hundred.

William Peverel

William Peverell (c. 1040 – c. 1115, Latinised to Gulielmus Piperellus), was a Norman knight granted lands in England following the Norman Conquest.

William de Redvers, 5th Earl of Devon

William de Redvers, 5th Earl of Devon (died 10 September 1217) (or de Reviers), of Tiverton Castle and Plympton Castle, both in Devon, was feudal baron of Plympton in Devon.

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