Rich Moore (American football)

Richard Clifton "Rich" Moore (born April 26, 1947 in Cleveland, Ohio) is a former American football defensive tackle in the National Football League who played 20 games for the Green Bay Packers. In 1969, the Green Bay Packers used the 12th pick in the 1st round of the 1969 NFL Draft to sign Moore out of Villanova University. He had previously been named as a first team tackle on the East Coast Athletic Conference all-conference team in 1968, his senior season at Villanova.[1] Moore went on to play for two seasons with the Packers. He tore an Achilles tendon in a win over the Philadelphia Eagles in the 1970 season, and had surgery shortly thereafter, putting him out for the season.[2] After trying him on offense during training camp in 1971, the Packers traded him to the New England Patriots for linebacker John Bramlett in late July 1971.[3] However, Moore was unable to play for the Patriots in 1971 due to injury. He was then released by the Patriots in June 1972.[4]

Moore's only known statistic is a single fumble recovery in the 1969 season. His son, Brandon Moore, later played offensive tackle for the New England Patriots from 1993 through 1995.

Rich Moore
Born:April 26, 1947 (age 71)
Cleveland, Ohio
Career information
Position(s)Tackle
CollegeVillanova
NFL draft1969 / Round: 1 / Pick: 12
Career history
As player
1969–1970Green Bay Packers

The 1969 Packers draft

Moore's selection is still remembered by Packers fans and observers as one of the most ill-fated in team history. Multiple writers have listed his selection as one of the most disappointing Packers draft picks of all time (though most do not make note of his career-ending injury).[5][6] Packers' head coach Phil Bengtson overruled personnel director Pat Peppler, who had rated other players higher and who thought Moore would be available later in the draft. Vince Lombardi was still the Packers' general manager during the draft, but he was in negotiations to become head coach and general manager of the Washington Redskins, a deal which was finalized the next week.[7] Peppler later said, "Rich Moore was a disaster. Phil Bengtson fell in love with his size." [8] Three players available when the Packers took Moore went on the Pro Football Hall of Fame: Roger Wehrli, Ted Hendricks and Charlie Joiner, and they also passed up other players who starred in the NFL for many years, such as Fred Dryer, Calvin Hill and Ed White.[9] The 1969 Packers draft was a weak one overall beyond Moore's selection. The Packers' next pick, second round choice Dave Bradley, played in only 16 games in a career that ended in 1972, and by 1974 not one 1969 Packers pick remained on the team. Only 9th round choice Dave Hampton was in the NFL at all by 1975, finishing his NFL career with the Falcons and Eagles in 1976.[10]

References

  1. ^ Villanova University, "2011 Villanova Football", page 113.
  2. ^ Associated Press, "Rich Moore May Be Out for Season", Daytona Beach Morning Journal, October 27, 1970, page 7.
  3. ^ Milwaukee Journal, "Packers Trade Moore for Linebacker", July 31, 1971, page 12.
  4. ^ Associated Press, "Patriots Release Tackle Rich Moore", Gettysburg Times, June 9, 1972, page 10.
  5. ^ Mike Beacom, "The All-Bust Defense", Inside Wisconsin Sports, ca. 2012. http://insidewisconsinsports.com/ME2/Sites/dirmod.asp?sid=&nm=&type=Publishing&mod=Publications%3A%3AArticle&mid=8F3A7027421841978F18BE895F87F791&SiteID=2477FFEE2D4240CBB5B323AEB9C13634&tier=4&id=F7FEA21EDFC84241A7B2934C4E8ED1C9 . Downloaded March 6, 2013.
  6. ^ Kevin Van Pelt, "Green Bay Packers: Five Worst First-Round Draft Picks in Team History", Bleacher Report, March 27, 2012: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1118799-the-5-worst-1st-round-draft-picks-in-green-bay-packers-history/page/6 . Downloaded March 6, 2013.
  7. ^ David Maraniss, When Pride Still Mattered: A Life of Vince Lombardi (Simon and Schuster, 1999), p. 454.
  8. ^ PackersHistory.net, "Rich Moore: A 1st Round Bust for the Ages". http://www.packershistory.net/1969PACKERS.html . Downloaded March 6, 2013.
  9. ^ Pro-Football-Reference.com, "1969 AFL-NFL Draft". https://www.pro-football-reference.com/years/1969/draft.htm . Downloaded March 6, 2013.
  10. ^ Pro-Football-Reference.com, ibid.
Rich (given name)

Rich is a masculine given name, often short for Richard. People with the name include:

Rich Campbell (American football) (born 1958), American former National Football League quarterback

Rich Coady (center) (born 1944), American National Football League center

Rich Coady (defensive back) (born 1976), American National Football League defensive back, son of the above

Rich Cronin (1974–2010), American singer-songwriter, member of the band LFO

Rich Eisen (born 1969), American television journalist

Rich Hall (born 1954), American comedian

Rich Hill (baseball coach) (born c. 1962), American head baseball coach at the University of San Diego

Rich Hill (pitcher) (born 1980), American Major League Baseball pitcher

Rich Johnson (publishing executive), publishing executive in the field of graphic novels

Rich Johnson (basketball) (1946–1994), American basketball player

Rich Jones (musician) (born 1973), English guitarist

Rich Jones (basketball) (born 1946), retired American Basketball Association and National Basketball Association player

Rich King (basketball) (born 1969), American National Basketball Association player

Rich King (sportscaster) (born 1947), American television sportscaster

Rich Kreitling (born 1936), American retired National Football League player

Rich Lowry (born 1968), American magazine editor, syndicated columnist, author and political commentator

Rich Milot (born 1957), American retired National Football League player

Rich Moore (born 1963), American animation director

Rich Moore (American football) (born 1947), American football player

Rich Robertson (left-handed pitcher) (born 1968), American former Major League Baseball pitcher

Rich Robertson (right-handed pitcher) (born 1944), American former Major League Baseball pitcher

Rich Sommer (born 1978), American actor

Rich Thompson (disambiguation)

Rich Wilson (journalist), UK-based freelance rock music writer

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