Rich Mauti

Richard Dominic Mauti (born May 25, 1954) is a former American football wide receiver who played professionally in the National Football League (NFL) for the New Orleans Saints and the Washington Redskins. He played college football at Penn State.

In 6 seasons with the New Orleans Saints, Mauti, a reserve wide receiver, excelled as a special teams player. In 1978, he was named the Saints Special Teams MVP after setting an NFL record for special team tackles with 27 solo tackles and 4 assisted tackles for the year. In 1980, he was second in the NFL and first in the NFC in Average Return Yards on kickoffs and was named to the Pro Bowl as the NFC's Punt Returner. Rich Mauti is also the founder of the Rich Mauti Cancer Fund, a voluntary, a 501c3 non-profit organization designed to raise money for cancer research, education and screenings, with all funds to be utilized in the State of Louisiana. While Mauti was playing for the Saints he started Mauti Challenge where businesses and individuals could pledge contributions to cancer research. Donations were $10 for every return and $1 for every yard from returns. [1][2]

Rich Mauti
No. 84, 83
Position:Wide receiver
Personal information
Born:May 25, 1954 (age 65)
East Meadow, New York
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:190 lb (86 kg)
Career information
High school:East Meadow (NY)
College:Penn State
Undrafted:1977
Career history
Player stats at PFR

References

  1. ^ "Rich Mauti Stats". Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved June 22, 2016.
  2. ^ http://www.nosaintshistory.com/no_saints_pictures/rich-mauti/
1977 NFL Draft

The 1977 NFL draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held May 3–4, 1977, at the Roosevelt Hotel in New York City, New York. The league also held its first supplemental draft, which took place after the regular draft and before the regular season.

This was the first draft in the common draft era (since 1967) to be 12 rounds, five rounds fewer than drafts of 1967-76. The draft remained at 12 rounds through 1992 before being reduced to seven, where it has remained through 2019.

1977 New Orleans Saints season

The 1977 New Orleans Saints season was the team's 11th as a member of the National Football League. They were unable to improve on their previous season's output of 4–10, winning only three games. The team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the eleventh consecutive season, as Coach Hank Stram was fired following the season. In his two years as Coach the Saints only won seven games.

1978 New Orleans Saints season

The 1978 New Orleans Saints season was the Saints 12th season. Quarterback Archie Manning put together one of his finest seasons, earning the NFC Player of the Year award as the Saints finished with a franchise-best 7–9 mark under new head coach Dick Nolan.

1978 Pittsburgh Steelers season

The 1978 Pittsburgh Steelers season was the franchise's 46th season in the National Football League (NFL). The season concluded with the team winning Super Bowl XIII to become the first franchise in the NFL to win three Super Bowl titles. The championship run was led by quarterback Terry Bradshaw and the team's vaunted Steel Curtain defense. This team is regarded as one of the greatest defensive teams of all time and one of the greatest teams in NFL history. Bradshaw put together the best year of his career to that point, becoming only the second Steeler to win the NFL MVP award. Ten Steelers players were named to the Pro Bowl team, and four were judged as first-team All-Pros by the AP. Head coach Chuck Noll returned for his tenth season—moving him ahead of Walt Kiesling as the longest tenured head coach in the team's history to that point.The Steelers entered the season as defending champions of the AFC Central Division, coming off a 9–5 record in 1977. Despite winning their division, the previous season was a difficult one for the team (both on and off the field) which culminated in a division round playoff loss to the Denver Broncos on Christmas Eve.

The team began the 1978 season with seven straight victories, before losing to the Houston Oilers in prime time on Monday Night Football. They finished the season with a league-best 14–2 record, including a 5-game winning streak to close the season. This record assured them they would play at home throughout the 1978 playoffs. It was also the best record compiled in the team's history (since surpassed only by a 15–1 mark in 2004).The 1978 Steelers team was rated the thirty-fifth best team in the history of the NFL (to September 2015) by FiveThirtyEight, a polling aggregation and statistical service. The rating is based upon FiveThirtyEight's proprietary Elo rating system algorithm. Only two Steelers teams were rated higher: the 1975 team at twelfth and the 2005 team one slot ahead of the 1978 team at thirty-fourth.

1979 New Orleans Saints season

The 1979 New Orleans Saints season was the team's 13th season in the National Football League. The Saints finished the season at 8–8, the franchise's first non-losing season. New Orleans was tied for first place with the Los Angeles Rams in the NFC West with three weeks to play, but the season unraveled in a Monday Night Football contest at home vs. the Oakland Raiders, when the Saints squandered a 35–14 lead and lost, 42–35.

The Saints were eliminated from playoff contention in Week 15 when they were blown out 35–0 at home by the San Diego Chargers. Not counting the 1976 expansion club Seattle, New Orleans was one of three franchises which failed to make the playoffs in the 1970s, joined by the New York Giants and New York Jets.

1980 New Orleans Saints season

The 1980 New Orleans Saints season was the team's 14th as a member of the National Football League. It was unable to improve on the previous season's output of 8–8, winning only one game. The team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the fourteenth consecutive season and had the dubious distinction not only of winning only a single game, but winning it by a single point against the equally disappointing Jets, who like the Saints had widely been predicted before the season to advance to their first playoff appearance since 1969.

1981 New Orleans Saints season

The 1981 New Orleans Saints season was the Saints' 15th season. Hoping past success would bring a bright future to New Orleans the Saints hired Bum Phillips to be their new head coach. With the first pick overall the Saints draft Heisman Trophy winner George Rogers out of South Carolina. Phillips banked on Rogers giving the Saints the same boost that Earl Campbell did when Phillips drafted him out of Texas three years earlier.

Rogers won the Offensive Rookie of the Year, as he rushed all-time rookie record of 1,674 yards, a record which was eclipsed just two years later when Eric Dickerson of the Los Angeles Rams rushed for 1,808. However, the Saints would continue to struggle finishing with a 4-12 record. It was New Orleans' 13th season with five or fewer wins, and its eighth with double-digit defeats.

Despite the team finishing with a bad record, they did have two special moments. The first was in week eight, when they upset the Cincinnati Bengals, who would go to the Super Bowl after winning the AFC championship. The second came four weeks later when Phillips returned to Houston, where his new team defeated his old one 27-24.

1982 New Orleans Saints season

The 1982 New Orleans Saints season saw the team nearly qualify for the NFL playoffs, missing it by a tiebreaker. It finished with a 4–5 record, and narrowly missed the playoffs in a complicated labyrinth of tie-breakers.

1983 New Orleans Saints season

The 1983 New Orleans Saints season was the team’s 17th as a member of the National Football League. They improved on their previous season’s output of 4–5, winning eight games. Despite the improvement, the team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the seventeenth consecutive season.

With an 8–7 record going into the final game of the season at the Superdome against the Los Angeles Rams, the Saints, with a win, would have finished with their first winning season and their first playoff berth. However, Rams kicker Mike Lansford kicked a 42-yard field goal with :06 left to defeat the Saints 26-24, and advance to the playoffs. Other than that field goal, the Rams did not score a single point on offense, instead scoring via a punt return for a touchdown, two interception returns for touchdowns, and a safety.

Two weeks earlier the Saints lost to the New England Patriots in shocking conditions with sleet and snow – with the only score being set up by Patriot Ricky Smith returning the initial kickoff to the 3-yard line. As of 2017, this game remains the most recent 7–0 result in NFL history, with only two games since seeing just one score, both a single field goal.Another damaging loss came on Monday Night Football in week 12, when the New York Jets rallied from a 14-point deficit by scoring 17 unanswered points in the fourth quarter, capped off by a 76-yard punt return touchdown by Kirk Springs, to stun the Saints 31-28. The Saints had a chance to force overtime in the closing seconds, but Morten Andersen missed badly to the left on a 51-yard field goal attempt.

Football Digest

Football Digest was a sports magazine for fans interested in professional American football, with in-depth coverage of the National Football League (NFL). The magazine modeled the Reader's Digest idea, to bring the best in football journalism from newspapers and magazines that the fans would have otherwise not had an opportunity to read.

The final issue was published in November 2005.

It also had its own independent All-Rookie team which began in 1971 and its own All-pro team which began in the 1980s. The All-Pro team was chosen by the editorial staff which gave them the freedom to choose otherwise less-publicized players on the second-team selections. By interviewing coaches and players the editors felt they got the inside "scoop" on who the "sleepers" were for an All-Pro Team.

List of New Orleans Saints players

This is a list of American football players who have played for the New Orleans Saints in the National Football League (NFL). It includes players that have played at least one match in the NFL regular season. The New Orleans Saints franchise was founded in 1967. The Saints have won one Super Bowl (Super Bowl XLIV), have one conference championship, and have five division championships.

List of Penn State Nittany Lions in the NFL draft

This is a list of Penn State Nittany Lions football players in the NFL Draft.

List of Penn State football players

Penn State University American football players.

List of Washington Redskins players

This is a list of American football players who have played for the Washington Redskins, as well as its predecessors the Boston Braves (1932) and Boston Redskins (1933–1936), in the National Football League (NFL). It includes players that have played at least five games in the NFL regular season. The Washington Redskins franchise was founded in Boston, Massachusetts as the Boston Braves, named after the local baseball franchise. The name was changed the next year to the Redskins. In 1937, the franchise moved to Washington, D.C.The Redskins have played over 1,000 games. In those games, the club won five professional American football championships including two NFL Championships and three Super Bowls. The franchise captured ten NFL divisional titles and six NFL conference championships.Overall, the Redskins have had a total of 23 players and coaches (17 primary, six minor) inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Many Redskins players have also had successful college football careers, including six who were Heisman Trophy winners: Gary Beban, Desmond Howard, Vic Janowicz, George Rogers, Danny Wuerffel, and Robert Griffin III. In addition, the Heisman Trophy sculpture was modeled after Ed Smith in 1934, who became a Redskins player in 1936.Several former players have become head coach of the Redskins, including Turk Edwards, Dick Todd, and Jack Pardee. In addition, former players have become assistant coaches, such as Earnest Byner, Russ Grimm, Greg Manusky, and Keenan McCardell. Other players have also become successful in non-sport activities, like acting (Terry Crews and Jamal Duff) and politics (Tom Osborne and Heath Shuler).Players on the Redskins have also been related from time to time. In 1957, Redskins end Joe Walton became the first son of an NFL player to play in the league. His father, Frank Walton also played on the Redskins. Joe Krakoski and his son, also named Joe Krakoski, also both played for the Redskins. In addition, four sets of brothers have played with each other while on the Redskins: Chris and Nic Clemons, Cecil and Ray Hare, Ed and Robert Khayat, and Dan and Matt Turk.

Mandeville, Louisiana

Mandeville is a small city in St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana, United States. The population was 11,560 at the 2010 census. Mandeville is located on the North Shore of Lake Pontchartrain, south of Interstate 12. It is across the lake from the city of New Orleans and its southshore suburbs. It is part of the New Orleans–Metairie–Kenner metropolitan area.

Michael Mauti

Michael D. Mauti (born January 19, 1990) is an American football linebacker who is currently a free agent. He was drafted by the Minnesota Vikings in the seventh round of the 2013 NFL Draft. He played college football at Penn State.

Steve Gleason

Stephen Michael Gleason (born March 19, 1977) is a former professional American football player who played as a safety with the New Orleans Saints of the National Football League (NFL). Originally signed by the Indianapolis Colts as an undrafted free agent in 2000, he played for the Saints through the 2007 season. As a free agent in 2008, Gleason retired from the NFL after eight seasons. Gleason is especially well known for his blocked punt in a 2006 game that became a symbol of recovery in New Orleans in the team's first home game after Hurricane Katrina.

In 2011, Gleason revealed that he was battling amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. His experiences while living with the disease were captured on video over the course of a five-year period and featured in the 2016 documentary Gleason.

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