Reverse-Flash

Reverse-Flash is a name used by several fictional supervillains appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics. Each iteration of the character serves as a foil and an enemy of the Flash.

Characters

Edward Clariss

Rival Clariss
The Rival, the first Reverse-Flash, by Carlo Barberi and Terry Austin.

Edward Clariss (also known as the Rival and Rival Flash) first appeared in Flash Comics #104 (February 1949), and was created by John Broome and Joe Kubert. Although not called Reverse-Flash, Dr. Edward Clariss was a professor at the university attended by the Golden Age Flash, and had recreated the formula which was behind Jay Garrick's speed. He hears Joan Williams (Garrick's girlfriend) talking about how the Flash's own speed was given to another student, which helped him develop the formula. Bitter at the scientific community's rejection of his claims, Clariss becomes a criminal. A darker version of the Flash with a mask over his head, he gives the formula to other criminals. The Rival's version of the formula is temporary, and he is captured and jailed. (Later stories have indicated a possible link between the Clariss formula and the Velocity 9 created by Vandal Savage, but thus far no such link has been conclusively proven.)

JSA #16 (November 2000) contains a flashback to a battle between the Rival and the Flash several months after the former's first appearance. Now that he has inexplicably regained super speed, Clariss reaches light speed during the fight and vanishes into the Speed Force. After the Justice Society of America's reformation 50 years later, Johnny Sorrow retrieves Clariss from the Speed Force and invites him to join the Injustice Society. Driven insane in the Speed Force, the Rival races across the country on a killing spree. The Flash realizes that the Rival's path across the country spells out Clariss's name and the final murder victim will be Joan; Jay absorbs the Rival's speed before he can kill Joan.

The Rival returns in Impulse #88 (September 2002), posing as Joan's doctor. Now pure speed energy, he possesses fellow Golden Age speedster Max Mercury. After battling Jay and Impulse, Max time-travels to an unknown destination. In The Flash: Rebirth #4, Max escapes from the Speed Force and is rejuvenated by Wally West's energy; this allows him to return to Earth in a new body. Another Golden Age Reverse-Flash is a robot whose only appearance was in one panel of The Flash #134 (February 1998), where he is defeated by Garrick.

Eobard Thawne

Professor Eobard Thawne (also known as Professor Zoom) first appeared in The Flash #139 (September 1963). The archenemy of Barry Allen, he is the second major supervillain to be called Reverse-Flash.

Hunter Zolomon

Hunter Zolomon (also known as Zoom) first appeared in The Flash: Secret Files & Origins #3 (November 2001). The archenemy of Wally West, he is the third supervillain to be called Reverse-Flash. Unlike all other Reverse-Flashes, he did not gain his superspeed from the Speed Force; due to an accident with the Cosmic Treadmill, Zolomon was essentially 'derailed' from the timeline, allowing him to control the rate at which he moved in time.

Thaddeus Thawne

Thaddeus Thawne (aka Inertia and Kid Zoom) first appeared in Impulse #51 (August 1999), and was created by Todd DeZago and Mike Wieringo. Another character not called Reverse-Flash, he is a clone of Bart Allen. Inertia first fought Impulse. When Bart aged five years after Infinite Crisis and became the Flash, Inertia fought his genetic template again. Inertia was responsible for Allen's death; Wally West returned, taking revenge by paralyzing Inertia and installing him in the Flash Museum. In Final Crisis: Rogues' Revenge, he was used by Libra and Zoom to try to get the Rogues to join the Secret Society. Inertia stole Zoom's powers, called himself Kid Zoom and was killed by the Rogues who blamed him for making them kill Bart.

Asked who created Inertia, Ethan van Sciver wrote that he could only accept five percent of the credit; the remaining credit belonged to Mike Wieringo (20 percent), Grant Morrison (25 percent) and Todd DeZago (50 percent). According to van Sciver, Inertia's appearance is an inverted depiction of Impulse.[1]

Inertia initially appeared came in Impulse #50: "First Fool's" (July 1999), followed by #51: "It's All Relative" (August 1999). His greatest character development was in #53: "Threats" (October 1999). Inertia was not featured again until Impulse #62 and #66: "Mercury Falling" (July, November 2000), and again for another five years.

He then began making regular appearances, primarily due to Bart being the Flash. Inertia appeared in The Flash: The Fastest Man Alive #5: "Lightning in a Bottle, Part 5" (December 2006). In addition to his Flash appearances, he appeared in Teen Titans (vol. 3) as part of Titans East, an enemy team, beginning in Teen Titans #43 (January 2007). The storyline concluded with #46 (April 2007). Gathering the Rogues, he attempted to drain Bart's powers for himself; the plan backfired when Wally returned when Inertia's equipment drained the Speed Force, making the Rogues accidentally beat Bart to death. As Bart tried to escape, he was captured by Wally who steals his speed leaving him immobile.

Inertia is primarily a speedster, remaining disconnected from the Speed Force after Infinite Crisis and injecting himself with Velocity 9. Although Velocity 9 has been unstable, Deathstroke's new variety seems to have no negative side effects. Inertia briefly shares his powers before his death with Zoom who lends him his speed to pressure him into being a new Kid Flash. As the maddened Kid Zoom, he masters human time streams and reverts Zoom to the powerless Hunter Zolomon before he is killed by the Rogues.

Daniel West

Daniel "Danny" West first appeared in The Flash #0 (November 2012). The younger brother of Iris West and the apparent uncle (biological father) of Wallace West, he is the most recent character to take up the Reverse-Flash mantle.

Tangent Comics

ReverseFlashTangent
Reverse-Flash in Tangent Comics

In DC's Tangent Comics, Reverse Flash is an evil, holographic duplicate of Lia Nelson (the Flash) created by a sinister government agency. She was charged with negative ionic energy to disperse Flash's photon-based form. The Flash's light-wave powers outmatched Reverse-Flash's, and she was destroyed. This Reverse Flash appeared in one issue: Tangent Comics: The Flash (December 1997).

In other media

Live action

The Rival The Flash CW
Todd Lasance as Edward Clariss / The Rival

Animation

Film

  • Professor Zoom (Eobard Thawne) appears as the main antagonist in Justice League: The Flashpoint Paradox and Suicide Squad: Hell to Pay, voiced by C. Thomas Howell.[19]
  • The Eobard Thawne version of Reverse-Flash appears as the main antagonist in Lego DC Comics Super Heroes: The Flash, voiced by Dwight Schultz.

Video games

The subsequent characters to use Reverse-Flash moniker appear in various video games.

  • Zoom (Hunter Zolomon) appears in the Game Boy Advance game Justice League Heroes: The Flash as the fourth-level boss.
  • Professor Zoom (Eobard Thawne) appears as a mini-boss in DC Universe Online in the Gorilla Grodd duos and as a world boss roaming Central City in the "Lightning Strikes" DLC.
  • The Eobard Thawne version of Reverse-Flash appears a playable character in Lego Batman 3: Beyond Gotham
  • The Eobard Thawne version of Reverse-Flash appears as a DLC skin in Injustice 2.
  • The Eobard Thawne version of Reverse-Flash appears as a playable character in Lego DC Super-Villains, and The Flash version of Zoom appears in the DC TV Super-Villains DLC pack.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Inertia . . . ! - Page 4 - The Comic Bloc Forums". Comicbloc.com. Archived from the original on 2011-07-18. Retrieved 2011-04-25.
  2. ^ Holmes, Adam (2015). "The Flash: Dr. Wells Just Revealed His Biggest Secrets". Cinemablend.
  3. ^ Dyce, Andrew (2015). "Eobard Thawne: 'The Flash's Best Twist, or Its Worst?". Screenrant.
  4. ^ Bucksbaum, Sydney (July 23, 2016). "Comic-Con: 'Legends of Tomorrow' to Tackle Legion of Doom Villain Team In Season 2". The Hollywood Reporter.
  5. ^ Schneider, Michael (September 9, 2016). "Greg Berlanti Interview: How TV's Superhero Guru is Managing Crossovers, 'Supergirl's Move and New Inspirations". Indiewire. Archived from the original on November 17, 2016. Retrieved November 10, 2016.
  6. ^ Abrams, Natalie (February 23, 2016). "The Flash reveals Zoom's identity!". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved February 23, 2016.
  7. ^ Burlingame, Russ. "Teddy Sears On What Makes The Flash Great, The Zoom Twist, and This Week's Big Episode". Comicbook.com. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  8. ^ Abrams, Natalie (January 26, 2016). "Did The Flash just reveal Zoom's identity?". EW.com. Retrieved April 26, 2016.
  9. ^ Schremph, Kelly (February 2, 2016). "Is Hunter Zolomon Zoom On 'The Flash'? Jay Garrick's Earth-1 Doppelgänger Has A Meaningful Name". Bustle. Retrieved November 25, 2016.
  10. ^ "Zoom Confirmed As Flash Season Two's Villain". ComicBook.com. July 12, 2015. Retrieved August 24, 2015.
  11. ^ Ching, Albert (August 31, 2015). ""The Flash" Casts the Voice of Zoom for Season 2". Comic Book Resources. Retrieved August 31, 2015.
  12. ^ The Many Faces of Zoom featurette. Warner Bros. Home Entertainment.
  13. ^ "Versus Zoom on New 'The Flash' Tonight". Entertainment Alley. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  14. ^ Andrew Dyce (January 28, 2016). "The Flash's Twist Explained: Who is Hunter Zolomon?". Screen Rant. Retrieved April 15, 2017.
  15. ^ "SDCC: "The Flash" Reveals "Zoom" as Season Two Villain, Comic-Con Reel Released". Comic Book Resources. May 11, 2015. Retrieved February 25, 2016.
  16. ^ Crystal Bell (January 19, 2016). "The Inside Story Of How 'The Flash' Created TV's Most Terrifying Villain". MTV News. Retrieved February 12, 2018.
  17. ^ "Flashback S3 Ep.1: Exclusive Interview with Teddy Sears". YouTube. April 24, 2017.
  18. ^ Allstetter, Rob (January 27, 2010). "Kate Jewell interviews Michael Jelenic". Comics Continuum. Retrieved 2011-04-25.
  19. ^ "The Flashpoint Paradox spins an alternative tale". IGN. Retrieved February 15, 2017.

External links

Black Flash

The Black Flash is a fictional comic book character from DC Comics. Created by writers Grant Morrison and Mark Millar, and artist Ron Wagner, the character had cameos in The Flash (vol. 2) #138 (June 1998), before appearing in full in The Flash #141 (September 1998).

Central City (DC Comics)

Central City is a fictional American city appearing in comic books published by DC Comics. It is the home of the Silver Age version of the Flash (Barry Allen), and first appeared in Showcase #4 in September–October 1956.

Cosmic treadmill

The cosmic treadmill is a fictional time travel device appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics. The treadmill first appears in The Flash #125, and its origin is never explained in the comics.

Daniel West (character)

Daniel "Danny" West is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics. The character was created by writers-artists Francis Manapul and Brian Buccellato, and first appeared in The Flash #0 (cover dated November 2012). He is also the most recent character to take up the mantle of the Reverse-Flash.

Introduced in the post–Flashpoint universe of The New 52, Daniel is introduced as the younger brother of Iris West. Shortly after an encounter with the Rogues, Daniel is involved in an accident with the Speed Force, and is granted powers. Wishing to repair his strained relationship with Iris, Daniel decides to kill people affected by the Speed Force to take their speed and travel back in time, in order to kill his abusive father. However, his plans were foiled by the Flash / Barry Allen, and he lost his abilities.

Regaining his powers, he was forced into the Suicide Squad. Danny was apparently killed when, while throwing a bomb out into the ocean, it detonated.

Despite his death, Daniel continues to play a role in DC Rebirth, where it is revealed that despite being originally presented as Wallace West's uncle, he was actually his biological father.

Eobard Thawne

Eobard Thawne, otherwise known as Professor Zoom and the Reverse-Flash, is a fictional supervillain appearing in comic books published by DC Comics. Created by John Broome and Carmine Infantino, he made his debut in The Flash #139 (September 1963). The most well-known character to assume the "Reverse-Flash" mantle, Thawne is the archenemy of Barry Allen (the second superhero to be called the Flash), a descendant of Malcolm Thawne, and a maternal forefather of Bart Allen, Thaddeus Thawne, and Owen Mercer. He has been established as one of the fastest speedsters in the DC Universe.

IGN ranked Eobard Thawne as the 31st Greatest Comic Book Villain Of All Time in 2009 and #2 on their Top 5 Flash Villains list in 2015. Tom Cavanagh and Matt Letscher have portrayed the character on various television series set within the CW's live-action Arrowverse.

Flash (comics)

The Flash (or simply Flash) is the name of several superheroes appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics. Created by writer Gardner Fox and artist Harry Lampert, the original Flash first appeared in Flash Comics #1 (cover date January 1940/release month November 1939). Nicknamed the "Scarlet Speedster", all incarnations of the Flash possess "super speed", which includes the ability to run, move, and think extremely fast, use superhuman reflexes, and seemingly violate certain laws of physics.

Thus far, at least four different characters—each of whom somehow gained the power of "the speed force"—have assumed the mantle of the Flash in DC's history: college athlete Jay Garrick (1940–1951, 1961–2011, 2017–present), forensic scientist Barry Allen (1956–1985, 2008–present), Barry's nephew Wally West (1986–2011, 2016–present), and Barry's grandson Bart Allen (2006–2007). Each incarnation of the Flash has been a key member of at least one of DC's premier teams: the Justice Society of America, the Justice League, and the Teen Titans.

The Flash is one of DC Comics' most popular characters and has been integral to the publisher's many reality-changing "crisis" storylines over the years. The original meeting of the Golden Age Flash Jay Garrick and Silver Age Flash Barry Allen in "Flash of Two Worlds" (1961) introduced the Multiverse storytelling concept to DC readers, which would become the basis for many DC stories in the years to come.

Like his Justice League colleagues Wonder Woman, Superman and Batman, the Flash has a distinctive cast of adversaries, including the various Rogues (unique among DC supervillains for their code of honor) and the various psychopathic "speedsters" who go by the names Reverse-Flash or Zoom. Other supporting characters in Flash stories include Barry's wife Iris West, Wally's wife Linda Park, Bart's girlfriend Valerie Perez, friendly fellow speedster Max Mercury, and Central City police department members David Singh and Patty Spivot.

A staple of the comic book DC Universe, the Flash has been adapted to numerous DC films, video games, animated series, and live-action television shows. In live action, Barry Allen has been portrayed by Rod Haase for the 1979 television special Legends of the Superheroes, John Wesley Shipp in the 1990 The Flash series and Grant Gustin in the 2014 The Flash series, and by Ezra Miller in the DC Extended Universe series of films, beginning with Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016). Shipp also portrays a version of Jay Garrick in the 2014 The Flash series. The various incarnations of the Flash also feature in animated series such as Superman: The Animated Series, Justice League, Batman: The Brave and the Bold and Young Justice, as well as the DC Universe Animated Original Movies series.

Flashpoint (comics)

Flashpoint is a 2011 comic book crossover story arc published by DC Comics. Consisting of an eponymous core limited series and a number of tie-in titles, the storyline premiered in May 2011. The core miniseries was written by Geoff Johns and pencilled by Andy Kubert. In its end, the series radically changes the status quo for the DC Universe leading into the publisher's 2011 relaunch, the New 52.

Flashpoint details an altered DC Universe in which only Barry Allen seems to be aware of significant differences between the regular timeline and the altered one, including Cyborg's place as the world's quintessential hero much like how Superman is in the main timeline, with Superman himself being held captive as a lab-rat by the United States government within an underground facility in Metropolis. In addition, Thomas Wayne is Batman, and a war between Wonder Woman and Aquaman has decimated western Europe.Consisting of a 61 issue run, the series crossed over with Booster Gold, sixteen separate three-issue miniseries, and a number of one-shots beginning in June 2011. DC announced that Flash #12 would be the last in the series; a thirteenth issue had been announced for sale on May 25, 2011, but was withdrawn.The storyline is loosely adapted in the film Justice League: The Flashpoint Paradox as well as in the third season of the CW network television series The Flash. At the 2017 San Diego Comic-Con, it was announced that Flashpoint will be adapted into a feature film as part of the DC Extended Universe.

Hunter Zolomon

Hunter Zolomon, otherwise known as Zoom, is a fictional supervillain appearing in comic books published by DC Comics. The second character to assume the Reverse-Flash mantle, he serves as the archenemy of Wally West (the third superhero to be called the Flash).

In 2009, IGN ranked Zoom as the 37th Greatest Comic Book Villain Of All Time. The character made his live-action debut on The CW's television series The Flash, portrayed by Teddy Sears while voiced by Tony Todd.

List of Legends of Tomorrow characters

Legends of Tomorrow is an American television series, developed by Greg Berlanti, Marc Guggenheim, Phil Klemmer, and Andrew Kreisberg, based on several characters from DC Comics. The series premiered in the United States on January 21, 2016, for The CW television network, and it finished its first season on May 19, 2016. The second season premiered in October 2016 and ended in April 2017, while the third season premiered in October 2017 and is concluded in April 2018.

Legends of Tomorrow follows Time Master Rip Hunter (Arthur Darvill) whose mission is to stop Vandal Savage (Casper Crump) from killing his wife and child, and destroying the world. The team members (The Legends) who join Rip in the first season are: Martin Stein (Victor Garber); Ray Palmer / The Atom (Brandon Routh); Sara Lance / White Canary (Caity Lotz); Jefferson Jackson (Franz Drameh); Kendra Saunders / Hawkgirl (Ciara Renée); Carter Hall / Hawkman (Falk Hentschel); Mick Rory / Heat Wave (Dominic Purcell); and Leonard Snart / Captain Cold (Wentworth Miller). Amy Pemberton voices the A. I. Gideon. At the end of the season, Snart sacrifices himself to save the Legends and Kendra and Carter depart following Savage's defeat. The second season focuses on the remaining Legends fixing points in time that have been changed, called "aberrations"; they are joined by historian Nate Heywood / Steel (Nick Zano) and Justice Society of America member Amaya Jiwe / Vixen (Maisie Richardson-Sellers), and are pitted against the Legion of Doom, composed of Eobard Thawne / Reverse-Flash (Matt Letscher), Damien Darhk (Neal McDonough), Malcolm Merlyn (John Barrowman) and a time-displaced Snart. At the end of the season, Rip departs following the Legion's defeat. The third season focuses on the Legends repairing anachronisms they have caused through time during their final battle with the Legion of Doom. In addition, they deal with Rip Hunter's Time Bureau, and stalked by a demonic entity, Mallus, whose disciple, Nora, has resurrected Damien Darhk, her father, and Amaya's future granddaughter Kuasa. The team is joined by computer hacker Zari Adrianna Tomaz (Tala Ashe) and speedster Wally West / Kid Flash (Keiynan Lonsdale). During the season, Martin dies during the Earth-X invasion and Jefferson departs following Martin's death. At the end of the season, Amaya departs following Mallus's defeat. The fourth season focuses on the Legends dealing with the fugitives - a group of monsters of mythic origins that were released when they freed Mallus in order to defeat him being scattered throughout time. The team is joined by Occult detective John Constantine (Matt Ryan) and shape-shifter fugitive Charlie (Maisie Richardson-Sellers). Before the season, Wally has departed to focus on himself, while Nate departs to work for the Time Bureau.

The following is a list of characters that have appeared on the television series. Many are named for, or are based on DC Comics characters.

List of The Flash characters

The Flash is an American television series developed by Greg Berlanti, Andrew Kreisberg and Geoff Johns, based on the DC Comics character the Flash. The series premiered on The CW television network in the United States on October 7, 2014, and is currently in its fifth season. The series is a spin-off from Arrow, a show set in the same fictional universe.

The first season follows police forensic investigator Barry Allen (Grant Gustin), who develops super-speed after he is struck by lightning. He is assisted by S.T.A.R. Labs' Dr. Caitlin Snow (Danielle Panabaker), Cisco Ramon (Carlos Valdes), and Dr. Harrison Wells (Tom Cavanagh) in his attempts to use his powers for good and solve the murder of his mother by a superhuman attacker. The murder investigation unjustly imprisoned his father (John Wesley Shipp), leaving detective Joe West (Jesse L. Martin), father of his best friend, Iris (Candice Patton), to take in the young Barry. The memory of his mother's murder and his father's framing later motivates Barry to put his personal needs aside and use his powers to fight against those who hurt the innocent, thus, shaping him into the Flash.

The following is a list of characters who have appeared in the television series. Many of the characters appearing in the series are based on DC Comics characters.

List of metahumans in DC Comics

List of metahumans in DC Comics, is a list of fictional superhumans that have appeared in comic book titles published by DC Comics, as well as properties from other media are listed below, with appropriately brief descriptions and accompanying citations.

Matt Letscher

Matthew Letscher (born June 26, 1970) is an American actor and playwright, known for his roles as Captain Harrison Love in the 1998 American swashbuckler film The Mask of Zorro and as Colonel Adelbert Ames in the 2003 American film Gods and Generals. He co-starred in the 2016 Michael Bay film 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi, playing Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens. He has also portrayed Eobard Thawne / Reverse-Flash in The Flash and Legends of Tomorrow.

The Button (comics)

"The Button" is a 2017 comic book crossover created and published by DC Comics. The story arc consists of four issues from DC's Batman and Flash publications, functioning in part as a larger buildup towards the "Doomsday Clock" event. The plot was written by Joshua Williamson and Tom King, with art by Jason Fabok and Howard Porter.

In the story, Batman and Flash work together to uncover the truth behind the mysterious button found in the Batcave. As the investigation unfolds, the secrets of the Button bring about the wrath of the Reverse Flash as well as the unknown orchestrator of DC Rebirth.

The Flash (season 1)

The first season of the American television series The Flash premiered on The CW on October 7, 2014 and concluded on May 19, 2015 after airing 23 episodes. The series is based on the DC Comics character Barry Allen / Flash, a costumed superhero crime-fighter with the power to move at superhuman speeds. It is a spin-off from Arrow, existing in the same fictional universe, and was produced by Berlanti Productions, Warner Bros. Television, and DC Entertainment, with Andrew Kreisberg serving as showrunner.

The series follows Allen, portrayed by Grant Gustin, a crime scene investigator who gains super-human speed, which he uses to fight criminals, including others who have also gained superhuman abilities. Gustin is joined by main cast members Candice Patton, Danielle Panabaker, Rick Cosnett, Carlos Valdes, Tom Cavanagh, and Jesse L. Martin. The Flash was picked up for a full season by The CW in October 2014, and filming took place primarily in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

The series premiere was watched by 4.8 million viewers and had a 1.9 18–49 demographic rating, making it The CW's most watched and highest rated series premiere since The Vampire Diaries in 2009. It also became The CW's second-most watched series premiere ever, behind 90210, and the third-highest rated in the 18–49 demographic. The first season finished as the 118th ranked show, with an average viewership of 4.62 million, making it the most watched series ever on The CW, and also the highest rated series among men 18–49 and men 18+ ever on the network. The first season of The Flash received generally positive reviews from critics. Reviews for the series became increasingly positive as the season progressed, with the finale receiving critical acclaim. The series was renewed for a second season on January 11, 2015.

The Flash (season 2)

The second season of the American television series The Flash, which is based on the DC Comics character Barry Allen / Flash, sees Barry recognized as a hero in Central City after saving the city, only to face a new threat from a parallel universe in the form of the speedster Zoom, who seeks to eliminate everyone connected to the Speed Force throughout the multiverse. It is set in the Arrowverse, sharing continuity with the other television series of the universe, and is a spin-off of Arrow. The season was produced by Berlanti Productions, Warner Bros. Television, and DC Entertainment, with Andrew Kreisberg, Gabrielle Stanton, Aaron Helbing, and Todd Helbing serving as showrunners.

The season was ordered in January 2015, and filmed from that July to the following April in Vancouver. Grant Gustin stars as Barry, alongside principal cast members Candice Patton, Danielle Panabaker, Carlos Valdes, Tom Cavanagh, and Jesse L. Martin also returning from the first season, and are joined by Keiynan Lonsdale. This season also introduces characters from Legends of Tomorrow, which was being developed as a spin-off.

The first episode of the season premiered on October 6, 2015, with the season, consisting of 23 episodes, airing on The CW until May 24, 2016. The premiere was watched by 3.58 million viewers, down from the first season premiere but average for the series. The second season of The Flash received universal acclaim from critics, and finished as the 112th ranked show, slightly up from season one, with an average viewership of 4.25 million. The series was renewed for a third season on March 11, 2016.

Tina McGee

Tina McGee is a fictional character appearing in The Flash comic book series published by DC Comics. She first appeared in Flash (vol. 2) #3. Tina McGee is a nutritionist and researcher for STAR Labs.

Tina McGee made her live action debut in the 1990 television series The Flash as part of the main cast portrayed by Amanda Pays. Pays returned to portray a different version of Tina McGee as a recurring character in The CW television series The Flash.

Wallace West (comics)

Wallace West is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe. Originally introduced as a new interpretation of Wally West, as part of DC's The New 52 relaunch, the comic DC Rebirth #1 later established that he is, in fact, a new character of the same name, being Wally's cousin, both named after their great-grandfather. To avoid confusion, the character was renamed in later comics as Wallace West.

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