René Arnoux

René Alexandre Arnoux (born 4 July 1948)[1] is a French former racing driver who competed in 12 Formula One seasons (1978 to 1989). He participated in 165 World Championship Grands Prix (149 starts) winning seven of them, achieving 22 podium finishes and scoring 181 career points. His best finish in the World Drivers' Championship was third in 1983 for Ferrari. In 1977, Arnoux won the European Formula Two Championship. In 2006 he raced in the inaugural season of the Grand Prix Masters series for retired F1 drivers.

René Arnoux
Rene Arnoux WSR2008 HU
Arnoux in 2008
Born4 July 1948 (age 71)
Pontcharra, Isère, France
Formula One World Championship career
NationalityFrance French
Active years19781989
TeamsMartini, Surtees, Renault, Ferrari, Ligier
Entries165 (149 starts)
Championships0
Wins7
Podiums22
Career points181
Pole positions18
Fastest laps12
First entry1978 South African Grand Prix
First win1980 Brazilian Grand Prix
Last win1983 Dutch Grand Prix
Last entry1989 Australian Grand Prix

Early career

Arnoux's career began in Formule Renault and he first moved into Formula Two in 1974 with Elf, taking fourth place on his debut at Nogaro.[1] In 1975 he moved to Formule Super Renault and won the title.[1] For 1976, Arnoux moved back to Formula Two with an Elf-sponsored, works Martini-Renault, winning three races and narrowly losing the title to Jean-Pierre Jabouille.[1] However, he won the 1977 European Championship, again driving a Martini-Renault.[1] Arnoux won races at Silverstone, Hockenheim, Pau and Nogaro, which along with second places at Enna-Pergusa and Estoril saw him finish 12 points clear of American Eddie Cheever who was driving for Ron Dennis' Project Four Racing, and 14 points clear of teammate Didier Pironi.

Formula One

Martini / Surtees

Arnoux continued with the Martini team when it made the transition to Formula One in 1978. However, in an organisation with insufficient means to compete in the highest echelon of the sport, Arnoux was unable to demonstrate his abilities and Martini abandoned Formula One during the season, having run short of money. Arnoux's best finishes for Martini were two 9th places in Belgium and Austria. He failed to qualify in South Africa, and failed to pre-qualify in Monaco and Germany.

Arnoux moved to Surtees for the last two races of the season, but once again found himself in a team on the edge of failure. Unlike team owner John Surtees who had won the F1 World Championship in 1964, Team Surtees was rarely a front runner in Grand Prix racing. In his two races for the team Arnoux's best finish was his first race where he placed 9th at Watkins Glen for the United States Grand Prix. Arnoux qualified the Surtees TS20 in 21st place at Watkins Glen, while teammate Beppe Gabbiani failed to qualify. His last race for the team in Canada saw him qualify an encouraging 16th but retire just after half distance when the Ford DFV engine failed. Surtees would have liked to sign Arnoux on a permanent basis, but his few drives to date had demonstrated his potential to bigger teams and Arnoux signed with Renault for 1979.[1]

Renault RS01 Arnoux 2007
An ex-Jabouille Renault RS01 of 1979 being demonstrated by René Arnoux in 2007.

Renault

In the 1979 season, the factory Renault team entered two cars for the first time since its debut in 1977. The team's only victory of the year was taken by Arnoux's teammate Jean-Pierre Jabouille at the French Grand Prix at the Dijon-Prenois circuit,[2] but Arnoux took the headlines due to a fierce, but good-natured wheel-banging battle with the Flat-12 Ferrari of Gilles Villeneuve for second place. Ultimately Villeneuve would just hold off Arnoux to take second place. Arnoux began to fulfil his potential in the second half of the season with 4 top-six finishes (3 podium places) whereas Jabouille's Dijon victory was his only points finish of the year.[2][3]

In 1980, Arnoux took his first two Formula One victories, the first being at a much-protested Interlagos circuit in Brazil but a lack of reliability prevented him from playing a part in the fight for the world title, although he took three pole positions. His second win came in the very next race at the Kyalami circuit in South Africa[3] where the thinner air at high altitude saw the turbocharged Renault RE20 have a power advantage over its mostly Cosworth powered rivals. At that point in the season Arnoux was leading the World Championship for the first time. He would not lose the championship lead until Round 6 in Monaco. The season though was punctuated by unreliability from the turbocharged Renault V6 engine, though progress was rapidly moving forward with the V6 proving powerful, producing approximately 510 bhp (380 kW; 517 PS) to be on par with Ferrari (and considerably more powerful than the 475 bhp (354 kW; 482 PS) Ford DFV). What generally hurt the Renaults was unreliability, and the lack of ground effects. Although he would later finish in a fine second in the Dutch Grand Prix at Zandvoort, he would finish the season in 6th place with 29 points, 38 points behind World Champion Alan Jones.

Arnoux's situation was complicated in 1981 by the arrival of Alain Prost at Renault. Inevitably their rivalry on track flared up off the track and relations between the two men deteriorated, dividing the small world of French motorsport. The conflict reached its peak at the 1982 French Grand Prix at the Circuit Paul Ricard. The drivers took the first one-two in Renault's history in Formula One, Arnoux finishing ahead of Prost. Prost was furious, considering that his teammate had not kept to the team orders agreed before the race, according to which he should have ceded the win to Prost, who was better placed in the 1982 championship.[1] Arnoux replied that no orders had been given before the race and that he was free to drive his own race. He took one other win at the Italian Grand Prix at the end of the season. He was also lucky to walk away from a high speed crash after losing a wheel going into the banked Tarzan corner at the end of the long straight in the 1982 Dutch Grand Prix, though luckily his car's momentum was largely stopped by the sand trap and tyre barrier.

Arnoux Ferrari 126C4 1984 Dallas F1
Arnoux started at the back of the field for the 1984 Dallas Grand Prix, but climbed to second by the finish.

Ferrari

The pairing of Prost and Arnoux having become unsustainable, Arnoux left Renault at the end of 1982 to join the other factory team in Formula One, Ferrari in 1983, joining another French driver Patrick Tambay. Prior to the Canadian Grand Prix, rumours were flying that Arnoux's place at Ferrari was under threat. However, with three victories, at the Canadian, German, and Dutch Grands Prix, he was in contention for the world title for much of the season, but was left behind by his rivals Prost and Nelson Piquet in the championship run in.[1] Both Arnoux and Tambay became favourites with the Tifosi for their hard charging styles and results saw Ferrari win the Constructors' Championship. Arnoux's win at Zandvoort would prove to be the 7th and last win of his Formula One career.

With the McLarens of Prost and Niki Lauda dominating 1984, Arnoux had a less successful second season at Ferrari, only finishing 6th with 27 points, with his new teammate Michele Alboreto progressively taking the initiative and team leadership from him. After three wins and four pole positions in 1983, Arnoux failed to win or claim a pole position in 1984 (Alboreto won the Belgian Grand Prix from pole with Arnoux starting second and finishing third), though he still drove well on occasions, finishing second in San Marino and Dallas where he was forced to start from the pits due to an electrical fault on the warm up lap and managed to keep his car out of trouble on the crumbling track. The only Grand Prix ever held in Dallas was also the last time Arnoux achieved a Formula One podium finish. As the season progressed, Arnoux appeared to lack motivation[1] and after finishing 4th in the opening race of the 1985 championship in Brazil, an 'amicable separation'[1] was agreed between him and Ferrari. His place in the team was taken by Swedish driver Stefan Johansson. He was seen in the Brabham pits at Imola in Round 3, sparking rumours he was set to join the team then owned by Bernie Ecclestone, but nothing came of it and he was rarely seen at races for the rest of the season.

Ligier

Without a drive for the rest of the 1985 season, Arnoux made his return to Formula One in 1986 for the French Ligier team who were using turbocharged Renault engines, where he delivered several good performances. However, despite maintaining his motivation, the Pirelli-tyred Ligiers were not competitive as the season progressed. Arnoux had two teammates in 1986. For the first half of the season his teammate was French driver Jacques Laffite. However, Laffite's career ended when he broke both of his legs in a first corner crash at Brands Hatch in the British Grand Prix. From the following race Laffite was replaced with yet another French driver, the fast but accident prone Philippe Alliot.

For 1987, Ligier were to have exclusive use of a new, 850 bhp (634 kW; 862 PS) four-cylinder turbocharged Alfa Romeo engine in the new Ligier JS29.[4] However, after Arnoux compared the engine to "used food" during pre-season testing, Alfa's parent company Fiat pulled the plug on the project and Ligier were forced into using the four-cylinder Megatron engines for the season and there was little to show for it in the way of results despite the Megatron (the old BMW M12/13 engine) producing around 950 bhp (708 kW; 963 PS).[5] Arnoux scored the team's only point during the season with a 6th place in Belgium. The race at Spa also saw the best finish for his teammate Piercarlo Ghinzani who finished 7th.

1988 was to prove the final year for turbos in Formula One and Ligier took the chance to race the new, 3.5-litre Judd V8 engine. The Ligier JS31 proved to be a disaster though with both Arnoux and new teammate Stefan Johansson struggling, often only just making it onto the grid or simply failing to qualify, with both drivers often complaining that even in dry conditions the lack of grip saw them forced to drive with a wet weather technique. Although he only failed to qualify twice during the season (San Marino and France – Johansson failed to make the grid 6 times), his best finish of the year was a disappointing 10th place in the Portuguese Grand Prix. It was the first time since his debut season in 1978 that Arnoux failed to score a World Championship point. His DNQ at Imola was the first time he had failed to qualify for a race since the 1981 Belgian Grand Prix. His season finished on a sour note when he took out race leader Gerhard Berger while being lapped at the 1988 Australian Grand Prix (though of all the experts and commentators who blamed Arnoux for taking out Berger's Ferrari in Adelaide and ruining the race as a spectacle, Berger himself refused to do so, citing a "very long" brake pedal after his hot pace which meant he couldn't stop to avoid Arnoux, nor pass him more easily as he normally would have. He also cited the fact that with his turbo boost turned up to full, the Ferrari would have run out of fuel long before the race ended).

Arnoux's fall to the back of the grid didn't change in 1989, despite the new Ford DFR powered Ligier JS33 showing promise. Towards the end of his career, Arnoux had attracted some controversy; he was frequently accused of not using his mirrors and blocking faster cars in qualifying and when being lapped (a trait he seemingly passed on to his 1989 rookie teammate Olivier Grouillard), even taking off a number of cars as well. During the 1989 Monaco Grand Prix, BBC commentator Murray Walker remarked that Arnoux's claimed reason for going so slow at that stage of his career was that he was used to turbo powered cars and that the naturally aspirated cars were "a completely different kettle of fish to drive — he says". Walker's co-commentator, 1976 World Champion James Hunt's reply was typically blunt as he said "And all I can say to that is bullshit".[6] Arnoux received criticism after the race for continually ignoring the blue flags, with former Renault teammate Prost in particular held up by the Ligier which refused to let the McLaren past for a number of laps. This cost Prost some 20 seconds in his pursuit of teammate Ayrton Senna and for a number of laps the Ligier had a crocodile line of cars behind him as he refused to move over and let faster cars through.[7]

Arnoux finished his career with 181 World Championship points, with his last points coming from a 5th place at the 1989 Canadian Grand Prix. His last race was the very wet 1989 Australian Grand Prix in Adelaide where his Ligier was pushed into retirement by the Arrows of Eddie Cheever after just 4 laps. Showing he still had skill as a driver, Arnoux was second fastest to the McLaren-Honda of outgoing World Champion, pole man and acknowledged rain master Ayrton Senna in the extra half-hour warm-up that was scheduled to let drivers and teams set up their cars for what would be a wet race after three days of typically sunny Australian weather.

Post career

René Arnoux has since started an indoor karting business called Kart'in, consisting of four tracks in France, two in the Parisian area, one in the suburbs of Lyons and one near Marseille. He also owns and manages two factories, frequently appears and drives in historical events on behalf of Renault and resides in Paris.

Arnoux was one of the drivers invited to take part in the Grand Prix Masters championship in 2006 and 2007, restricted to former Formula One drivers. In 2007 and 2008 he drove for the Renault H&C Classic Team, when he presented and drove Alain Prost's F1 car from 1983 at World Series by Renault events.

Racing record

Complete European F5000 Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap.)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Pos. Pts
1974 Tony Kitchiner McLaren M19A Chevrolet 5.0 V8 BRH MAL SIL OUL BRH ZOL THR
Ret
ZAN MUG MNZ MAL MON THR BRH OUL SNE MAL BRH NC 0

Complete European Formula Two Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Pos. Pts
1974 Ecurie Elf Alpine A367 BMW BAR HOC PAU SAL HOC MUG KAR PER HOC VAL
Ret
NC 0
1976 Automobiles Martini Martini Mk 16 Renault HOC
2
THR
7
2nd 52
Martini Mk 19 VAL
Ret
SAL
4
PAU
1
HOC
5
ROU
10
MUG
2
PER
1
EST
1
NOG
Ret
HOC
3
1977 Equipe Renault Elf Martini Mk 22 Renault SIL
1
THR
Ret
HOC
2
NÜR
5
VAL
Ret
PAU
1
MUG
16
ROU
Ret
NOG
1
PER
2
MIS
Ret
EST
2
DON
6
1st 52

Complete Formula One World Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position, Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 WDC Pts
1978 Automobiles Martini Martini MK23 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 ARG BRA RSA
DNQ
USW MON
DNPQ
BEL
9
ESP SWE FRA
14
GBR GER
DNPQ
AUT
9
NED
Ret
ITA NC 0
Durex Team Surtees Surtees TS20 USA
9
CAN
Ret
1979 Equipe Renault Elf Renault RS01 Renault-Gordini EF1 1.5 V6t ARG
Ret
BRA
Ret
RSA
Ret
USW
DNS
ESP
9
BEL
Ret
8th 17
Renault RS10 MON
Ret
FRA
3
GBR
2
GER
Ret
AUT
6
NED
Ret
ITA
Ret
CAN
Ret
USA
2
1980 Equipe Renault Elf Renault RE20 Renault-Gordini EF1 1.5 V6t ARG
Ret
BRA
1
RSA
1
USW
9
BEL
4
MON
Ret
FRA
5
GBR
NC
GER
Ret
AUT
9
NED
2
ITA
10
CAN
Ret
USA
7
6th 29
1981 Equipe Renault Elf Renault RE20B Renault-Gordini EF1 1.5 V6t USW
8
BRA
Ret
ARG
5
SMR
8
BEL
DNQ
9th 11
Renault RE30 MON
Ret
ESP
9
FRA
4
GBR
9
GER
13
AUT
2
NED
Ret
ITA
Ret
CAN
Ret
CPL
Ret
1982 Equipe Renault Elf Renault RE30B Renault-Gordini EF1 1.5 V6t RSA
3
BRA
Ret
USW
Ret
SMR
Ret
BEL
Ret
MON
Ret
DET
10
CAN
Ret
NED
Ret
GBR
Ret
FRA
1
GER
2
AUT
Ret
SUI
16
ITA
1
CPL
Ret
6th 28
1983 Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 126C2B Ferrari 021 1.5 V6t BRA
10
USW
3
FRA
7
SMR
3
MON
Ret
BEL
Ret
DET
Ret
CAN
1
GBR
5
3rd 49
Ferrari 126C3 GER
1
AUT
2
NED
1
ITA
2
EUR
9
RSA
Ret
1984 Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 126C4 Ferrari 031 1.5 V6t BRA
Ret
RSA
Ret
BEL
3
SMR
2
FRA
4
MON
3
CAN
5
DET
Ret
DAL
2
GBR
6
GER
6
AUT
7
NED
11
ITA
Ret
EUR
5
POR
9
6th 27
1985 Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 156/85 Ferrari 031 1.5 V6t BRA
4
POR SMR MON CAN DET FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA BEL EUR RSA AUS 17th 3
1986 Equipe Ligier Ligier JS27 Renault EF4B 1.5 V6t BRA
4
ESP
Ret
SMR
Ret
MON
5
BEL
Ret
CAN
6
DET
Ret
FRA
5
GBR
4
GER
4
HUN
Ret
AUT
10
ITA
Ret
POR
7
MEX
15
AUS
7
10th 14
1987 Ligier Loto Ligier JS29B Megatron M12/13 1.5 L4t BRA SMR
DNS
BEL
6
MON
11
DET
10
19th 1
Ligier JS29C FRA
Ret
GBR
Ret
GER
Ret
HUN
Ret
AUT
10
ITA
10
POR
Ret
ESP
Ret
MEX
Ret
JPN
Ret
AUS
Ret
1988 Ligier Loto Ligier JS31 Judd CV 3.5 V8 BRA
Ret
SMR
DNQ
MON
Ret
MEX
Ret
CAN
Ret
DET
Ret
FRA
DNQ
GBR
18
GER
17
HUN
Ret
BEL
Ret
ITA
13
POR
10
ESP
Ret
JPN
17
AUS
Ret
NC 0
1989 Ligier Loto Ligier JS33 Ford Cosworth DFR 3.5 V8 BRA
DNQ
SMR
DNQ
MON
12
MEX
14
USA
DNQ
CAN
5
FRA
Ret
GBR
DNQ
GER
11
HUN
DNQ
BEL
Ret
ITA
9
POR
13
ESP
DNQ
JPN
DNQ
AUS
Ret
23rd 2
  • Race was stopped with less than 75% of laps completed, half points awarded.

Complete Formula One Non-Championship results

(key) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1
1978 Automobiles Martini Martini MK23 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 INT
DNS
1983 Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 126C2B Ferrari 021 1.5 V6t ROC
Ret

24 Hours of Le Mans results

Year Team Co-Drivers Car Class Laps Pos. Class
Pos.
1977 France J. Haran de Chaunac France Didier Pironi
France Guy Fréquelin
Renault Alpine A442 S
+2.0
0 DNF DNF
1994 France Rent-a-Car Racing Team United Kingdom Justin Bell
France Bertrand Balas
Dodge Viper RT/10 GT1 273 12th 3rd
1995 United States Euromotorsport Racing Inc. Italy Massimo Sigala
United States Jay Cochran
Ferrari 333 SP WSC 7 DNF DNF
Source:[8]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Small, Steve (1994). The Guinness Complete Grand Prix Who's Who. Guinness. p. 32. ISBN 0851127029.
  2. ^ a b Small, Steve (1994). The Guinness Complete Grand Prix Who's Who. Guinness. p. 201. ISBN 0851127029.
  3. ^ a b Small, Steve (1994). The Guinness Complete Grand Prix Who's Who. Guinness. p. 33. ISBN 0851127029.
  4. ^ "Engine Alfa Romeo". www.statsf1.com. Retrieved 27 May 2017.
  5. ^ "Engine Megatron". www.statsf1.com. Retrieved 27 May 2017.
  6. ^ Wendler, Andrew (20 September 2013). "10 Things You Need to Know About James Hunt Before Seeing Rush". Car and Driver. Hearst Communications, Inc. Retrieved 22 April 2018.
  7. ^ Murray Walker & James Hunt on René Arnoux at 1989 Monaco GP on YouTube
  8. ^ "All Results of René Arnoux". racingsportscars.com. Retrieved September 21, 2017.

Sources

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Jean-Pierre Jabouille
European Formula Two
Champion

1977
Succeeded by
Bruno Giacomelli
1976 European Formula Two Championship

The 1976 European Formula Two season was contested over 12 rounds. Équipe Elf Switzerland driver Jean-Pierre Jabouille clinched the championship title.

1977 European Formula Two Championship

The 1977 European Formula Two season was contested over 13 rounds. Frenchman René Arnoux was the season champion, driving a Martini-Renault/Gordini for Ecurie Renault Elf.

1979 French Grand Prix

The 1979 French Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 1 July 1979 at Dijon.

It marked the first victory of a turbocharged car in Formula One, with Renault overcoming the reliability problems that had initially plagued their car. For Jean-Pierre Jabouille it was a victory on home soil, driving a French car (Renault), on French tyres (Michelin), powered by a French engine (Renault), burning French fuel (Elf). Jabouille was the first Frenchman to win the French Grand Prix since Jean-Pierre Wimille in 1948.

The race is perhaps best remembered for one of the fiercest battles ever for second place, between Ferrari driver Gilles Villeneuve and Renault driver René Arnoux, who on several occasions during the final laps touched wheels and swapped positions. The fight is often cited as one of the most memorable pieces of racing in Formula One. Villeneuve, who passed the finish line less than a quarter of a second ahead of Arnoux, later described the occasion as "my best memory of Grand Prix racing".

1980 Austrian Grand Prix

The 1980 Austrian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 17 August 1980 at the Österreichring circuit in Austria. It was the tenth race of the 1980 Formula One season. The race was the 13th Austrian Grand Prix and the eleventh to be held at the Österreichring. The race was held over 54 laps of the 5.942-kilometre circuit for a total race distance of 321 kilometres.

The race was won by French driver, Jean-Pierre Jabouille driving a Renault RE20. The win was Jabouille's second and last Formula One Grand Prix victory. It was also his first points finish in over a year since his previous victory at the 1979 French Grand Prix. It would also be the last points finish of his career. Jabouille won by eight-tenths of a second over Australian driver Alan Jones driving a Williams FW07B. Third was Jones' Williams Grand Prix Engineering team mate, Argentinian driver Carlos Reutemann.

At the high-altitude circuit the turbocharged Renaults dominated qualifying, with René Arnoux securing pole over Jabouille but Jones won the start, leading until Arnoux took over on lap 3. Arnoux pitted for tyres on lap 21 handing Jabouille a lead he only just kept and Jones fell just short as Jabouille limped home on wrecked tyres.

Behind Reutemann, French driver Jacques Laffite was fourth in his Ligier JS11/15 with Brazilian driver Nelson Piquet (Brabham BT49) and Italian driver Elio de Angelis (Lotus 81) completing the points finishers. Team Lotus ran a third car for debutant British driver Nigel Mansell. The future world champion retired with a broken engine after 40 laps and suffering burns after he raced in overalls soaked in fuel after a pre-race incident. West German driver Jochen Mass did not make the start, crashing and rolling his Arrows A3 and injuring himself in practice.

Jones now led Piquet by eleven points, Reutemann by 17 and Laffite by 19. Williams now led Ligier in the constructors' championship by 26 points and Brabham by 41.

1981 Austrian Grand Prix

The 1981 Austrian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Österreichring on 16 August 1981. It was the eleventh race of the 1981 Formula One World Championship.The 53-lap race was won by Frenchman Jacques Laffite, driving a Ligier-Matra. Compatriot René Arnoux finished second in a Renault, having started from pole position, with Brazilian Nelson Piquet third in a Brabham-Ford. Piquet moved to within six points of Drivers' Championship leader, Argentine Carlos Reutemann, who finished fifth in his Williams-Ford.

1982 Dutch Grand Prix

The 1982 Dutch Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Zandvoort on 3 July 1982. The race, contested over 72 laps, was the ninth race of the 1982 Formula One season and was won by Didier Pironi, driving a Ferrari, with Nelson Piquet second in a Brabham-BMW and Keke Rosberg third in a Williams-Ford.

René Arnoux started from pole position, but he crashed out at the notorious Tarzan Corner when his Renault's throttle stuck open and he hit the tyre barriers. Arnoux walked away from the crash unharmed.

This was the first Grand Prix after the death of Riccardo Paletti three weeks earlier in Montreal. This was also the final win of Didier Pironi's Formula One career at this race.

Ferrari entered Patrick Tambay to replace Gilles Villeneuve, who had been killed during qualifying a few race weekends prior, at the Belgian Grand Prix.

1982 Italian Grand Prix

The 1982 Italian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Monza on 12 September 1982. This was the final pole position, podium, finish, and points for 1978 World Champion Mario Andretti at this race. René Arnoux won the race. Arnoux announced he would be a Ferrari driver the following season. Arnoux finished ahead of his Ferrari teammate in 1983 Patrick Tambay, and Mario Andretti in the second Ferrari finished third. John Watson's fourth place put him 9 points behind Keke Rosberg with an outside chance of winning the Drivers' Title at the final race at Caesars Palace, where Ferrari, McLaren, and Renault would battle for the Constructors' Title.

1982 Monaco Grand Prix

The 1982 Monaco Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Monaco on 23 May 1982. It was the sixth race of the 1982 FIA Formula One World Championship.

This was the first race following the death of Gilles Villeneuve at the Belgian Grand Prix two weeks previously. Consequently, Ferrari entered only one car, for Didier Pironi.

René Arnoux took pole position in his Renault and led until he spun off at the Swimming Pool on lap 15. Team-mate Alain Prost took over the lead and held it until the closing stages, when rain started to fall. On lap 74, three from the end, Prost pushed too hard and crashed into the Armco barriers coming out of the Chicane du Port (also known as the Dog Leg), handing the lead to Riccardo Patrese in the Brabham. Then, on lap 75, Patrese spun on oil at the Loews hairpin and stalled.

Pironi now led, only for his car to run out of fuel in the tunnel on the final lap. Andrea de Cesaris then ran out of fuel before he could pass Pironi, and Derek Daly, the next leader, had already lost the wings from his Williams after an accident and had also damaged his gearbox, which seized up before he could start the final lap. Patrese, who had managed to restart his car by rolling downhill and bump-starting, came through to take his first Formula One victory, with Pironi, de Cesaris and Daly classified second, third and sixth respectively.

BBC commentator and 1976 world champion James Hunt commented, "Well, we've got this ridiculous situation where we're all sitting by the start-finish line waiting for a winner to come past, and we don't seem to be getting one!"

1982 San Marino Grand Prix

The 1982 San Marino Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 25 April 1982 at the Autodromo Dino Ferrari, Imola, Italy. It was the fourth race of the 1982 Formula One World Championship.

The race was boycotted by many teams as part of a political war, unrelated to the event itself, involving the two dominant forces within Formula One, the Fédération Internationale du Sport Automobile (FISA) and the Formula One Constructors' Association (FOCA). Only seven teams took part, giving a field of 14 cars.

The 60-lap race was won by Frenchman Didier Pironi, driving a Ferrari, with Canadian teammate Gilles Villeneuve second and Italian Michele Alboreto third in a Tyrrell-Ford. After the Renaults of René Arnoux and Alain Prost retired, Villeneuve led from Pironi before the Ferrari team ordered both drivers to slow down, with Alboreto far behind. Villeneuve interpreted this as an order to maintain position on the track; Pironi did not and thus overtook Villeneuve on the final lap, infuriating the Canadian to the point that he vowed never to speak to Pironi again. Villeneuve would lose his life in a crash during qualifying for the Belgian Grand Prix two weeks later.

1983 Austrian Grand Prix

The 1983 Austrian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at the Österreichring on 14 August 1983. It was the eleventh race of the 1983 FIA Formula One World Championship.

The 53-lap race was won by Alain Prost, driving a factory Renault, with Drivers' Championship rivals René Arnoux and Nelson Piquet second and third in a Ferrari and a Brabham-BMW respectively. With the win, Prost extended his lead in the Drivers' Championship to 14 points with four races remaining. However, this would turn out to be the final victory for the original factory Renault team.

1983 Canadian Grand Prix

The 1983 Canadian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Circuit Gilles Villeneuve on 12 June 1983. The race, contested over 70 laps, was the eighth race of the 1983 FIA Formula One World Championship and was won from pole position by René Arnoux, driving a Ferrari. Eddie Cheever finished second in a Renault, with Arnoux's teammate Patrick Tambay third.

1983 Dutch Grand Prix

The 1983 Dutch Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Zandvoort on 28 August 1983. It was the twelfth race of the 1983 FIA Formula One World Championship.

The 72-lap race was won by René Arnoux, driving a Ferrari, with team-mate Patrick Tambay second and John Watson third in a McLaren-Ford. Alain Prost and Nelson Piquet collided midway through the race while challenging for the lead, allowing Arnoux to move into second in the Drivers' Championship, eight points behind Prost. However, this would turn out to be Arnoux's last Formula One victory.

Derek Warwick finished fourth to score his and the Toleman team's first points. Mauro Baldi in the Alfa Romeo and Michele Alboreto in the Tyrrell completed the top six.

The race saw McLaren debut the new Porsche-built TAG turbo engine. Niki Lauda drove the TAG-powered MP4/1E car, while Watson continued with the Ford-powered MP4/1C. However, Lauda could only qualify 19th, four places behind Watson, and retired on lap 26 with a brake failure. Watson's third place was the last time a car with a naturally aspirated engine would legally finish on a Formula One podium until the 1988 Canadian Grand Prix.

1983 German Grand Prix

The 1983 German Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Hockenheimring on 7 August 1983. The race, contested over 45 laps, was the tenth race of the 1983 Formula One season and was won by René Arnoux, driving a Ferrari, with Andrea de Cesaris second in an Alfa Romeo and Riccardo Patrese third in a Brabham-BMW. The win, Arnoux's second in three races, moved him into contention for the Drivers' Championship, with leader Alain Prost only managing fourth in his Renault.

Niki Lauda was disqualified from fifth for reversing his McLaren-Ford in the pits.

1983 Italian Grand Prix

The 1983 Italian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Monza on 11 September 1983. It was the thirteenth race of the 1983 Formula One World Championship.

The 52-lap race was won by Nelson Piquet, driving a Brabham-BMW, with René Arnoux second in a Ferrari and Eddie Cheever third in a Renault. Drivers' Championship leader Alain Prost retired with a turbo failure midway through the race, allowing Piquet and Arnoux to close to within five and two points of him respectively in the championship.

The race saw the occurrence of an unusual incident in the pit lane. After completing a pit stop, Niki Lauda's McLaren-TAG stalled in front of the Brabham garage. The Brabham crew, who were preparing for Piquet's stop, were joined by team owner and FOCA chief executive Bernie Ecclestone in giving Lauda a push start, to get him back into the race and to clear the area for Piquet. However, the Austrian driver retired shortly after with an electrical failure.

Another incident occurred at the end of the race, when the tifosi ran onto the track to celebrate Arnoux's second place with the cars still going round. Nigel Mansell, running seventh in his Lotus-Renault, slowed down to avoid running over any of the spectators, only to be overtaken by Bruno Giacomelli's Toleman-Hart. Infuriated, Mansell drove the wrong way into the pit lane.

1983 San Marino Grand Prix

The 1983 San Marino Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Imola on 1 May 1983. It was the fourth race of the 1983 FIA Formula One World Championship.

Frenchman Patrick Tambay took a popular victory in his Ferrari in front of a delighted Tifosi. Driving the #27 car, Tambay dedicated his win to the man he had replaced in the Ferrari team, the late Gilles Villeneuve. It was almost a perfect weekend for the Maranello-based team with René Arnoux qualifying on pole and finishing third. Renault's Alain Prost finished in second place, passing Arnoux with three laps left after the #28 Ferrari spun at the Acque Minerali chicane.

Brabham driver Riccardo Patrese had taken the lead from Tambay with six laps remaining, but only held the lead for half a lap before crashing at Acque Minerali. Showing their love for Ferrari more than for an Italian driver in a non-Italian car, the Tifosi cheered as Patrese handed the lead back to Tambay.

This would be the last time that Ferrari founder Enzo Ferrari saw his Formula One team score a victory in person. Enzo never attended races outside Italy at the time, and Ferrari would not win on Italian soil again until after Enzo died in 1988.

1984 Belgian Grand Prix

The 1984 Belgian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 29 April 1984. It was race 3 of 16 in the 1984 FIA Formula One World Championship. It was the 42nd Belgian Grand Prix, and the tenth and last to be held at Circuit Zolder. The race was held over 70 laps of the 4.26-kilometre (2.65 mi) circuit for a race distance of 298.3 kilometres (185.4 mi).

The race was won by Italian driver Michele Alboreto driving a Ferrari 126C4. It was Alboreto's third Grand Prix victory and his first since joining Scuderia Ferrari for the 1984 season and became the first Italian to win for the Prancing Horse since Ludovico Scarfiotti won the 1966 Italian Grand Prix. Alboreto took a 42-second victory over British driver Derek Warwick driving a Renault RE50. It was Warwick's best ever Grand Prix result, improving on the third place he had achieved at the previous race in South Africa. Alboreto's French teammate René Arnoux was third.

With Alain Prost failing to finish, his lead in the world championship tightened to five points with Warwick moving into second place ahead of Niki Lauda.

1984 San Marino Grand Prix

The 1984 San Marino Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Imola on 6 May 1984. It was race 4 of 16 in the 1984 FIA Formula One World Championship.

The 60-lap race was won by Alain Prost, driving a McLaren-TAG. René Arnoux finished second in a Ferrari, while Elio de Angelis was third in a Lotus-Renault, despite running out of fuel on the last lap.

A dispute between the Toleman team and tyre suppliers Pirelli resulted in Ayrton Senna failing to qualify, the only time this would happen in the Brazilian's F1 career.

1985 Brazilian Grand Prix

The 1985 Brazilian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Jacarepaguá on April 7, 1985. It was the first round of the 1985 FIA Formula One World Championship.

Of note, even though René Arnoux finished 4th for Ferrari, he was sacked after the race, with both the team and Arnoux never revealing the reason behind the sacking. The driver who finished 7th in this race, Stefan Johansson, was picked up by the Scuderia for the rest of the year. This race was also Nigel Mansell's first race of seven seasons with the Williams team.

Automobiles Martini

Automobiles Martini is a constructor of Formula racing cars from France, founded by Renato "Tico" Martini in 1965, when Martini and partner Bill Knight founded the Winfield Racing School at the Magny-Cours circuit, in France. Martini's first car was the MW3, a Formula Three car built in 1968.

Although better known for their successful efforts in Formula Three, Formula Renault and other lower formulae during the 1970s and 1980s, they are also known for having taken part in nine rounds of the 1978 Formula One season with the single MK23 chassis, giving René Arnoux (later a driver for Renault and Ferrari) his debut in Formula One. Future four time World Drivers' Champion Alain Prost also used a Renault powered Martini to win the 1978 and 1979 French Formula Three Championship while driving for French team Oreca.

With Reynard, Ralt and Dallara crowding out the F3 market in the late 1980s, Martini reduced their customer program, keeping a stubborn presence in the French F3 championship during the 1990s, until Tico Martini finally sold the team to Guy Ligier in 2004.

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