Reims

Reims (/riːmz/; also spelled Rheims; French: [ʁɛ̃s]), a city in the Grand Est region of France, lies 129 km (80 mi) east-northeast of Paris. The 2013 census recorded 182,592 inhabitants (Rémoises (feminine) and Rémois (masculine)) in the city of Reims proper (the commune), and 317,611 inhabitants in the metropolitan area (aire urbaine). Its primary river, the Vesle, is a tributary of the Aisne.

Founded by the Gauls, it became a major city during the period of the Roman Empire.[1] Reims played a prominent ceremonial role in French monarchical history as the traditional site of the crowning of the kings of France. The Cathedral of Reims (damaged during the First World War but restored since) housed the Holy Ampulla (Sainte Ampoule) containing the Saint Chrême (chrism), allegedly brought by a white dove (the Holy Spirit) at the baptism of Clovis in 496. It was used for the anointing, the most important part of the coronation of French kings.

Reims
City hall (hôtel de ville)
City hall (hôtel de ville)
Flag of Reims

Flag
Coat of arms of Reims

Coat of arms
Location of Reims
Reims is located in France
Reims
Reims
Reims is located in Grand Est
Reims
Reims
Coordinates: 49°15′46″N 4°02′05″E / 49.2628°N 4.0347°ECoordinates: 49°15′46″N 4°02′05″E / 49.2628°N 4.0347°E
CountryFrance
RegionGrand Est
DepartmentMarne
ArrondissementReims
CantonReims-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9
IntercommunalityCU Grand Reims
Government
 • Mayor (2014–2019) Arnaud Robinet (LR)
Area
1
46.9 km2 (18.1 sq mi)
Population
(2016)2
183,113
 • Density3,900/km2 (10,000/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+02:00 (CEST)
INSEE/Postal code
51454 /51100
Elevation80–135 m (262–443 ft)
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.

Administration

Reims functions as a subprefecture of the department of Marne,[2] in the administrative region of Grand Est. Although Reims is by far the largest commune in its department, Châlons-en-Champagne is the prefecture.

History

St Remy Bishop of Rheims begging of Clovis the restitution of the Sacred Vase taken by the Franks in the Pillage of Soissons
Saint Remigius, Bishop of Reims, begging of Clovis the restitution of the Sacred Vase taken by the Franks in the pillage of Soissons. — Costumes of the court of Burgundy in the 15th century. — Facsimile of a miniature in a manuscript of the History of the Emperors (Library of the Arsenal).
Aviatiker-Woche Reims 1909
A month after Blériot's crossing of the English Channel in a biplane, the aviation week in Reims (August 1909) caught special attention.

Before the Roman conquest of northern Gaul, Reims, founded circa 80 BC as *Durocorteron ("round fortress"; in Latin: Durocortōrum), served as the capital of the tribe of the Remi — whose name the town would subsequently echo. In the course of Julius Caesar's conquest of Gaul (58–51 BC), the Remi allied themselves with the Romans, and by their fidelity throughout the various Gallic insurrections secured the special favour of the imperial power.[2] At its height in Roman times the city had a population in the range of 30,000 - 50,000 or perhaps up to 100,000.[3]

Christianity had become established in the city by 260, at which period Saint Sixtus of Reims founded the bishopric of Reims. The consul Jovinus, an influential supporter of the new faith, repelled the Alamanni who invaded Champagne in 336; but the Vandals captured the city in 406 and slew Bishop Nicasius;[2] and in 451 Attila the Hun put Reims to fire and sword.

In 496 – ten years after Clovis, King of the Salian Franks, won his victory at Soissons (486) — Remigius, the bishop of Reims, baptized him using the oil of the sacred phial – purportedly brought from heaven by a dove for the baptism of Clovis and subsequently preserved in the Abbey of Saint-Remi.[2] For centuries the events at the crowning of Clovis I became a symbol used by the monarchy to claim the divine right to rule.

Meetings of Pope Stephen II (752–757) with Pepin the Short, and of Pope Leo III (795–816) with Charlemagne (died 814), took place at Reims; and here Pope Stephen IV crowned Louis the Debonnaire in 816. King Louis IV gave the city and countship of Reims to the archbishop Artaldus in 940. King Louis VII (reigned 1137–1180) gave the title of duke and peer to William of Champagne, archbishop from 1176 to 1202, and the archbishops of Reims took precedence over the other ecclesiastical peers of the realm.[2]

By the 10th century Reims had become a centre of intellectual culture. Archbishop Adalberon (in office 969 to 988), seconded by the monk Gerbert (afterwards (from 999 to 1003) Pope Silvester II), founded schools which taught the classical "liberal arts". (Adalberon also played a leading role in the dynastic revolution which elevated the Capetian dynasty in the place of the Carolingians.)[2]

The archbishops held the important prerogative of the consecration of the kings of France – a privilege which they exercised (except in a few cases) from the time of Philippe II Augustus (anointed 1179, reigned 1180–1223) to that of Charles X (anointed 1825). Louis VII granted the city a communal charter in 1139. The Treaty of Troyes (1420) ceded it to the English, who had made a futile attempt to take it by siege in 1360; but French patriots expelled them on the approach of Joan of Arc, who in 1429 had Charles VII consecrated in the cathedral. Louis XI cruelly suppressed a revolt at Reims, caused in 1461 by the salt tax. During the French Wars of Religion the city sided with the Catholic League (1585), but submitted to King Henri IV after the battle of Ivry (1590).[2]

In the invasions of the War of the Sixth Coalition in 1814, anti-Napoleonic allied armies captured and re-captured Reims; in 1870–1871, during the Franco-Prussian War, the victorious Germans made it the seat of a governor-general and impoverished it with heavy requisitions.[2]

In August 1909 Reims hosted the first international aviation meet, the Grande Semaine d'Aviation de la Champagne. Major aviation personages such as Glenn Curtiss, Louis Blériot and Louis Paulhan participated.

Hostilities in World War I greatly damaged the city. German bombardment and a subsequent fire in 1914 did severe damage to the cathedral. The ruined cathedral became one of the central images of anti-German propaganda produced in France during the war, which presented it, along with the ruins of the Cloth Hall at Ypres and the University Library in Louvain, as evidence that German aggression targeted cultural landmarks of European civilization.

(Top) - German officers sign unconditional surrender in Reims, France. (Bottom) - Allied force leaders at the signing. - NARA - 195337
German surrender of 7 May 1945 in Reims.
(Top) – German officers sign unconditional surrender in Reims.
(Bottom) – Allied force leaders at the signing.

From the end of World War I to the present day an international effort to restore the cathedral from the ruins has continued. The Palace of Tau, St Jacques Church and the Abbey of St Remi also were protected and restored. The collection of preserved buildings and Roman ruins remains monumentally impressive.

St. Jacques, Rheims, France, 1907. (2788175622)
Interior of St Jacques, 1907.

During World War II the city suffered additional damage. But in Reims, at 2:41 on the morning of 7 May 1945, General Eisenhower and the Allies received the unconditional surrender of the German Wehrmacht. General Alfred Jodl, German Chief-of-Staff, signed the surrender at the Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force (SHAEF) as the representative for German President Karl Dönitz.

The British statesman Leslie Hore-Belisha died of a cerebral haemorrhage while making a speech at the Reims hôtel de ville (city hall) in February 1957.

Sights

Streets and squares

Reims Place Erlon
Place Drouet d'Erlon in Reims

The principal squares of Reims include the Place Royale, with a statue of Louis XV, and the Place Cardinal-Luçon, with an equestrian statue of Joan of Arc. The Rue de Vesle, the main commercial street (continued under other names), traverses the city from southwest to northeast, passing through the Place Royale.[2] Restaurants and bars are concentrated around Place Drouet d'Erlon in the city centre.

Gallo-Roman antiquities

The oldest monument in Reims, the Porte de Mars ("Mars Gate", so called from a temple to Mars in the neighbourhood), a triumphal arch 108 feet in length by 43 in height, consists of three archways flanked by columns. Popular tradition tells that the Remi erected it in honour of Augustus when Agrippa made the great roads terminating at the city, but it probably belongs to the 3rd or 4th century. The Mars Gate was one of 4 Roman gates to the city walls, which were restored at the time of the Norman Invasion of northern France in the 9th century. In its vicinity a curious mosaic, measuring 36 feet by 26, with thirty-five medallions representing animals and gladiators, was discovered in 1860.[2]

Note too the Gallo-Roman sarcophagus, allegedly that of the 4th-century consul Jovinus, preserved in the archaeological museum in the cloister of the abbey of Saint-Remi.[2]

Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Reims

ND Reims interior
Interior of Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Reims

Many people know Reims for its cathedral, Notre-Dame de Reims, formerly the place of coronation of the kings of France. The cathedral became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1991, along with the former Abbey of Saint-Remi and the Palace of Tau.

Palace of Tau

The archiepiscopal palace, built between 1498 and 1509, and in part rebuilt in 1675, served as the residence of the kings of France on the occasion of their coronations. The salon (salle du Tau), where the royal banquet took place, has an immense stone chimney that dates from the 15th century. The chapel of the archiepiscopal palace consists of two storeys, of which the upper still (as of 2009) serves as a place of worship. Both the chapel and the salle du Tau have decorative tapestries of the 17th century, known as the Perpersack tapestries, after the Flemish weaver who executed them.[2] The palace opened to the public in 1972 as a museum containing such exhibits as statues formerly displayed by the cathedral, treasures of the cathedral from past centuries, and royal attire from coronations of French kings.

Saint Remi Basilica

Reims Basilique St Remi 01
Façade of Basilica St. Remi

Saint Remi Basilica, about a mile from the Cathedral of Notre Dame of Reims, takes its name from the fifth-century Saint Remi, revered as the patron saint of the inhabitants of Reims for more than fifteen centuries. The basilica approaches the cathedral in size. Adjacent to the basilica stands an important abbey, formerly known as the Royal Abbey of St Remi. The abbey sought to trace its heritage back to St Remi, while the present abbey building dates back to the 17th and 18th centuries.

The Saint Remi Basilica dates from the 11th, 12th, 13th and 15th centuries. Most of the construction of the church finished in the 11th century, with additions made later. The nave and transepts, Gothic in style, date mainly from the earliest, the façade of the south transept from the latest of those periods, the choir and apse chapels from the 12th and 13th centuries.[2] The 17th and 19th centuries saw further additions. The building suffered greatly in World War I, and the meticulous restoration work of architect Henri Deneux rebuilt it from its ruins over the following 40 years. As of 2009 it remains the seat of an active Catholic parish holding regular worship services and welcoming pilgrims. It has been classified as an historical monument since 1841 and is one of the pinnacles of the history of art and of the history of France.

Several royal and archepiscopal figures lie buried in the basilica, but in unidentified graves. They include:

Reims Basilique St Remi 07
Inside of Basilica St. Remi

The public can visit the abbey building, now the Saint-Remi Museum. The abbey closed in the wake of the French Revolution (the government had all French monasteries dissolved in February 1790). The museum exhibits include tapestries from the 16th century donated by the archbishop Robert de Lenoncourt (uncle of the cardinal of the same name), marble capitals from the fourth century AD, furniture, jewellery, pottery, weapons and glasswork from the sixth to eighth centuries, medieval sculpture, the façade of the 13th-century musicians' House, remnants from an earlier abbey building, and also exhibits of Gallo-Roman arts and crafts and a room of pottery, jewellery and weapons from Gallic civilization, as well as an exhibit of items from the Palaeolithic to the Neolithic periods.

Another section of the museum features a permanent military exhibition.

Forts

In 1874 the construction of a chain of detached forts started in the vicinity, the French Army having selected Reims as one of the chief defences of the northern approaches to Paris. Atop the ridge of St Thierry stands a fort of the same name, which with the neighbouring work of Chenay closes the west side of the place. To the north the hill of Brimont has three works guarding the Laon railway and the Aisne canal. Farther east, on the old Roman road, stands the Fort de Fresnes. Due east, the hills of Arnay are crowned with five large and important works which cover the approaches from the upper Aisne. Fort de la Pompelle, which hosts a World War I museum featuring a rich collection of German uniforms, and Montbré close the southeast side, and the Falaise hills on the southwest are open and unguarded. The perimeter of the defences measures just under 22 miles, and the forts are at a mean distance of 6 miles (10 km) from the centre of the city.[2]

Monument to the Black Army of Reims

The original monument was erected in 1924 where the Boulevard Henry Vasnier meets the Avenue du Général Giraud. The first stone was placed by André Maginot, Minister of War on 29 October 1922. This ceremony was also addressed by Blaise Diagne, the Senegalese political leader. In July 1924 the monument was inaugurated with a Military and Sports fete presided over by Édouard Daladier, the Minister of the colonies. General Louis Archinard was the president of the committee that supervised the erection of the monument, highlighting the role of African troops of the 1st Colonial Infantry Corps in the defense of Reims from the German Army in 1918. They were particularly renowned for their tenacious defence of Fort de la Pompelle. 10,000 people attended the fete which was held immediately following the inauguration. The original monument, consisting of five figures, was a replica of a similar monument erected in Bamako, Mali in January 1924. The monument was dismantled during the German occupation in September 1940. In September 1958, on the occasion of the fortieth anniversary of the Defence of Reims, a new monument was started. This was completed in time for a second inauguration ceremony on 6 October 1963, with Pierre Messmer, Minister of Armies, Jean Sainteny, Minister of veterans, Jacques Foccart, secretary general of the Communauté et les affaires africaines et malgaches, and General Georges Catroux, grand chancellor of the Légion d'honneur. In 2008, on the occasion of the ninetieth anniversary of the defence of Reims, a major ceremony was held in remembrance of the Black Army of Reims, attended by Jean-Marie Bockel, Rama Yade and Adeline Hazan.[4]

Other buildings

Paris door, Reims, France 2004-11-06
Paris door, Reims
France, Reims and its cathedral, 1916
Reims in 1916

The Church of St Jacques dates from the 13th to the 16th centuries. A few blocks from the cathedral, it stands as of 2009 in a neighborhood of shopping and restaurants. What remains of the Abbey of St. Denis has become a Fine Arts Museum. The old College of the Jesuits also survives as a museum. The churches of St Maurice (partly rebuilt in 1867), St André,[2] and St Thomas (erected from 1847 to 1853, under the patronage of Cardinal Gousset, now buried within its walls[2]) also draw tourists.

The Temple protestant de Reims was designed by Charles Letrosne in a flamboyant neo-Gothic style. Originally the walls were lavishly decorated in Art Deco style by Gustave Louis Jaulmes, but in 1973 the walls were painted white, giving an austere appearance.[5]

The Foujita Chapel (1966), designed and decorated by the Japanese School of Paris artist Tsuguharu Foujita, became famed for its frescos. It was listed as an historic monument in 1992.[6]

The city hall (hôtel de ville), erected in the 17th century and enlarged in the 19th, features a pediment with an equestrian statue of Louis XIII (reigned 1610 to 1643).[2]

The Surrender Museum is the building in which on 7 May 1945, General Eisenhower and the Allies received the unconditional surrender of the German Wehrmacht.

The Carnegie library, the former public library built with money donated by Andrew Carnegie to the city of Reims after World War I, is a remarkable example of Art Deco in France.

Transport

Reims is served by two main railway stations: Gare de Reims in the city centre, the hub for regional transport, and the new Gare de Champagne-Ardenne TGV 5 kilometres (3 miles) southwest of the city with high-speed rail connections to Paris, Metz, Nancy and Strasbourg. The motorways A4 (Paris-Strasbourg), A26 (Calais-Langres) and A34 intersect near Reims.

Public transport within the city consists of buses and a tramway, the latter opened in 2011.

Wine

Reims, along with Épernay and Ay, functions as one of the centres of champagne production. Many of the largest champagne-producing houses, known as les grandes marques, have their headquarters in Reims, and most open for tasting and tours. Champagne ages in the many caves and tunnels under Reims, which form a sort of maze below the city. Carved from chalk, some of these passages date back to Roman times.

Sport

Between 1925 and 1969 Reims hosted the Grand Prix de la Marne automobile race at the circuit of Reims-Gueux. The French Grand Prix took place here 14 times between 1938 and 1966.

As of 2016 the football club Stade Reims, based in the city, competed in the Ligue 1, the first-highest tier of French football. Stade Reims became the outstanding team of France in the 1950s and early 1960s and reached the final of the European Cup of Champions twice in that era.

In October 2018, the city hosted the second Teqball World Cup.

The city has hosted the Reims Marathon since 1984.

Notable residents

Those born in Reims include:

Higher education

The URCA (University of Reims Champagne-Ardenne|Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne) was created in 1548. This multidisciplinary university develops innovative, fundamental and applied research. It provides more than 18 000 students in Reims (22 000 in Champagne-Ardenne) with a wide initial undergraduate studies program which corresponds to society's needs in all domains of the knowledge. The university also accompanies independent or company backed students in continuing professional development training. The Institut d'Etudes politiques de Paris, the leading French university in social and political sciences, also known as Sciences Po, opened a new campus in the Collège des Jésuites de Reims in 2010. It hosts both the Europe-Africa and Europe-America Program[9] with more than 1500 students in the respective programs. In 2012 the first Reims Model United Nations was launched, which gathered 200 international students from all the Sciences Po campuses. Daniel Rondeau, the ambassador of France to UNESCO and a French writer, is the patron of the event. NEOMA Business School (former Reims Management School) is also one of the main schools in Reims.

International relations

Twin towns – sister cities

Reims is twinned with:

See also

References

  1. ^ "Reims," entry in Nouveau petit Larousse, 1971, p. 1638.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q  One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Reims" . Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
  3. ^ de Planhol, X.; Claval, P. (1994). An Historical Geography of France. Cambridge University Press. p. 47. ISBN 9780521322089. Retrieved 10 October 2014.
  4. ^ "Le monument à l'Armée noire de Reims" (in French). Archived from the original on 24 July 2012. Retrieved 11 November 2010.
  5. ^ Guttinger, Philippe (2015). "Le temple protestant de Reims". Retrieved 4 July 2015.
  6. ^ "French Culture Ministry: listing of the Foujita chapel". culture.gouv.fr. Retrieved 16 August 2015.
  7. ^ "Normes et records 1961-1990: Reims-Champagne (51) - altitude 91m" (in French). Infoclimat. Retrieved 31 December 2015.
  8. ^ Oxford Music Online
  9. ^ "Welcome | Sciences Po - College Universitaire de Reims - Campus Euro-Américain". college.sciences-po.fr. Retrieved 10 October 2014.
  10. ^ "British towns twinned with French towns [via WaybackMachine.com]". Archant Community Media Ltd. Archived from the original on 5 July 2013. Retrieved 20 July 2013.
  11. ^ Canterbury City Council – Twinning contacts. Retrieved on 14 October 2009. Canterbury.gov.uk (1 March 2011). Retrieved on 25 August 2011.
  12. ^ Calderdale Council (2013). "Aachen: Twin towns: Calderdale Council". calderdale.gov.uk. Archived from the original on 28 September 2013. Retrieved 2 January 2013.
  13. ^ en-db (2013). "Aachen, Aachen, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany – City, Town and Village of the world". en.db-city.com. Retrieved 3 January 2013.

External links

1956 European Cup Final

The 1956 European Cup Final was the first ever final in the pan-European football competition, the European Cup, now known as the UEFA Champions League. It was contested by Real Madrid of Spain and Reims from France. It was played at the Parc des Princes in Paris on 13 June 1956 in front of 38,000 people. Real Madrid reached the final by beating the now seven times champions Milan 5–4 on aggregate, whereas Reims beat Scottish club Hibernian 3–0 on aggregate. The match finished 4–3 to Real Madrid, who went on to record an unrivalled five consecutive European Cup titles. The match started brightly for Reims, with Michel Leblond and Jean Templin scoring to make it 2–0 inside ten minutes, but by half time Madrid had levelled the scores, through goals from Alfredo Di Stéfano and Héctor Rial. Reims took the lead again on 62 minutes through Michel Hidalgo, but Marquitos and Rial scored in the 67th and 79th minutes respectively to win the cup for Madrid.

1959 European Cup Final

The 1959 European Cup Final was the fourth final in the pan-European football competition, the European Cup, now known as the UEFA Champions League. It was contested by Real Madrid of Spain and Reims from France. It was played at the Neckarstadion in Stuttgart on 3 June 1959 in front of 80,000 people. The match finished 2–0 to Real Madrid, winning their fourth European Cup in a row and beating Reims in final for the second time in four years, following the 1956 final. Madrid dominated the match with goals by Enrique Mateos and Alfredo Di Stéfano.

Battle of Reims (1814)

The Battle of Reims (12–13 March 1814) was fought at Reims, France between an Imperial French army commanded by Emperor Napoleon and a combined Russian-Prussian corps led by General Emmanuel de Saint-Priest. On the first day, Saint-Priest's Russians and General Friedrich Wilhelm von Jagow's Prussians easily captured Reims from its French National Guard garrison, capturing or killing more than half of its defenders. On the second day, an overconfident Saint-Priest carelessly deployed his forces west of the city, not grasping that Napoleon was approaching with 20,000 troops. Too late, Saint-Priest realized who he was fighting and tried to organize a retreat. In the battle that followed, the French army struck with crushing force and the Allies were routed with serious losses. During the fighting, Saint-Priest was struck by a howitzer shell and died two weeks later.

Biscuit rose de Reims

Biscuit rose de Reims (French: biscuits roses de Reims), is a pink biscuit found in French cuisine, made pink by the addition of carmine.

Cernay-lès-Reims

Cernay-lès-Reims is a commune in the Marne department in north-eastern France.

Cernay-lès-Reims, along with the neighboring commune of Berru, is notable in the literature of paleontology as the site of a geologic formation (part of the Paris Basin) that has yielded a significant number of Paleocene-strata fossils.

Cessna 150

The Cessna 150 is a two-seat tricycle gear general aviation airplane that was designed for flight training, touring and personal use.The Cessna 150 is the fifth most produced civilian plane ever, with 23,839 aircraft produced. The Cessna 150 was offered for sale in the 150 basic model, Commuter, Commuter II, Patroller and the aerobatic Aerobat models.

Cessna 172

The Cessna 172 Skyhawk is an American four-seat, single-engine, high wing, fixed-wing aircraft made by the Cessna Aircraft Company. First flown in 1955, more 172s have been built than any other aircraft.Measured by its longevity and popularity, the Cessna 172 is the most successful aircraft in history. Cessna delivered the first production model in 1956 and as of 2015, the company and its partners had built more than 44,000. The aircraft remains in production today.

The Skyhawk's main competitors have been the Beechcraft Musketeer and Grumman AA-5 series (neither currently in production), the Piper Cherokee, and, more recently, the Diamond DA40 and Cirrus SR20.

Cessna Skymaster

The Cessna Skymaster is a United States twin-engine civil utility aircraft built in a push-pull configuration. Its engines are mounted in the nose and rear of its pod-style fuselage. Twin booms extend aft of the wings to the vertical stabilizers, with the rear engine between them. The horizontal stabilizer is aft of the pusher propeller, mounted between and connecting the two booms. The combined tractor and pusher engines produce centerline thrust and a unique sound. The Cessna O-2 Skymaster is a military version of the Cessna 337 Super Skymaster.

Jouy-lès-Reims

Jouy-lès-Reims is a commune in the Marne department of north-eastern France.

Pargny-lès-Reims

Pargny-lès-Reims is a commune in the Marne department in north-eastern France.

Reims-Gueux

The circuit Reims-Gueux was a Grand Prix motor racing road course, located in Gueux, 7.5 km west of Reims in the Champagne region of north-eastern France, established in 1926 as the second venue of the Grand Prix de la Marne. The triangular layout of public roads formed three sectors between the villages of Thillois and Gueux over the La Garenne / Gueux intersection of Route nationale 31. The circuit became known to be among the fastest of the era for its two long straights (approximately 2.2 km in length each) allowing maximum straight-line speed, resulting in many famous slipstream battles.

Reims-la-Brûlée

Reims-la-Brûlée is a commune in the Marne department in north-eastern France.

Reims Cathedral

Reims Cathedral, sometimes known as Our Lady of Reims (French: Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Reims), is a Roman Catholic cathedral in Reims, France, built in the High Gothic style. The cathedral replaced an older church, destroyed by fire in 1211, that was built on the site of the basilica where Clovis I was baptized by Saint Remi, bishop of Reims in 496. That original structure had itself been erected on the site of some Roman baths.

The seat of the Archdiocese of Reims, the cathedral was where the kings of France were crowned.The cathedral, a major tourist destination, receives about one million visitors annually.

Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Reims

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Reims (Latin: Archidioecesis Remensis; French: Archidiocèse de Reims) is an archdiocese of the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic Church in France. Erected as a diocese around 250 by St. Sixtus, the diocese was elevated to an archdiocese around 750. The archbishop received the title "primate of Gallia Belgica" in 1089.

In 1023, Archbishop Ebles acquired the Countship of Reims, making him a prince-bishop; it became a duchy and a peerage between 1060 and 1170.

The archdiocese comprises the arrondissement of Reims and the département of Ardennes while the province comprises the région of Champagne-Ardenne. The suffragan dioceses in the ecclesiastical province of Reims are Amiens; Beauvais, Noyon, and Senlis; Châlons; Langres; Soissons, Laon, and Saint-Quentin; and Troyes. The archepiscopal see is located in the cathedral of Notre-Dame de Reims, where the Kings of France were traditionally crowned. In 2014 it was estimated that there was one priest for every 4,760 Catholics in the diocese.

Pope Francis appointed Éric de Moulins-Beaufort Archbishop of Reims in 2018.

Saint Remigius

Saint Remigius, Remy or Remi, (French: Saint Rémi or Saint Rémy; Italian: Remigio; Spanish: Remigio; Occitan: Romieg; Polish: Remigiusz; Breton: Remig and Lithuanian: Remigijus), was Bishop of Reims and Apostle of the Franks, (c. 437 – January 13, AD 533). On 25 December 496 he baptised Clovis I, King of the Franks. This baptism, leading to the conversion of the entire Frankish people to Christianity, was a momentous success for the Church and a seminal event in European history.

Second Battle of the Marne

The Second Battle of the Marne (French: Seconde Bataille de la Marne) (15 July – 6 August 1918) was the last major German offensive on the Western Front during the First World War. The attack failed when an Allied counterattack, supported by several hundred tanks, overwhelmed the Germans on their right flank, inflicting severe casualties. The German defeat marked the start of the relentless Allied advance which culminated in the Armistice with Germany about 100 days later.

Stade de Reims

Stade de Reims ([stɑd də ʁɛ̃s]; commonly referred to as Stade Reims or simply Reims) is a French association football club based in Reims. The club was formed in 1910 under the name Société Sportive du Parc Pommery and currently plays in Ligue 1, the top level of French football, having been promoted from Ligue 2 in the previous season. Reims plays its home matches at the Stade Auguste Delaune, a renovation of the old complex located within the city. The team is managed by David Guion.

Reims is one of the most successful clubs in French football history having won six Ligue 1 titles, two Coupe de France trophies, and five Trophée des champions titles. The club has also performed well on European level having finished as runners-up in the 1956 and 1959 editions of the European Cup and winning the Latin Cup and Coppa delle Alpi in 1953 and 1977, respectively. However, since the 1980s, Reims have struggled to get back to their zenith. The club hovered between Ligue 2 and the Championnat National for over thirty years after their relegation from the top flight in the 1978–79 season. In 2012 they were promoted back to Ligue 1, eventually being relegated again in 2016.

Historically, Reims is viewed as a legendary club within French football circles, not only due to its domestic and European accolades, but its charity towards the France national team through the 1940s and 1950s, as well. Reims were largely responsible for the first Golden Generation of French football with notable national team members Roger Marche, Raymond Kopa, Just Fontaine, Jean Vincent, Robert Jonquet, Armand Penverne, Dominique Colonna, and Roger Piantoni all playing for Reims during the national team's successful run to the semi-finals at the 1958 FIFA World Cup.

University of Reims Champagne-Ardenne

The University of Reims Champagne-Ardenne (also University of Reims; French: Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, URCA) is a French university, in the Academy of Reims. It was officially established in 1967, as the successor of Rheims University, which was established in 1548 and closed in 1793.

Witry-lès-Reims

Witry-lès-Reims is a commune in the Marne department in north-eastern France.

Climate data for Reims (1961–1990)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 16.6
(61.9)
21.6
(70.9)
24.0
(75.2)
29.4
(84.9)
31.7
(89.1)
35.4
(95.7)
37.7
(99.9)
37.3
(99.1)
33.0
(91.4)
27.5
(81.5)
20.0
(68.0)
16.7
(62.1)
37.7
(99.9)
Average high °C (°F) 4.9
(40.8)
6.9
(44.4)
10.2
(50.4)
13.9
(57.0)
18.1
(64.6)
21.4
(70.5)
23.8
(74.8)
23.4
(74.1)
20.3
(68.5)
15.4
(59.7)
9.2
(48.6)
5.9
(42.6)
14.5
(58.1)
Daily mean °C (°F) 2.3
(36.1)
3.4
(38.1)
6.0
(42.8)
8.9
(48.0)
12.7
(54.9)
15.9
(60.6)
17.9
(64.2)
17.7
(63.9)
14.9
(58.8)
11.0
(51.8)
6.0
(42.8)
3.2
(37.8)
10.0
(50.0)
Average low °C (°F) −0.4
(31.3)
−0.1
(31.8)
1.8
(35.2)
3.8
(38.8)
7.3
(45.1)
10.4
(50.7)
12.0
(53.6)
11.9
(53.4)
9.5
(49.1)
6.6
(43.9)
2.8
(37.0)
0.5
(32.9)
5.5
(41.9)
Record low °C (°F) −22.3
(−8.1)
−19.9
(−3.8)
−10.8
(12.6)
−5.5
(22.1)
−2.1
(28.2)
−0.4
(31.3)
3.1
(37.6)
2.0
(35.6)
−0.7
(30.7)
−6.6
(20.1)
−11.5
(11.3)
−19.6
(−3.3)
−22.3
(−8.1)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 43.6
(1.72)
42.2
(1.66)
50.8
(2.00)
43.4
(1.71)
59.8
(2.35)
58.8
(2.31)
52.2
(2.06)
49.4
(1.94)
49.5
(1.95)
51.5
(2.03)
53.1
(2.09)
49.8
(1.96)
604.1
(23.78)
Average precipitation days (≥ 1.0 mm) 10.7 9.2 10.9 9.8 9.9 9.3 7.8 7.9 8.2 8.9 10.3 10.3 113.2
Average snowy days 5.6 4.9 3.4 1.4 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.0 3.9 21.3
Average relative humidity (%) 88 84 80 77 78 78 76 77 81 86 88 88 81.8
Mean monthly sunshine hours 50.3 86.1 129.4 171.7 206.9 220.0 235.0 216.3 170.6 121.6 71.9 49.0 1,728.8
Source: Infoclimat.fr[7]
Communes of the department of Marne

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