Redbox Bowl

The Redbox Bowl is a post-season college football bowl game certified by the NCAA that has been played annually since 2002. It was originally the San Francisco Bowl. It was the Emerald Bowl from 2004 to 2009, the Fight Hunger Bowl from 2010 to 2013, and the Foster Farms Bowl from 2014 to 2017.[2] It was renamed again, to the Redbox Bowl, in 2018.

From 2002 to 2013, the annual game was played at 40,800-seat AT&T Park, home of the San Francisco Giants, in San Francisco, California. Starting in 2014, it has been played at Levi's Stadium, home of the San Francisco 49ers, in Santa Clara, California.[3]

Redbox Bowl
Redbox Bowl logo
StadiumLevi's Stadium
LocationSanta Clara, California
Previous stadiumsAT&T Park (2002–2013)
Previous locationsSan Francisco, California (2002–2013)
Operated2002–present
Conference tie-insPac-12 (2006–present)
Big Ten (2014–present)
Previous conference tie-insBig East (2002–2004)
Mtn West (2002–2005)
ACC (2005–2010)
Army (2011)
Navy (2012)
BYU (2013)
PayoutUS$2,212,500 (as of 2015)[1]
Sponsors
Diamond Foods (2002–2009)
Kraft Foods (2010–2012)
Foster Farms (2014–2017)
Redbox (2018–present)
Former names
San Francisco Bowl (2002)
Diamond Walnut San Francisco Bowl (2002–2003)
Emerald Bowl (2004–2009)
Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl (2010–2012)
Fight Hunger Bowl (2013)
Foster Farms Bowl (2014–2017)
2017 matchup
Arizona vs. Purdue (Purdue 38–35)
2018 matchup
Michigan State vs. Oregon (Oregon 7–6)

History

The plans for the inaugural 2002 San Francisco Bowl were established on Dec. 2, 2002, when the Air Force Falcons football program accepted a bid to play against an undetermined team from the Big East Conference.[4] Their initial sponsor was Diamond Foods, a producer of walnuts and other nuts under the Emerald brand name, resulting in the name Diamond Walnut San Francisco Bowl, and later the Emerald Bowl.

In 2010, Kraft Foods became the sponsor of the bowl and announced the new name, which the corporation launched as part of a broader hunger relief program.[5] According to Sports Illustrated, the executive director of the bowl, Gary Cavalli, was paid a $377,475 salary in 2009.[6] Mondelēz International continued to support the game and the program related with Feeding America in 2013.

In August 2014, the bowl's official website listed the game's name as the San Francisco Bowl once again.[7] However, on November 11, 2014, it was announced that the San Francisco Bowl Game Association had reached a multi-year naming rights deal with Northern California-based poultry company Foster Farms, resulting in the game being named the Foster Farms Bowl.[8]

On July 12, 2016, the San Francisco 49ers NFL team announced that it had taken over management of the Foster Farms Bowl from the San Francisco Bowl Game Association, and also announced a new, four-year broadcast rights deal with Fox Sports, replacing ESPN.[9]

In September 2018, Redbox (a chain of video rental kiosks) announced it had become the new title sponsor.[10][11]

Field configuration

Because AT&T Park is a baseball park and not normally used for football, arrangement of the field required both teams to be on the same sideline (southeast), separated by a barrier at the 50-yard line (in shallow right-center field). The opposite sideline (northwest) ran along the third base line, with an end zone near the first base dugout, and the other near the left field wall. Primary seating was in the third base grandstand, with temporary bleacher seating in right-center field.

Matchups

The game had a contract to host the Pac-12's sixth-place team during the 2010 through 2013 seasons. There were multiple contracts that determined the opponent. In 2011, the Pac-12 team's opponent was Illinois, replacing Army, which did not achieve bowl eligibility; in 2012, it was Navy; and in 2013, it was BYU. Had these teams not qualified for bowl eligibility, they would have been replaced by teams from the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) or the Mid-American Conference (MAC).

Beginning with the 2014 season, teams come from the Pac-12 and Big Ten conferences.[12]

Results

Rankings are based on the AP Poll prior to the game being played.

Date Bowl name Winning team Losing team Attnd.
December 31, 2002 San Francisco Bowl No. 21 Virginia Tech 20  Air Force 13   25,966
December 31, 2003 San Francisco Bowl Boston College 35 Colorado State 21 25,621
December 30, 2004 Emerald Bowl Navy 34 New Mexico 19 30,563
December 29, 2005 Emerald Bowl Utah 38 No. 24 Georgia Tech 10 25,742
December 27, 2006 Emerald Bowl Florida State 44 UCLA 27 40,331
December 28, 2007 Emerald Bowl Oregon State 21 Maryland 14 32,517
December 27, 2008 Emerald Bowl California 24 Miami (FL) 17 42,268
December 26, 2009 Emerald Bowl USC 24 Boston College 13 40,121
January 9, 2011 Fight Hunger Bowl   No 13. Nevada 20 Boston College 13 41,063
December 31, 2011 Fight Hunger Bowl Illinois 20 UCLA 14 29,878
December 29, 2012 Fight Hunger Bowl Arizona State 62 Navy 28 34,172
December 27, 2013 Fight Hunger Bowl Washington 31 BYU 16 34,136
December 30, 2014 Foster Farms Bowl Stanford 45 Maryland 21 34,780
December 26, 2015 Foster Farms Bowl Nebraska 37 UCLA 29 33,527
December 28, 2016 Foster Farms Bowl Utah 26 Indiana 24 27,608
December 27, 2017 Foster Farms Bowl Purdue 38 Arizona 35 28,436
December 31, 2018 Redbox Bowl Oregon 7 Michigan State 6 30,212

MVPs

Jahvid Best accepts 2008 Emerald Bowl Offensive MVP trophy
Cal running back Jahvid Best (no. 4) accepts the 2008 Emerald Bowl Offensive MVP trophy from Emerald Bowl Executive Director Gary Cavalli
Game Offensive MVP Defensive MVP
Player Team Pos. Player Team Pos.
2002 Bryan Randall Virginia Tech QB Anthony Schlegel Air Force LB
2003 Derrick Knight Boston College RB T. J. Stancil Boston College FS
2004 Aaron Polanco Navy QB Vaughn Keley Navy CB
2005 Travis LaTendresse Utah WR Eric Weddle Utah CB
2006 Lorenzo Booker Florida State RB Tony Carter Florida State CB
2007 Yvenson Bernard Oregon State RB Derrick Doggett Oregon State LB
2008 Jahvid Best California RB Zack Follett California LB
2009 Damian Williams USC WR Luke Kuechly Boston College LB
Jan. 2011 Rishard Matthews Nevada WR Luke Kuechly Boston College LB
Dec. 2011 Nathan Scheelhaase Illinois QB Terry Hawthorne Illinois DB
2012 Marion Grice Arizona State RB Will Sutton Arizona State DT
2013 Bishop Sankey Washington RB Hau'oli Kikaha Washington DE
2014 Kevin Hogan Stanford QB James Vaughters Stanford LB
2015 Tommy Armstrong Jr. Nebraska QB Jaleel Wadood UCLA S
2016 Joe Williams Utah RB Tegray Scales Indiana LB
2017 Elijah Sindelar Purdue QB Ja'Whaun Bentley Purdue LB
2018 Dillon Mitchell Oregon WR Josiah Scott Michigan State CB

Most appearances

Updated through the December 2018 edition (17 games, 34 total appearances).

Teams with multiple appearances
Rank Team Appearances Record
T1 Boston College 3 1–2
T1 UCLA 3 0–3
T3 Utah 2 2–0
T3 Navy 2 1–1
T3 Maryland 2 0–2
Teams with a single appearance

Won (13): Arizona State, California, Florida State, Illinois, Nebraska, Nevada, Oregon, Oregon State, Purdue, Stanford, USC, Virginia Tech, Washington
Lost (9): Air Force, Arizona, BYU, Colorado State, Georgia Tech, Indiana, Miami (FL), Michigan State, New Mexico

With Oregon's appearance in the 2018 edition, Colorado and Washington State are the only Pac-12 members who have not appeared in the game.

Appearances by conference

Updated through the December 2018 edition (17 games, 34 total appearances).

Rank Conference Appearances Wins Losses Pct.
1 Pac-12[n 1] 12 8 4 .667
T2 Big Ten 6 3 3 .500
T2 ACC 6 1 5 .167
4 Mountain West 4 1 3 .250
5 Independents[n 2] 3 1 2 .333
6 Big East[n 3] 2 2 0 1.000
7 WAC 1 1 0 1.000
  1. ^ Includes appearances when the conference was the Pac-10
  2. ^ Navy (2004, 2012) and BYU (2013)
  3. ^ Virginia Tech (2002) and Boston College (2003) appeared as members of the Big East. Following the 2013 split of the original Big East along football lines, the FBS schools reorganized as the new American Athletic Conference, which retains the charter of the original Big East.

Game records

Team Record, Team vs. Opponent Year
Most points scored 62, Arizona State vs Navy 2012
Most points scored (losing team) 35, Arizona vs Purdue 2017
Most points scored (both teams) 90, Arizona State vs Navy 2012
Fewest points allowed 6, Oregon vs. Michigan State 2018
Largest margin of victory 34, Arizona State vs Navy 2012
Total yards
Rushing yards
Passing yards
First downs
Fewest yards allowed
Fewest rushing yards allowed
Fewest passing yards allowed
Individual Record, Player, Team vs. Opponent Year
All-purpose yards
Touchdowns (overall)
Rushing yards
Rushing touchdowns
Passing yards
Passing touchdowns
Receiving yards
Receiving touchdowns
Tackles
Sacks
Interceptions
Long Plays Record, Player, Team vs. Opponent Year
Touchdown run
Touchdown pass
Kickoff return
Punt return
Interception return
Fumble return
Punt
Field goal
Miscellaneous Record, Team vs. Team Year
Bowl Attendance 42,268, California vs. Miami (FL) 2008

Media coverage

From 2002 through 2015, the bowl was televised by ESPN or ESPN2. Since 2016, it has been carried by Fox.

References

  1. ^ http://www.statisticbrain.com/college-bowl-game-payouts/
  2. ^ McMurphy, Brett (November 11, 2014). "Fight Hunger Bowl Changes Name to Foster Farms Bowl", ESPN. Retrieved November 12, 2014.
  3. ^ "Eye On Football". CBSSports.com. 2008-06-11. Retrieved 2013-12-17.
  4. ^ "Air Force accepts invitation to San Francisco Bowl". 2002-12-04. Retrieved 2017-12-18.
  5. ^ "Kraft Foods to sponsor San Francisco Bowl Game" (Press release). Kraft Foods. April 15, 2010. Retrieved April 15, 2010.
  6. ^ Murphy, Austin, and Dan Wetzel, "Does It Matter?", Sports Illustrated, 15 November 2010, p. 45.
  7. ^ http://sfbowl.org/SplashPage.dbml?SPLASH_AD_ID=1334556
  8. ^ "Foster Farms Bowl". BigTen.org. Big Ten Conference. November 12, 2014. Retrieved November 12, 2014.
  9. ^ "San Francisco 49ers Assume Management of Foster Farms Bowl at Levi's® Stadium". 49ers.com. Forty Niners Football Company LLC. Retrieved 13 July 2016.
  10. ^ "Bay Area bowl changing name for sixth time". ESPN.com. Retrieved 2018-11-18.
  11. ^ "Levi's Stadium picks up sponsor for their annual college bowl game". www.bizjournals.com. Retrieved 2018-11-18.
  12. ^ Bay Area Bowl will feature Pac-12 vs. BIG TEN matchup, Fight Hunger Bowl, June 24, 2013

External links

2002 Virginia Tech Hokies football team

The 2002 Virginia Tech Hokies football team represented the Virginia Tech in the 2002 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team's head coach was Frank Beamer.

2003 Boston College Eagles football team

The 2003 Boston College Eagles football team represented Boston College during the 2003 NCAA Division I-A football season. Boston College was a member of the Big East Conference. The Eagles played their home games at Alumni Stadium in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, which has been their home stadium since 1957.

2003 San Francisco Bowl

The 2003 San Francisco Bowl was the second edition of the post-season college football bowl game between the Colorado State Rams and the Boston College Eagles at Pacific Bell Park in San Francisco on December 31, 2003. The game was the final contest of the 2003 NCAA Division I-A football season for both teams, and ended in a 35–21 victory for Boston College.

2004 Navy Midshipmen football team

The 2004 Navy Midshipmen football team represented the United States Naval Academy (USNA) during the 2004 NCAA Division I-A football season. Navy competed as an independent with no conference affiliation.

The team was led by third-year head coach Paul Johnson. The Midshipmen finished the regular season with a 9–2 record, the first time since the 1963 college football season that Navy had won nine or more games in a season. Wins over Army and the Air Force Falcons secured Navy's second consecutive Commander-in-Chief's Trophy. Navy secured a berth in the 2004 Emerald Bowl when the Pacific-10 Conference did not have enough teams to fill its bowl obligations. The other tie-in was with the Mountain West Conference (MWC), and the Midshipmen ended up playing the New Mexico Lobos. They won the game with a score of 34–19, finishing with a 14-minute, 26-play drive that set the record for the longest drive in a college football game. The win gave the Midshipmen a final record of 10–2, the first time since the 1905 season that the Midshipmen finished with ten or more wins.

2005 Emerald Bowl

The 2005 Emerald Bowl, part of the 2005-06 NCAA football bowl games season, was played on December 29, 2005, at AT&T Park in San Francisco, California. It featured the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets, and the Utah Utes.

2005 Utah Utes football team

The 2005 Utah Utes football team represented the University of Utah in the 2005 NCAA Division I-A football season. This was Kyle Whittingham's first year as head coach after having been promoted from defensive coordinator following the departure of Urban Meyer for Florida. Their 4–4 conference record put them tied for fourth in the conference. The Utes played their homes games in Rice-Eccles Stadium.

2006 Emerald Bowl

The 2006 Emerald Bowl, one of the 2006–07 NCAA football bowl games, was played on December 27, 2006, at AT&T Park in San Francisco, California. It featured the UCLA Bruins, and the Florida State Seminoles.

2007 Emerald Bowl

The 2007 Emerald Bowl, one of the 2007–08 NCAA football bowl games, was played on December 27, 2007, at AT&T Park in San Francisco, California, with the Atlantic Coast Conference represented by the Maryland Terrapins against the Oregon State Beavers, representing the Pacific-10 Conference.

The Terrapins scored all of their 14 points in the first quarter, while the Beavers scored successive touchdowns in the first, second and third quarters to win the game 21–14. Running back Yvenson Bernard and linebacker Derrick Doggett were the game MVPs.

2008 Emerald Bowl

The 2008 Emerald Bowl, part of the 2008-09 NCAA football bowl games season, was played on December 27, 2008, at AT&T Park, the home field of the Giants in San Francisco, California. The Miami Hurricanes of the ACC were matched against the California Golden Bears (based in nearby Berkeley, California) of the Pac-10, the first appearance by either team in the seven-year history of the Emerald Bowl.

With a 24–17 victory over Miami, Cal improved its record to 10–8–1 all-time in bowl games, and 2–2 all-time vs. Miami. Miami fell to 18–14 all-time in bowl games. California and Miami had met three times previously, with Miami holding a 2–1 advantage. The first meeting resulted in a 9–7 win by Cal in Miami on October 10, 1964. Miami won the next two meetings, 31–3 on September 16, 1989, in Miami, and 52–24 on September 15, 1990, in Berkeley.

2009 Emerald Bowl

The 2009 Emerald Bowl was the eighth edition of the college football bowl game, and was played at AT&T Park in San Francisco, California. The game started at 5:00 PM PST on Saturday, December 26, 2009. The game was telecast on ESPN. USC defeated Boston College 24–13.

The presenting sponsor of the 2009 Emerald Bowl was Diamond Foods, promoting its Emerald Nuts brand of snack foods. The company had served as title sponsor of the game for all eight years of the bowl's existence.

2010 Nevada Wolf Pack football team

The 2010 Nevada Wolf Pack football team represented the University of Nevada, Reno in the 2010 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Wolf Pack were led by head coach Chris Ault. They played their home games at Mackay Stadium and were members of the Western Athletic Conference. They finished the regular season 12–1, 7–1 in WAC play to share the conference championship with Boise State and Hawaii. They were invited to the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl where they defeated Boston College 20–13 to finish the season with a 13–1 record.

2011 Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl (December)

The 2011 Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl, the 10th edition of the game, was a post-season American college football bowl game, held on December 31, 2011 at AT&T Park in San Francisco, California as part of the 2011–12 NCAA Bowl season.

The game, which was telecast at 12:30 p.m. Pacific Time (3:30 p.m. Eastern Time) on ESPN, featured the UCLA Bruins (6–7) versus the Illinois Fighting Illini (6–6). The Bruins, with a losing record, were granted a waiver to play in a bowl game by the NCAA after the Pac-12 conference did not have enough eligible teams to fill its bowl commitments. Both teams fired their head coach this season after .500 records. Mike Johnson, who replaced Rick Neuheisel, is the interim coach for UCLA. The Fighting Illini were led by interim coach Vic Koenning while their newly hired head coach Tim Beckman, who replaced Ron Zook, was on the sidelines. UCLA lost the matchup and subsequently finished the season with a losing record (6–8).

2014 Foster Farms Bowl

The 2014 Foster Farms Bowl was an American college football bowl game that was played on December 30, 2014 at Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, California. It was one of the 2014–15 bowl games that concluded the 2014 FBS football season. The 13th edition of the Foster Farms Bowl (previously known as the Fight Hunger Bowl), it featured the Stanford Cardinal from the Pac-12 Conference against the Maryland Terrapins from the Big Ten Conference. The game began at 7:00 p.m. PST and aired on ESPN/ESPN Radio. It was sponsored by the Foster Farms poultry company. Stanford won the game by a final score of 45–21.

2015 Foster Farms Bowl

The 2015 Foster Farms Bowl was an American college football bowl game that was played on December 26, 2015 at Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, California. It was one of the 2015–16 bowl games that concluded the 2015 FBS football season. The 14th edition of the Foster Farms Bowl (previously known as the Fight Hunger Bowl) featured the UCLA Bruins from the Pac-12 Conference against the Nebraska Cornhuskers from the Big Ten Conference. Since there were not enough bowl-eligible teams at the end of the regular season, 5–7 Nebraska was given a spot in this bowl because of its high Academic Progress Rate. Underdog Nebraska was victorious, winning the game 37–29.

2017 Foster Farms Bowl

The 2017 Foster Farms Bowl was an American college football bowl game played on December 27, 2017, at Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, California. It was one of the 2017–18 bowl games concluding the 2017 FBS football season. The 16th edition of the Foster Farms Bowl, the game featured the Arizona Wildcats from the Pac-12 Conference against the Purdue Boilermakers from the Big Ten Conference. It was sponsored by the Foster Farms poultry company.

2018 Oregon Ducks football team

The 2018 Oregon Ducks football team represented the University of Oregon during the 2018 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team was led by first-year head coach Mario Cristobal who took over for Willie Taggart who departed for Florida State. Oregon played their games at Autzen Stadium and competed as members of the North Division of the Pac-12 Conference.

Coming off a 7–6 season under Taggart in 2017, Oregon began the year ranked 24th in the preseason AP Poll. After sweeping their non-conference slate, they fell to then-No. 7 Stanford in overtime. The team bounced back with wins over No. 24 California and No. 7 Washington and rose to 12th in the polls before losing three of their next four games. The Ducks finished the regular season in fourth in the Pac-12 North Division with a conference record of 5–4. They were invited to the Redbox Bowl, where they defeated Michigan State to end the year at 9–4 overall.

The Oregon offense was led by junior quarterback Justin Herbert, who finished in second the Pac-12 Conference with 31 total touchdowns (29 passing and 2 rushing). Running back CJ Verdell finished with 1,018 rushing yards and 10 rushing touchdowns. Defensively, the team was led by defensive end Jalen Jelks, who was named first-team all-conference.

2018 Redbox Bowl

The 2018 Redbox Bowl was a college football bowl game that was played on December 31, 2018 at Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, California, with kickoff at noon PST (3:00 p.m. EST). It was one of the 2018–19 bowl games concluding the 2018 FBS football season. This was the 17th annual edition of a game that has gone by different names, and was known as the Foster Farms Bowl for the previous four years. For 2018 the game was renamed for its new sponsor, the DVD and video game rental company Redbox.

2019 Redbox Bowl

The 2019 Redbox Bowl is a college football bowl game that will be played on December 30, 2019, with kickoff scheduled for 4:00 p.m. EST (1:00 p.m. local PDT) on ESPN. It will be the 18th edition of the Redbox Bowl, though only the second under the current name, and will be one of the 2019–20 bowl games concluding the 2019 FBS football season. The game is sponsored by Redbox, a DVD and video game rental company.

List of Redbox Bowl broadcasters

The following is a list of the television networks and announcers who have broadcast college football's Redbox Bowl throughout the years.

San Francisco / Emerald / Fight Hunger / Foster Farms / Redbox Bowl
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Location
Broadcasters
College Football Playoff
Other bowl games
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