Red Wilson

Robert James "Red" Wilson (March 7, 1929 – August 8, 2014) was a professional baseball and college baseball and football player. He played 10 seasons in Major League Baseball for the Chicago White Sox (1951–1954), Detroit Tigers (1954–1960), and Cleveland Indians (1960), primarily as a catcher.

Red Wilson
Red Wilson 1957
Catcher
Born: March 7, 1929
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Died: August 8, 2014 (aged 85)
Fitchburg, Wisconsin
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 22, 1951, for the Chicago White Sox
Last MLB appearance
September 24, 1960, for the Cleveland Indians
MLB statistics
Batting average.258
Home runs24
Runs batted in189
Teams

University of Wisconsin

Born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin,[1] Wilson attended the University of Wisconsin–Madison where he was a star football player for the Wisconsin Badgers. He won Most Valuable Player honors as the center for the Badgers football team in 1947 and 1948, and was also an all-conference center in 1947.

In his senior year, 1949, Wilson was the team captain and won the Big Ten Most Valuable Player award as an end. Besides, he led the Badgers baseball team in hitting with batting averages of .342 and .426 in 1948 and 1949, respectively. As a pitcher, he posted a 17–7 record and earned a spot in the 1950 College World Series. He graduated from Wisconsin in 1951 as an insurance major.

Major League Baseball

Wilson was selected in the fourth round, 52nd pick overall of the 1950 NFL Draft by the Cleveland Browns under Paul Brown,[2] but opted for a baseball career after leaving Wisconsin. He was signed by the Chicago White Sox as an amateur free agent in 1950, playing 85 games for them from 1951 to 1953. In May 1954, Wilson was traded to the Tigers in exchange for Matt Batts. Wilson played for Detroit during seven seasons years from 1954 through 1960, before ending his career with the Cleveland Indians in 1960.[1]

Wilson served as the primary catcher for Tigers pitcher Frank Lary, who was known as The Yankee Killer because of his 16–3 record against the New York Yankees with Wilson catching. Wilson batted .354 in the 21 games where he was paired with Lary against the Yankees, .096 above his career average.[3]

His most productive season came in 1958, when he played in a career-high 103 games, while collecting a .299 average with a .373 on-base percentage and 10 stolen bases, eighth-best mark in the American League.[1] Wilson also had an excellent year as a catcher in 1958, recording a range factor of 5.93, 0.59 points ahead of the league average for catchers, and caught Jim Bunning's no-hitter against the Boston Red Sox on July 20 of that year.[4] The next season, he improved to a career-high range factor of 6.23 – 0.92 points above the league average.

Overview

In 602 Major League Baseball games, 580 as a catcher, Wilson hit a .258 average and a .338 on-base percentage.[1]

On December 14, 1960, Wilson was selected by the Los Angeles Angels in the 1960 MLB expansion draft, but he retired rather than continue his playing career. Then, pitcher Ted Bowsfield was sent by Cleveland to the Angels in terms of compensation.[5]

Wilson's 1958 baseball card, Topps No. 213, showed him in a truly bizarre pose. The company painted out the natural background of the pictures that year and, in a photo showing Wilson swinging his bat, painted the bat out of the picture too—showing Wilson looking as if his right arm had been amputated a few inches below the shoulder.[6]

Later life

After his playing career, Wilson was a founder and President of the Westgate Bank in Madison, Wisconsin. He was also President of the Wisconsin Alumni Association from 1971 to 1972. Wilson was elected to the Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame in 1990.[7]

Wilson died in 2014 in Fitchburg, Wisconsin, at the age of 85.

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Red Wilson profile". baseball-reference-com. Retrieved 2010-04-25.
  2. ^ "1950 NFL Player Draft". databasefootball.com. Archived from the original on 2008-03-27.
  3. ^ Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame. "Red Wilson". Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame. Retrieved November 27, 2017.
  4. ^ "Detroit Tigers 3, Boston Red Sox 0 (1): Game Played on Sunday, July 20, 1958 (D) at Fenway Park". retrosheet.com. Retrieved 2010-04-25.
  5. ^ "Angels In Order" Blog
  6. ^ VintageCardTraders.com – 1958 Topps baseball card
  7. ^ Thomas H. Murphy (February 1972). "Red Wilson visited". Wisconsin Alumnus. Retrieved 2010-04-25.

External links

1947 All-Big Nine Conference football team

The 1947 All-Big Nine Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Nine Conference teams selected by the Associated Press (AP), United Press (UP) and the International News Service (INS) for the 1947 Big Nine Conference football season. The top vote getters in the AP voting by conference coaches were Leo Nomellini, Bob Chappuis, and Bump Elliott, each receiving 16 of 18 possible points.

1947 Wisconsin Badgers football team

The 1947 Wisconsin Badgers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Wisconsin in the 1947 Big Nine Conference football season. The team compiled a 5–3–1 record (3–2–1 against conference opponents) and finished in second place in the Big Nine Conference. Harry Stuhldreher was in his 12th year as Wisconsin's head coach. The team was ranked No. 9 in the AP Poll before losing to Michigan on November 15, 1947. The team averaged 280.1 yards per game of total offense, 205.9 yards per game by rushing, and 74.2 by passing.The team's statistical leaders included Clarence Self with 526 rushing yards, Jug Girard with 322 passing yards, Tom Bennett with 95 receiving yards, and Lisle Blackbourn, Jr., with 39 points scored. Center Red Wilson received the team's most valuable player award; Wilson also received first-team honors from the Associated Press, United Press, and International News Service on the 1947 All-Big Nine Conference football team. Jack Wink was the team captain.Several Wisconsin records were set during the 1947 season, including the following:

In a game against Iowa on November 8, 1947, Jug Girard set four Iowa single game records: 158 punt return yards; two punt returns for touchdowns, an 85-yard return; and an average of 52.7 yards per return. Three of those record still stand (the record for longest punt return was broken in 1970).

In a game against Purdue on September 27, 1947, Clarence Self set Iowa's single game record with an average of 12.7 yards per carry (10 carries for 127 yards). That record stood for 26 years.

In a game against Michigan on November 15, 1947, Clarence Self set Iowa's single game record with 178 kickoff return yards. That record stood for 60 years.The team played its home games at Camp Randall Stadium. During the 1947 season, the average attendance at home games was 44,200.

1948 Wisconsin Badgers football team

The 1948 Wisconsin Badgers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Wisconsin in the 1948 Big Nine Conference football season. The team compiled a 2–7 record (1–5 against conference opponents) and finished in last place in the Big Nine Conference. Harry Stuhldreher was in his 13th and final year as Wisconsin's head coach. The team averaged 258.6 yards per game of total offense, 200.6 yards per game by rushing, and 58.0 yards by passing.The team's statistical leaders included Ben Bendrick with 327 rushing yards, Bob Petruska with 125 passing yards, Jim Embach with 92 receiving yards, and Wally Dreyer with 24 points scored. Center Red Wilson received the team's most valuable player award for the second consecutive year. Wilson also received second-team honors from the International News Service on the 1948 All-Big Nine Conference football team. Wally Dreyer was the team captain.At the annual Minnesota–Wisconsin football rivalry game held on November 20, 1948, Paul Bunyan's Axe was introduced as a trophy to be awarded to the winner. Minnesota won the 1948 game, 16-0.On December 11, 1948, four days before a student referendum on whether he should keep his job, and in the face of "Goodbye Harry" signs, Harry Stuhldreher resigned as Wisconsin's head football coach, though he retained his job as athletic director.The team played its home games at Camp Randall Stadium. During the 1948 season, the average attendance at home games was 44,167.

1949 Wisconsin Badgers football team

The 1949 Wisconsin Badgers football team represented the University of Wisconsin in the 1949 Big Nine Conference football season.

1951 Chicago White Sox season

The 1951 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 51st season in the major leagues, and its 52nd season overall. They finished with a record 81–73, good for fourth place in the American League, 17 games behind the first place New York Yankees.

1952 Chicago White Sox season

The 1952 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 52nd season in the major leagues, and its 53rd season overall. They finished with a record 81–73, good enough for third place in the American League, 14 games behind the 1st place New York Yankees.

1953 Chicago White Sox season

The 1953 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 53rd season in the major leagues, and its 54th season overall. They finished with a record 89–65, good enough for third place in the American League, 11.5 games behind the first place New York Yankees.

1954 Chicago White Sox season

The 1954 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 54th season in the major leagues, and its 55th season overall. They finished with a record 94–60, good enough for third place in the American League, 17 games behind the first place Cleveland Indians.

1954 Detroit Tigers season

The 1954 Detroit Tigers season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the American League with a record of 68–86, 43 games behind the Cleveland Indians.

1960 Major League Baseball expansion draft

The 1960 MLB Expansion Draft was held by Major League Baseball on December 14, 1960, to fill the rosters of the Los Angeles Angels and the Washington Senators. The Angels and the Senators (who later became the Texas Rangers) were the new franchises that would enter the league in the 1961 season.

Each existing American League club had to make available for the draft seven players on their active roster on August 31, 1960, and eight others from their 40-man roster. The expansion clubs paid $75,000 for each of 28 players they drafted with a maximum of seven players drafted from each existing club, not including minor league selections. They were required to take at least ten pitchers, two catchers, six infielders, and four outfielders. The clubs also had the option of drafting one non-roster player for $25,000 from each established franchise.

1979 Duke Blue Devils football team

The 1979 Duke Blue Devils football team represented the Duke Blue Devils of Duke University during the 1979 NCAA Division I-A football season.

1980 Duke Blue Devils football team

The 1980 Duke Blue Devils football team represented the Duke Blue Devils of Duke University during the 1980 NCAA Division I-A football season.

D. "Red" Wilson

D. "Red" Wilson was a Canadian football player, playing from 1922 to 1931.Primarily playing tackle (called "middle"), Wilson also played guard ("inside") and flying wing. Wilson played for the Toronto Argonauts from 1922 to 1930, including 52 regular season games and a team record 21 playoff games. His best season was 1929, when he was named team captain and won the Jeff Russel Memorial Trophy as best player in the east. He then retired, but returned to the Argos for one more season, and finished his career playing with the Sarnia Imperials in 1931.

Lynton Wilson

Lynton Ronald 'Red' Wilson, (born April 3, 1940) is a Canadian business executive. He served as chairman of the board at both Nortel's and CAE, Chief Executive Officer at BCE, and corporate director of DaimlerChrysler.

Red Wilson (musician)

Oscar O. "Red" Wilson (February 20, 1920 – June 6, 2005) was an American musician and fiddle-maker who played old-time and bluegrass music in North Carolina. He is also the founder of Mayland Recording Studios.

Red Wilson Field

Red Wilson Field is a baseball venue in Yarmouth, Massachusetts, home to the Yarmouth–Dennis Red Sox of the Cape Cod Baseball League. Dennis-Yarmouth Regional High School is located to the southwest of the field.

Shirley Wilson

Shirley Schaub "Red" Wilson (born September 26, 1925) is a former American football coach. He served as the head football coach at Elon University for 1967 to 1976 and at Duke University from 1979 to 1982, compiling a career college football record of 88–61–3.

Wilson was born in 1925 in Madison, North Carolina. Prior to coaching at Elon, he coached football at Richard J. Reynolds High School in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Wilson compiled a 71–35–2 (.667) record at Elon. His 71 wins are the most of any coach in the history of the Elon Phoenix football program. In three of his final four seasons at Elon, he teams won 10 or more games. At Duke, Wilson compiled a 16–27–1 record. He is a member of the North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame and the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County High School Sports Hall of Fame.

Yarmouth–Dennis Red Sox

The Yarmouth–Dennis Red Sox, or Y-D Red Sox, is a collegiate summer baseball team based in South Yarmouth, Massachusetts. The team is a member of the Cape Cod Baseball League and plays in the league's Eastern Division. The Red Sox play their home games at Red Wilson Field on the campus of Dennis-Yarmouth Regional High School in South Yarmouth.

The Red Sox most recently won the Cape Cod Baseball League championship in 2016 when they defeated the Falmouth Commodores two games to one to win the best of three series. Y-D also won league titles in 2004, 2006, 2007, 2014, and 2015, and has made the playoffs 10 times since 2000.

The team is currently led by Cypress College head coach Scott Pickler. He has been with the team since 1998.

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