Red Schoendienst

Albert Fred "Red" Schoendienst (/ˈʃeɪndiːnst/; February 2, 1923 – June 6, 2018) was an American professional baseball second baseman, coach, and manager in Major League Baseball (MLB), and is largely known for his coaching, managing, and playing years with the St. Louis Cardinals. He played for 19 years with the St. Louis Cardinals (1945–1956, 1961–1963), New York Giants (1956–1957) and Milwaukee Braves (1957–1960), and was named to 10 All Star teams. He then managed the Cardinals from 1965 through 1976 – the second-longest managerial tenure in the team's history (behind Tony La Russa). Under his direction, St. Louis won the 1967 and 1968 National League pennants and the 1967 World Series, and he was named National League Manager of the Year in both 1967 and 1968. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1989. At the time of his death, he had worn a Major League uniform for 74 consecutive years as a player, coach, or manager,[1][2][3] and had served 67 of his 76 years in baseball with the Cardinals.

Red Schoendienst
Red Schoendienst1983
Schoendienst in 1983
Second baseman / Manager
Born: February 2, 1923
Germantown, Illinois
Died: June 6, 2018 (aged 95)
Town and Country, Missouri
Batted: Switch Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 17, 1945, for the St. Louis Cardinals
Last MLB appearance
July 7, 1963, for the St. Louis Cardinals
MLB statistics
Batting average.289
Hits2,449
Home runs84
Runs batted in773
Managerial record1,041–955
Winning %.522
Teams
As player

As manager

Career highlights and awards
Member of the National
Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Baseball Hall of Fame Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg
Induction1989
Election MethodVeterans Committee

Early life

Schoendienst was born in Germantown, Illinois, approximately 40 miles (64 km) east of downtown St. Louis to Joe and Mary Schoendienst, one of seven children.[4] His father was a coal miner, and the family lived without running water or electricity.[5]

Schoendienst showed a marked aptitude for baseball at a young age. In school he would handicap himself by hitting left-handed.[4] In 1939, at age 16, he dropped out of school to join the Civilian Conservation Corps, a major public works employment program within President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal. While working on a fence, he suffered a serious injury to his left eye from a nail. Many doctors recommended removal of the eye, but eventually Red found one willing to pursue non-surgical treatment. He endured constant headaches and years of rehabilitation.[5]

After the eye injury, Schoendienst found it very difficult to read breaking balls while batting right-handed against right-handed pitchers. To solve the problem, he used the left-handed batting skills he acquired as a youth to become a switch hitter. In the spring of 1942, he participated in a St. Louis Cardinals open tryout with about 400 other hopefuls. Though he was not signed at the tryout, Joe Mathes, the Cardinals' chief scout, later changed his mind and drove to Germantown to sign him for $75 a month ($1,150 in current dollar terms).[5]

Minor leagues and military service (1942–1944)

Schoendienst began his professional career in the D-level Georgia–Florida League with the Albany Cardinals, followed by the Union City Greyhounds of the Class D Kentucky–Illinois–Tennessee League. At Union City, he collected eight hits in his first eight at bats (AB) on his way to batting .407 in six games. In 1943, after playing nine games for the Lynchburg Cardinals in the Class B Piedmont League, he had attained 17 hits in 36 AB. This strong start earned him a promotion to the double-A International League's (IL) Rochester Red Wings, where he batted .337 in 136 games with 21 doubles, six home runs (HR) and 20 stolen bases (SB). His .337 average was the league's best; he won the IL's Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award and gained visibility as a top prospect.[6]

In 1944, still in Rochester, Schoendienst hit .373 in 25 games. He was drafted mid-season into the U.S. Army,[5][7] but received a medical discharge on January 1, 1945, due to his eye injury and sustained trauma incurred while shooting bazookas.[8]

Major league playing career (1945–1963)

Red Schoendienst
Schoendienst circa 1953

The Cardinals invited Schoendienst for spring training in Cairo, Illinois, in 1945. Schoendiest had been a shortstop in the minor leagues. but as the Cardinals had Marty Marion, who had won the National League's (NL) MVP Award in 1944, as their shortstop, St. Louis assigned Schoendienst to be their left fielder.[5] Totaling 137 games in his rookie season, he batted .278 with a league-high 26 SB. In 1946, the Cardinals moved Schoendienst to play second base on their way to their third World Series title in five years. During the 1946 offseason, he won the televised home run derby. With sure hands and quick reflexes, he led the National League's second basemen for seven seasons and handled 320 consecutive chances without an error in 1950. In that season's All-Star Game, he won the contest for the National League with a home run in the top of 14th inning. It was the first All-Star game to go to extra innings.[5] His 1956 league record fielding percentage of .9934 stood for 30 years until broken by Ryne Sandberg.[9]

In a trade that was extremely unpopular with Cardinals fans and his best friend Stan Musial, Schoendienst, along with Jackie Brandt, Bill Sarni, Dick Littlefield and Bobby Stephenson, was sent to the New York Giants for Alvin Dark, Whitey Lockman, Ray Katt and Don Liddle on June 14, 1956. The transaction was made possible after the Cardinals switched Don Blasingame from shortstop to second base to replace Schoendienst.[10] [11]

The following season, the Giants traded Schoendienst to the Milwaukee Braves for Bobby Thomson, Ray Crone, and Danny O'Connell. Schoendienst helped lead the team to its first pennant in nine years,[12] batting .309 and finishing third in the NL MVP vote. In the World Series the Braves defeated the New York Yankees to win their only world championship in Milwaukee, and the franchise's first since 1914. Milwaukee repeated as NL champions in 1958 but lost to the Yankees in their World Series rematch; Schoendienst flied out to Mickey Mantle for the Series' final out.[13]

During the 1958–59 off-season Schoendienst was diagnosed with tuberculosis and underwent a partial pneumonectomy in February 1959. Despite being told that he would never play again, he returned to the Braves in 1960—only to be released at the end of the season. In 1961 he rejoined the Cardinals, first as a pinch hitter, then as a coach when Johnny Keane replaced Solly Hemus as the Cardinals' manager. In his final two playing seasons he served as a player-coach, batting over .300 in both 1962 and 1963.[5]

In 19 seasons as a player, Schoendienst compiled a .289 batting average with 84 home runs, 773 RBI, 1,223 runs, 2,449 hits, 427 doubles, 78 triples and 89 stolen bases in 2,216 games played. His defensive statistics as a second baseman included 4,616 putouts, 5,243 assists, 1,368 double plays, and 170 errors in 10,029 total chances for a .983 fielding average. [14]

Coaching and managerial career (1964–2018)

CardsRetired2
Red Schoendienst's number 2 was retired by the St. Louis Cardinals in 1996.

Keane resigned the day following the Cardinals' 1964 World Series victory over the Yankees, and Schoendienst was named as his replacement.[15] Three years later, the Cardinals defeated the Boston Red Sox—Schoendienst's fourth World Series title, and third as a Cardinal. His managerial record over 12 full seasons (1965–76) and two subsequent stints as interim manager (1980 and 1990) was 1,041 victories and 955 defeats (.522).[16] After two years as a coach for the 1977–78 Oakland Athletics, Schoendienst returned to the Cardinals as coach and special assistant to the general manager. He won his fifth Series title in 1982. He remained an employee of the Cardinals organization with the title of Special Assistant Coach, and in 2017 completed his 72nd consecutive season as a Major League player, coach, or manager.[17]

Schoendienst was a member of five winning World Series teams, all of which were won in seven games: as a player with the Cardinals and Braves in 1946 and 1957 respectively; as the Cardinals manager in 1967; and as a Cardinals coach in 1964 and 1982. He was also a member of three teams that lost the Series after leading three games to one: the 1958 Milwaukee Braves (to the Yankees), the 1968 Cardinals (to the Detroit Tigers), and the 1985 Cardinals (to the Kansas City Royals).[18]

Red Schoendienst 2013
Schoendienst at the 2013 NLCS, Busch Stadium

In 1989, the Veterans Committee elected Schoendienst to the Baseball Hall of Fame.[19] The Cardinals retired his number 2 in 1996.[20] In 1998 he was inducted into the St. Louis Walk of Fame.[21] The Cardinals named Schoendienst, among 21 other former players and personnel, to be inducted into the St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame Museum for the inaugural class of 2014.[22] The Milwaukee Braves Historical Association inducted Schoendienst into the Milwaukee Braves Honor Roll, located in Miller Park, in 2015.[23]

Managerial record

Team From To Regular season record Post–season record
G W L Win % G W L Win %
St. Louis Cardinals 1965 1976 1935 1010 925 .522 14 7 7 .500
St. Louis Cardinals 1980 1980 37 18 19 .486
St. Louis Cardinals 1990 1990 24 13 11 .542
Total 1996 1041 955 .522 14 7 7 .500
Ref.:[16]

Personal life

In 1947, Schoendienst married the former Mary Eileen O'Reilly who died in 1999, after 52 years of marriage.[24] The Schoendiensts had four children. He also had ten grandchildren (though two predeceased him), and seven great-grandchildren. At the time of his death, Schoendienst lived in Town and Country, Missouri, a western suburb of St. Louis,[25] and had served 67 of his 76 years in baseball with the Cardinals.[26]

On November 13, 2017, Schoendienst, 94, became the oldest living member of the Hall of Fame when Bobby Doerr died at 99, and the oldest living manager of a World Series-winning, pennant-winning or post-season team. He was also the last living member of the Cardinals team that won the 1946 World Series, opposing Doerr's Boston Red Sox team. There are no living players who played on an earlier World Series-winning team. He said of Doerr, "I didn't want him to go."[27] He died at age 95 on June 6, 2018.[25]

See also

References

  1. ^ Schoendienst, Red: Baseball Hall of Fame Retrieved September 7, 2011
  2. ^ Jobe, Dave (January 18, 2013). "Red Schoendienst's 90th birthday party". Fox2now.com archive (St. Louis). Retrieved February 28, 2013.
  3. ^ Megdal, H. Cardinal Red For Life. Sports On Earth. Retrieved March 19, 2014.
  4. ^ a b Leggett, William (October 7, 1968). "Manager of the money men". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved February 8, 2014.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g PugetSoundCardsAddict (February 3, 2014). "Cardinals legend preparing for 70th consecutive season in a major league uniform". Viva El Birdos. Retrieved February 9, 2014.
  6. ^ "Title in batting to Schoendienst; Red Wing Shortstop, With .337 Mark, Led in International League – Levy Runner-Up". The New York Times. January 25, 1944. Retrieved June 7, 2018.
  7. ^ "Red Schoendienst minor league statistics & history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved February 8, 2014.
  8. ^ Harlan, B: The St. Louis Cardinals 1971 Official Guide and Record Book, p. 8
  9. ^ Leggett, William (October 7, 1968): Manager Of The Money Men. Sports Illustrated archive Retrieved September 13, 2011
  10. ^ Vanderberg, Bob. Frantic Frank Lane: Baseball's Ultimate Wheeler-Dealer. Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Company, Inc., 2013. Retrieved June 7, 2018
  11. ^ "Alvin Dark". Society for American Baseball Research. Retrieved June 7, 2018.
  12. ^ "Danny O'Connell". Society for American Baseball Research. Retrieved June 7, 2018.
  13. ^ "October 9, 1958: Yankees rally late to beat Braves in Game 7 of World Series". Society for American Baseball Research. Retrieved June 7, 2018.
  14. ^ "Red Schoendienst stats". Baseball Reference. Retrieved June 7, 2018.
  15. ^ https://www.si.com/vault/1968/10/07/550863/manager-of-the-money-men
  16. ^ a b "Red Schoendienst". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 8, 2016.
  17. ^ Eschman, Todd (July 3, 1953). "St. Louis Cardinals legend Red Schoendienst dead at 95 | Belleville News-Democrat". Bnd.com. Retrieved June 7, 2018.
  18. ^ "Red Schoendienst World Series Stats". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved June 7, 2018.
  19. ^ "Vets Name Schoendienst, Al Barlick to Hall of Fame". Los Angeles Times. Associated Press. February 28, 1989. Retrieved June 7, 2018.
  20. ^ "Cardinals great Red Schoendienst dies at 95, was oldest living Hall of Famer". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved June 7, 2018.
  21. ^ St. Louis Walk of Fame. "St. Louis Walk of Fame Inductees". stlouiswalkoffame.org. Retrieved April 25, 2013.
  22. ^ Cardinals Press Release (January 18, 2014). "Cardinals establish Hall of Fame & detail induction process". www.stlouis.cardinals.mlb.com. Archived from the original on January 26, 2014. Retrieved January 29, 2014.
  23. ^ Haudricourt, Tom (April 1, 2015). "Red Schoendienst to make Braves Honor Roll". Archive.jsonline.com. Retrieved June 7, 2018.
  24. ^ "Mary Schoendienst, Wife of Cardinals Great, Dies". St. Louis Post Dispatch. December 14, 1999. Archived from the original on October 14, 2012. Retrieved September 13, 2011 – via Highbeam Business.
  25. ^ a b "Hall of Famer Red Schoendienst dies at 95; he was 'Mr. Cardinal'". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. June 6, 2018.
  26. ^ "Hall of Famer Schoendienst dies at 95: Spent 67 of his 76 years in baseball with Cardinals". MLB.com. June 6, 2018. Retrieved June 6, 2018.
  27. ^ "Schoendienst, 94, now is oldest living Hall of Famer". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. November 14, 2017.

Bibliography

  • Schoendienst, Red; Rains, Bob (1998). Red: A Baseball Life (Hardcover ed.). Champaign, Illinois: Sports Publishing. ISBN 1-57167-200-1.

External links

1955 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1955 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 22nd playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 12, 1955, at Milwaukee County Stadium, the home of the Milwaukee Braves of the National League.

1956 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1956 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 75th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 65th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 76–78 during the season and finished 4th in the National League.

1957 Milwaukee Braves season

The 1957 Milwaukee Braves season was the fifth in Milwaukee and the 87th overall season of the franchise. It was the year that the team won its first and only World Series championship while based in Milwaukee. The Braves won 95 games and lost 59 to win the National League pennant by eight games over the second-place St. Louis Cardinals.

The club went on to the 1957 World Series, where they faced the New York Yankees. Pitcher Lew Burdette was the star and Most Valuable Player, winning three games, including the crucial seventh game played in New York City.

1957 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1957 New York Giants season involved the team finishing in sixth place in the National League with a 69–85 record, 26 games behind the NL and World Champion Milwaukee Braves. It was the team's 75th and final season in New York City before its relocation to San Francisco, California for the following season. The last game at their stadium, the Polo Grounds, was played on September 29 against the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1958 World Series

The 1958 World Series was a rematch of the 1957 World Series, with the New York Yankees beating the defending champion Milwaukee Braves in seven games for their 18th title, and their seventh in 10 years. With that victory, the Yankees became only the second team in Major League Baseball history to come back from a 3–1 deficit to win a best-of-seven World Series; the first was the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1925. (The 1903 Boston Red Sox came back from a 3–1 deficit in a best-of-nine affair.) These teams would meet again in the fall classic thirty-eight years later—by that time, the Braves had moved to Atlanta. As of 2019, this is the most recent World Series featuring the two previous Series winning teams.

1961 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1961 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 80th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 70th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 80–74 during the season and finished fifth in the National League. It was the last season before the NL went to a 162-game schedule the following season to adjust for the new ten-team league.

1962 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1962 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 81st season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 71st season in the National League. The Cardinals went 84–78 during the season and finished 6th in the NL, 17½ games behind the San Francisco Giants. Also in 1962, the Cardinals became the first NL club to wear names on the backs of their uniforms that season.

1963 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1963 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 82nd season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 72nd season in the National League. The Cardinals went 93–69 (.574) during the season, and finished 2nd in the National League, six games behind the eventual World Series champion 8Los Angeles Dodgers. The season was Stan Musial's 22nd and final season with the team, and in MLB.

1977 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1977 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 96th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 86th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 83–79 during the season and finished third in the National League East, 18 games behind the Philadelphia Phillies.

Vern Rapp took over as the Cardinals' manager this year, after the twelve-year reign of their longtime manager Red Schoendienst. On August 29, Cardinals left-fielder Lou Brock broke the modern-day stolen base record, by stealing bases 892 and 893 in a game against the Padres in San Diego.

1980 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals 1980 season was the team's 99th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 89th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 74-88 during the season and finished fourth in the National League East, 17 games behind the eventual NL pennant and World Series champion Philadelphia Phillies.

The Cardinals played the season under four different managers, Ken Boyer (fired June 8 between games of a double-header against the Expos in Montreal), Jack Krol (the second game of the double-header that same day), Whitey Herzog (June 9 until he was hired as the team's general manager in late August, succeeding John Claiborne, who was fired earlier in August) and Red Schoendienst (from late August to end of season). After the season, Herzog reclaimed the managerial job.

This team set a record for the most Silver Slugger Award winners in one season: Keith Hernández (first base), Garry Templeton (shortstop), George Hendrick (outfielder), Ted Simmons (catcher), and Bob Forsch (pitcher). Hernández also won a Gold Glove.

1989 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1989 followed the system in place since 1978.

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and

elected two, Johnny Bench and Carl Yastrzemski.

The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions to consider older major league players as well as managers, umpires, executives, and figures from the Negro Leagues.

It also selected two people, Al Barlick and Red Schoendienst.

1990 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1990 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 109th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 99th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 70-92 during the season and finished 6th (and last) in the National League East division, 25 games behind the NL East champion Pittsburgh Pirates. It was one of the few times that the Cardinals had finished in last place, and the first, and only time that it has happened since 1918.

Bob Broeg

Robert William Patrick Broeg (March 18, 1918 – October 28, 2005) was an American sportswriter.

Born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri, he officially covered the St. Louis Cardinals for forty years. He graduated from Cleveland High School (Class of '36) and the University of Missouri before entering the United States Marines. He served in Washington as a result of an eye injury suffered at birth.

After the war, Broeg joined the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. He was privy to many important events in baseball history. Broeg was partially responsible for the famous picture of Eddie Gaedel at the plate in 1951. He told the photographer to stay at the game until Gaedel came to the plate and the picture was taken.

Later, he helped Bob Gibson win the 1967 World Series. Gibson was unable to get breakfast at the Cardinals' hotel in Boston, so Broeg delivered a ham and egg sandwich to the star right-hander. Gibson pitched a complete game and carried his team to victory.

Among other things, Broeg is known for coining the nickname "Stan the Man" for Cardinal baseball player Stan Musial, championing the Hall of Fame causes of Cardinals Red Schoendienst, Enos Slaughter and Chick Hafey and helping to devise, and successfully push for the first pension plan for veteran major-league players.

Broeg was named to the Board of Directors of the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1972, a position he held for 28 years. He was also a longtime member of the Committee on Baseball Veterans. His knowledge was reported to be encyclopedic, even into his 80s. His willingness to share that knowledge with everyone from colleagues and loyal readers to complete strangers at the ballpark or on the street endeared him to fans spanning multiple generations. He penned his last column in 2004.

The St. Louis chapter of the Society for American Baseball Research is named for Bob Broeg. He was awarded the J. G. Taylor Spink Award in 1979. He was elected to the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Hall of Fame in 1997.

Broeg said he wished his epitaph to read, "Hopefully, he was fair, as in just, not as in mediocre." Appropriately, Bob Broeg died five hours after the final game of the 2005 World Series. He was 87.

International League Most Valuable Player Award

The International League Most Valuable Player Award (MVP) is an annual award given to the best player in minor league baseball's International League. Managers from the 14 International League teams vote for the winner of the award, which is then combined with 14 votes from various general managers, broadcasters, and media representatives around the league to determine a winner. In 1932, Marv Owen won the first ever International League MVP Award.

First basemen, with 23 winners, have won the most among infielders, followed by third basemen (16), shortstops (9), and second basemen (5). Five catchers have won the award. Twenty-nine outfielders have won the MVP Award, the most of any position. A total of 4 pitchers have won the MVP award. The last pitcher to win was Red Barrett in 1942. The International League League now has a Most Valuable Pitcher Award, which was established in 1953. Rocky Nelson has the record for most MVP Award wins with three (1953, 1955, and 1958). Roberto Petagine has won the MVP Award twice.

Three International League MVP Award winners, Red Schoendienst, Jim Rice, and Jim Thome, have gone on to be inducted in the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

List of St. Louis Cardinals coaches

The St. Louis Cardinals, based in St. Louis, Missouri, are a professional baseball franchise that compete in the National League of Major League Baseball (MLB). The club employs coaches who support – and report directly to – the manager. Coaches for various aspects of the game, including pitching, hitting, baserunning and fielding, give instruction to players to assist them in exercising the major disciplines that must be successfully executed to compete at the highest level. These specialized roles are a relatively new development, as coaches initially did not have specific roles and instead had titles such as "first assistant", "second assistant", etc. St. Louis Cardinals coaches have played an important role in the team's eleven World Series titles. Many are retired players who at one time played for the team. Coaching is often part of the path for Major League managerial hopefuls, as a coach's previous experiences typically include managing and/or coaching at the minor league level. Charley O'Leary and Heinie Peitz, both former Cardinals players, became the first coaches the Cardinals employed as positions separate from the manager in 1913.

The longest-tenured coach in Cardinals' franchise history is Red Schoendienst, who has filled a variety of roles for the St. Louis Cardinals. First, he played 15 seasons as a second baseman for the Cardinals before becoming an on-field coach in 1962 in his penultimate season as an active player. He continued to coach through 1964, and the next season, became the Cardinals' manager. Returning as an on-field coach for the Cardinals in 1979, Schoendienst remained in that capacity until 1995. Since 1996, he has served as a special assistant to the general manager as a coaching advisor. In all, Schoendienst has coached for St. Louis for 38 total seasons. He has also worn a St. Louis Major League uniform in eight different decades, won four World Series titles as part of on-field personnel and two more World Series titles since moving into his role as an advisor.The current longest-tenured coach through 2015 is third-base coach José Oquendo, who has been coaching for the Cardinals since 1999. The latest addition is assistant hitting coach Bill Mueller, who was hired before the 2015 season. The longest-tenured on-field coach in franchise history is Buzzy Wares; he is also the only coach for the Cardinals with a consecutive on-field season streak of 20 or more seasons with 23. Schoendienst is the only other with 20 or more total seasons; he also had a streak of 17 consecutive seasons. Dave Duncan and Dave McKay are both tied for third with 16 total seasons and both with a streak of 16 consecutive seasons. Jose Oquendo is also tied with Duncan and McKay with 16 years during the 2015 season as it marks his 16 consecutive season as an on field coach. Others with ten or more seasons include Mike González, Johnny Lewis, Marty Mason, Gaylen Pitts and Dave Ricketts. Dal Maxvill is the only former Cardinals coach to have become a general manager for the Cardinals. Ray Blades, Ken Boyer, González, Johnny Keane, Jack Krol, Marty Marion, Bill McKechnie, Schoendienst and Harry Walker have all also managed the Cardinals. Cardinals coaches who have been elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum include Bob Gibson, McKechnie and Schoendienst.

List of St. Louis Cardinals managers

The St. Louis Cardinals, a professional baseball franchise based in St. Louis, Missouri, compete in the National League (NL) of Major League Baseball (MLB). Prior to entering the NL in 1892, they were also a member of the American Association (AA) from 1882 to 1891. They have won 11 World Series titles as an NL team, one pre-World Series championship and tied another against the NL. Since 1900, the team has been known as the Cardinals. They were originally named the Perfectos. Baseball teams like St. Louis employ a manager to make on-field decisions for the team during the game, similar to the head coach position of other sports. A number of coaches report to the manager, including the bench coach, first and third base coaches, and pitching and hitting coaches, among other coaches and instructors. Mike Matheny, a former catcher for the Cardinals from 2000 to 2004, was the manager from 2012-2018, when he was relieved following a series of disputes, including allegations that he would not speak with Dexter Fowler. He was signed through 2017 and extended to the 2018 season when he was fired. The Cardinals hired bench coach Mike Shildt as interim manager.Matheny is one of 63 total individuals who have managed the Cardinals, more than any other Major League franchise. Between 1882 and 1918 – 37 total seasons – 37 different managers stayed the helm. Ned Cuthbert became the first manager of the then-Brown Stockings in 1882, serving for one season. Also an outfielder for a former St. Louis Brown Stockings club, he was directly responsible for bringing professional baseball back to St. Louis after a game-fixing scandal expelled the earlier team from the NL in 1877. He rallied a barnstorming team that attracted the attention of eventual owner Chris von der Ahe, who directly negotiated for the team to be a charter member of a new league, the AA, in 1882. Charles Comiskey was the first manager in franchise history to hold the position for multiple seasons. He also owns the highest career winning percentage in franchise history at .673, four American Association pennants (1885–1888) and one interleague championship (before the official World Series existed). He also held the record for most career wins in team history with from 1884 to 1945 (563 total) and games managed (852) until 1924. However, von der Ahe changed managers more than any other owner in team history – a total of 27 in 19 season oversaw the team on the field. After the Robison era began, stability marginally improved: nine managers in 20 years from 1899 to 1918. Jack McCloskey, Roger Bresnahan, and Miller Huggins each managed three or more seasons from 1906 to 1917, becoming the first group to manage multiple seasons in succession.

Branch Rickey, known mainly as a general manager, surpassed Comiskey's record for games managed in 1924, totaling 947 in seven seasons. His replacement, Rogers Hornsby – also the second baseman who won two Triple Crowns and six consecutive batting titles – finally guided the Cardinals to their first modern World Series championship against the formidable New York Yankees, their first interleague championship in exactly 40 years. Sam Breadon, the Cardinals' owner, also frequently changed managers (although Frankie Frisch and Gabby Street both managed at least five seasons and won one World Series title apiece in the 1930s out of nine total managers in 30 seasons) until settling on Hall of Famer Billy Southworth from 1940 to 1945.

Southworth set new team records for games managed (981), wins (620) and World Series championships (two). His Cardinals teams won 105 or more games each year from 1942 to 1944, winning the NL pennants in each of those three seasons. His .642 winning percentage is second-highest in team history, and the highest since the Cardinals joined the National League. Southworth was also awarded the Sporting News Manager of the Year Award in 1941 and 1942. Starting in 1953 with the Gussie Busch/Anheuser-Busch era, thirteen managers captained the club in 43 seasons. After Southworth, Eddie Dyer, Eddie Stanky, Fred Hutchinson and Johnny Keane also each took home a Sporting News Manager of the Year award. Keane's 1964 team that year's World Series. Hall of Famer Red Schoendienst took over from 1965 to 1977 and won one World Series and two NL pennants. Schoendienst then broke Southworth's team records for games (1,999 total) and wins (1,041). He also held records of 14 seasons managed and 955 losses.

In the 1980s, Hall of Famer Whitey Herzog's style of play known as Whiteyball pushed the Cardinals to three NL pennants and a World Series championship in 1982. He was named the Sporting News Sportsman of the Year and Manager of the Year in 1982. In 1990, Joe Torre took over and Tony La Russa succeeded him when the William DeWitt, Jr. ownership – still the current ownership – commenced in 1996. La Russa finished with the longest tenure in franchise history (16 seasons), and leads Cardinals managers in wins (1,408), losses (1,182), playoff appearances (nine) and is tied for most World Series championships (two). He also won three NL pennants. Matheny took over from La Russa. With DeWitt ‘s era, the Cardinals have seen their greatest period of managerial stability with just two managers.

Besides La Russa, eight Cardinals managers have won a modern World Series: Hornsby, Frisch, Street, Dyer, Southworth, Keane, Schoendienst and Herzog; Southworth and La Russa are the only ones to win two each. Comiskey won one pre-World Series title and tied for another. Cardinals managers inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame include Comiskey, Tommy McCarthy, Roger Connor, Kid Nichols, Bresnahan, Huggins, Rickey, Hornsby, Bill McKechnie, Southworth, Frisch, Schoendienst, Herzog, Torre and La Russa.

List of St. Louis Cardinals team records

The St. Louis Cardinals, a professional baseball franchise based in St. Louis, Missouri, compete in the National League (NL) of Major League Baseball (MLB). in 1892. Before joining the NL, they were also a charter member of the American Association (AA) from 1882 to 1891. Although St. Louis has been the Cardinals' home city for the franchise's entire existence, they were also known as the Brown Stockings, Browns, and Perfectos.

In 134 seasons, the franchise has won more than 10,000 regular season games and appeared in 27 postseasons while claiming 12 interleague championships, tying one other, and 23 league pennants. 11 of the interleague championships are World Series titles won under the modern format since 1903; the other championship and tie occurred in 1885–1886. 19 of the league pennants are NL pennants, and the other four are AA pennants. Their 11 World Series titles represent the most in the NL and are second in MLB only to the New York Yankees' 27.

Notable players have defined, in part, the Cardinals' success and history. Stan Musial owns the most career batting records with 22. Rogers Hornsby owns the most single-season records with 11. Bob Gibson owns the most career pitching records with 18. Silver King owns the most single-season pitching records with nine.

Second baseman

In baseball and softball, second baseman is a fielding position in the infield, between second and first base. The second baseman often possesses quick hands and feet, needs the ability to get rid of the ball quickly, and must be able to make the pivot on a double play. In addition, second basemen are usually right-handed; only four left-handed throwing players have ever played second base in Major League Baseball since 1950. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the second baseman is assigned the number 4.

Good second basemen need to have very good range since they have to field balls closer to the first baseman who is often holding runners on, or moving towards the base to cover. On a batted ball to right field, the second baseman goes out towards the ball for the relay. Due to these requirements, second base is sometimes a primarily defensive position in the modern game, but there are hitting stars as well.

St. Louis Cardinals

The St. Louis Cardinals are an American professional baseball team based in St. Louis, Missouri. The Cardinals compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) Central division. Busch Stadium has been their home ballpark since 2006. One of the most successful franchises in baseball history, the Cardinals have won 11 World Series championships, the second-most in Major League Baseball (behind the New York Yankees) and the most in the National League. Their 19 National League pennants rank third in NL history. In addition, St. Louis has won 13 division titles in the East and Central divisions.

While still in the old American Association (AA), named then as the St. Louis Browns, the team won four AA league championships, qualifying them to play in the professional baseball championship tournament (a forerunner of the modern World Series, established 1903) of that era. They tied in 1885 and won outright in 1886 and lost in 1888 for the early trophy Hall Cup versus the New York Giants. The others both times against the Chicago Cubs (originally the Chicago White Stockings then), in the first meetings of the Cardinals–Cubs rivalry between nearby cities of St. Louis and Chicago that continues to this day.

With origins as one of the early professional baseball clubs in St. Louis and the nation, entrepreneur Chris von der Ahe purchased a barnstorming club in 1881, then known as the Brown Stockings, and established them as charter members of the old American Association (AA) base ball league which played 1882 to 1891, the following season. Upon the discontinuation of the AA, St. Louis joined the continuing National League of Professional Base Ball Clubs, later known simply as the National League, (organized in 1876), in 1892; at that time, they were called the Browns (not to be confused with a later team also known as the St. Louis Browns in the American League, 1902-1953) and also as the Perfectos before they were officially renamed eight years later as the Cardinals in 1900.

Cardinals achievements that have impacted MLB and sports events in general include manager/owner Branch Rickey's pioneering of the farm system, Rogers Hornsby's two batting Triple Crowns, Dizzy Dean's 30-win season in 1934, Stan Musial's 17 MLB and 29 NL records, Bob Gibson's 1.12 earned run average (ERA) in 1968, Whitey Herzog's Whiteyball, Mark McGwire breaking the single-season home run record in 1998, and the 2011 championship team's unprecedented comebacks. The Cardinals have won 105 or more games in four different seasons and won 100 or more a total of nine times. Cardinals players have won 20 league MVPs, four batting Triple Crowns, and three Cy Young Awards. Baseball Hall of Fame inductees include Lou Brock, Dizzy Dean, Bob Gibson, Whitey Herzog, Rogers Hornsby, Joe Medwick, Stan Musial, Branch Rickey, Red Schoendienst, Ozzie Smith, and Bruce Sutter.

In 2018, Forbes valued the Cardinals at $1.9 billion, making them the 7th-most valuable franchise in MLB; their revenue the previous year was $319 million, and their operating income was $40.0 million. Since their purchase in 1995, owner William DeWitt, Jr.'s investment group has seen enormous growth from the $147 million purchase price. John Mozeliak is the President of Baseball Operations, Mike Girsch is the general manager and Mike Shildt is the manager. The Cardinals are renowned for their strong fan support: despite being in one of the sport's mid-level markets, they routinely see attendances among the league's highest, and are consistently among the Top 3 in MLB in local television ratings.

BBWAA Vote
Veterans Committee
J. G. Taylor Spink Award
Ford C. Frick Award
Pitchers
Catchers
First basemen
Second basemen
Third basemen
Shortstops
Outfielders
Designated hitters
Managers
Executives /
pioneers
Umpires
Inducted as a Cardinal
Inductees who played
for the Cardinals
Cardinals managers
Cardinals executives
Frick Award
Spink Award

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