Red Rolfe

Robert Abial "Red" Rolfe (October 17, 1908 – July 8, 1969) was an American third baseman, manager and front-office executive in Major League Baseball. A graduate of Phillips Exeter Academy, Rolfe also was an Ivy Leaguer: a graduate, then long-time athletic director of Dartmouth College, and (from 1943–46) baseball and basketball coach at Yale University.

Rolfe was a native of Penacook, New Hampshire. He batted left-handed, threw right-handed, and was listed as 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m) tall and 170 pounds (77 kg).

Red Rolfe
RedRolfeGoudeycard
Third baseman / Manager
Born: October 17, 1908
Penacook, New Hampshire
Died: July 8, 1969 (aged 60)
Gilford, New Hampshire
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
June 29, 1931, for the New York Yankees
Last MLB appearance
September 27, 1942, for the New York Yankees
MLB statistics
Batting average.289
Home runs69
Runs batted in497
Managerial record278–256
Winning %.521
Teams
As player
As manager
Career highlights and awards

Playing career

During his playing career, Rolfe was the starting third baseman on the New York Yankees of the late 1930s. The "Bronx Bombers" of Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio, Bill Dickey, Lefty Gomez and Red Ruffing won American League pennants from 1936–39 and took all four World Series in which they appeared, winning 16 games and losing only three in Fall Classic play over that span. Rolfe played 10 major league seasons, all with New York, batting .289 with 69 home runs and 497 RBI in 1,175 games. His finest season came in 1939, when he amassed 213 hits, 139 runs scored, and 46 doubles while hitting .329 with 14 home runs and 80 runs batted in. He retired following the 1942 season.

College and MLB coach

Red Rolfe and Ray Meyer
Rolfe and Ray Meyer in 1942

After his four-year coaching stint at Yale, Rolfe coached the Toronto Huskies of the BAA in 1946–1947 and returned to the Yankees as a coach. After the 1947 season, Rolfe joined the Detroit Tigers as director of their farm system. But he returned to the field after only one season, when he succeeded Steve O'Neill as Tiger manager after the 1948 campaign.

Manager of Detroit Tigers

In 1949, Rolfe's first season as manager, the Tigers improved by nine games and returned to the first division. Then, in 1950, they nearly upset the Yankees, winning 95 games and finishing second, three games behind. A fluke botched double play was the team's undoing. Late in September at Cleveland, the Indians had the bases loaded in the tenth inning with one out and the score tied. Visibility was poor because smoke from Canadian forest fires was blowing across Lake Erie. On an apparent 3-2-3 double-play grounder to first base, Detroit catcher Aaron Robinson thought he simply needed to touch home plate for a force play to retire the Indians baserunner charging in from third. But in the smoky conditions Robinson had not seen that a putout had already been made at first base, necessitating that the catcher tag the runner, not the plate, to record an out. Robinson mistakenly tagged the plate, the run counted and Cleveland won the game. It was the turning point in the pennant race, for the postwar Tigers, and for Rolfe's managerial career.

Beset by an aging starting rotation, the Tigers faltered in 1951, slipping to 73 wins and finishing fifth, 25 games behind New York. Then Detroit completely unraveled in 1952, winning only 23 of 72 games under Rolfe. On July 5, he was fired and replaced by one of his pitchers, Fred Hutchinson. The 1952 club won only 50 games, losing 104 – the first time ever that the Tigers lost 100 or more games.

Dartmouth athletic director

Rolfe then returned to Dartmouth as the athletic director of his alma mater from 1954 to 1967. The college's baseball diamond is named in his honor. Rolfe died in Gilford, New Hampshire, in 1969 at age 60 of chronic kidney disease.[1] He was buried in his birthplace of Penacook.

See also

References

  1. ^ Ex-Yankee Red Rolfe succumbs

External links

1934 New York Yankees season

The 1934 New York Yankees season was the team's 32nd season in New York and its 34th season overall. The team finished with a record of 94–60, finishing 7 games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. It would also be the final year Babe Ruth would play as a Yankee.

1935 New York Yankees season

The 1935 New York Yankees season was the team's 33rd season in New York and its 35th season overall. The team finished with a record of 89–60, finishing 3 games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1937 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1937 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the fifth playing of the mid-summer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 7, 1937, at Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C., the home of the Washington Senators of the American League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 8–3.

The game, watched by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, is remembered because of a play in which Earl Averill of the Indians hit a ball that struck pitcher Dizzy Dean on the toe, breaking it. Complications of this injury shortened the career of the future Baseball Hall of Fame pitcher.

1939 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1939 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the seventh playing of the mid-summer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 11, 1939, at Yankee Stadium in The Bronx, New York City, the home of the New York Yankees of the American League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 3–1.

1940 New York Yankees season

The 1940 New York Yankees season was the team's 38th season in New York and its 40th overall. The team finished in third place with a record of 88–66, finishing two games behind the American League champion Detroit Tigers and one game behind the second-place Cleveland Indians. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. Their home games were played at the Yankee Stadium.

1943 World Series

The 1943 World Series matched the defending champion St. Louis Cardinals against the New York Yankees, in a rematch of the 1942 Series. The Yankees won the Series in five games for their tenth championship in 21 seasons. It was Yankees manager Joe McCarthy's final Series win. This series was also the first to have an accompanying World Series highlight film (initially, the films were created as gifts to troops fighting in World War II, to give them a brief recap of baseball action back home), a tradition that still persists.

This World Series was scheduled for a 3–4 format because of wartime travel restrictions. The 3–4 format meant there was only one trip between ballparks, but if the Series had ended in a four-game sweep, there would have been three games played in one park and only one in the other.

Because of World War II, both teams' rosters were depleted. Johnny Beazley, Jimmy Brown, Creepy Crespi, Terry Moore and Enos Slaughter were no longer on the Cardinals' roster. Joe DiMaggio, Phil Rizzuto, Red Ruffing and Buddy Hassett were missing from the Yankees, and Red Rolfe had retired to coach at Dartmouth College.

Cardinals pitchers Howie Pollet, Max Lanier and Mort Cooper ranked 1–2–3 in the National League in ERA in 1943 at 1.75, 1.90 and 2.30, respectively.

1949 Detroit Tigers season

The 1949 Detroit Tigers season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record of 87–67, 10 games behind the New York Yankees.

1950 Major League Baseball season

The 1950 Major League Baseball season began on April 18 and ended on October 7, 1950 with the New York Yankees winning the World Series championship, over the Philadelphia Phillies. The only no-hitter of the season was pitched by Vern Bickford on August 11, in the Boston Braves 7–0 victory over the Brooklyn Dodgers. This season saw the first use of a bullpen car, by the Cleveland Indians.

1952 Detroit Tigers season

The 1952 Detroit Tigers had a record of 50–104 (.325) — the worst record in Tigers' history until the 2003 Tigers lost 119 games. Virgil Trucks became the third pitcher in major league history to throw two no-hitters in one season.

2004 Ivy League Baseball Championship Series

The 2004 Ivy League Baseball Championship Series took place at Red Rolfe Field at Biondi Park in Hanover, New Hampshire on May 8, 2004. The series matched the regular season champions of each of the league's two divisions. Princeton, the winner of the series, claimed their second consecutive, and fifth overall, title and the Ivy League's automatic berth in the 2004 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament. It was Princeton's ninth appearance in the Championship Series, all of which were consecutive.Dartmouth made their third appearance in the Championship Series, also having lost to Princeton in 2000 and 2001.

2008 Ivy League Baseball Championship Series

The 2008 Ivy League Baseball Championship Series took place at Red Rolfe Field at Biondi Park in Hanover, New Hampshire on May 6 and 7, 2008. The series matched the regular season champions of each of the league's two divisions. Columbia, the winner of the series, claimed the Ivy League's automatic berth in the 2008 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament. It was Columbia's first Championship Series victory.Dartmouth made their fourth appearance in the Championship Series, and first since 2004. They had yet to win the event.

2009 Ivy League Baseball Championship Series

The 2009 Ivy League Baseball Championship Series took place at Red Rolfe Field at Biondi Park in Hanover, New Hampshire on May 2 and 3, 2009. The series matched the regular season champions of each of the league's two divisions. Dartmouth, the winner of the series, claimed the Ivy League's automatic berth in the 2009 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament. It was Dartmouth's first Championship Series victory, coming in their fifth appearance.Cornell defeated Princeton in a one-game playoff to advance to the Championship Series and represent the Lou Gehrig Division. The playoff was held on April 29, 2009 at Hoy Field in Ithaca, New York.

2014 Ivy League Baseball Championship Series

The 2014 Ivy League Baseball Championship Series was held at Robertson Field at Satow Stadium on the campus of Columbia in New York, NY on May 10. The series matched the regular season champions of each of the league's two divisions, Columbia and Dartmouth in a rematch of the 2013 edition. Columbia again won the series in two games to claim the Ivy League's automatic berth in the 2014 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament.With the ties for both division leads, tiebreakers were played on the originally scheduled weekend of May 3 and 4 and the Championship series was delayed one week. Tiebreakers were played between Penn and Columbia for the Lou Gehrig Division title and between Yale and Dartmouth to decide the Red Rolfe Division.Columbia defeated Penn by a score of 4–0 in the tiebreaker for the Lou Gehrig Division. The game was held on May 3 at Meiklejohn Stadium on Penn's campus in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, with Lions senior David Speer extending his scoreless innings streak to 23, recording 9 strikeouts, and allowing just five hits and two walks. Columbia appears in the championship series for the second year in a row and fifth overall.In the tiebreaker for the Red Rolfe Division, Dartmouth defeated Yale by a score of 11–4. The game was held on May 4 at Dartmouth's home field, Red Rolfe Field at Biondi Park in Hanover, New Hampshire. Big Green starter Beau Sulser exited in the second inning due to an apparent elbow injury, and was replaced by sophomore Duncan Robinson. Robinson completed 5.1 innings to earn his seventh win, tied for most in the Ivy League in 2014. Dartmouth extended its winning streak to eight games and represents the Red Rolfe Division in the Championship Series for the seventh year in a row.As Columbia compiled the best record in the Ivy League in 2014, they hosted the series at Robertson Field at Satow Stadium in New York, NY.

Dartmouth Big Green baseball

The Dartmouth Big Green baseball team is the varsity intercollegiate baseball program of the Dartmouth College, located in Hanover, New Hampshire. It has been a member of the NCAA Division I Ivy League baseball conference since its founding at the start of the 1993 season. Before that it was a member of the Eastern Intercollegiate Baseball League (EIBL). Its home venue is Red Rolfe Field at Biondi Park, located on the university's campus. Bob Whalen has been the program's head coach since the start of the 1990 season. The program has appeared in seven NCAA Tournaments and one College World Series. In conference postseason play, it has been EIBL Champion twelve times and has appeared in the Ivy League Baseball Championship Series 11 times, winning twice. 30 former Big Green have appeared in Major League Baseball.

Hank Borowy

Henry Ludwig "Hank" Borowy (May 12, 1916 – August 23, 2004) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball. From 1942 through 1951, Borowy played for the New York Yankees (1942–45), Chicago Cubs (1945–48), Philadelphia Phillies (1949–50), Pittsburgh Pirates (1950) and Detroit Tigers (1950–51). He batted and threw right-handed.

Born in Bloomfield, New Jersey, Borowy graduated from Bloomfield High School and Fordham University. He pitched in six World Series games and posted a 108–82 record with 690 strikeouts and a 3.50 earned run average (ERA) in 1,717 innings.Borowy debuted on April 18, 1942 with the Yankees, finishing with a 15–4 record, 85 strikeouts and a 2.82 ERA. He started Game 4 of the World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals and did not receive a decision.

In 1943, Borowy went 14–9 with 107 strikeouts and a 2.82 ERA and won Game 3 of the World Series against St. Louis. Named an All-Star in 1944, he pitched three scoreless innings in the game, ending the season with a 17–12 record, 107 strikeouts and a 2.64 ERA.

In 1945 Borowy posted a 10–5 record with the Yankees in the first half of the season. The 1945 All Star game was cancelled due to wartime travel restrictions, but Borowy was selected a "virtual" All Star in an unofficial poll of managers conducted by the Associated Press. At the All-Star break he was placed on waivers by the Yankees, and eventually sold to the Cubs for $100,000 ($1,391,682 in current dollar terms). Borowy went 11–2 for the remainder of the season, including three wins over the Cardinals down the stretch, and led the National League in winning percentage (.846) and ERA (2.14), as the Cubs won the pennant. His combined 1945 Yankees/Cubs record was 21–7 with 82 strikeouts and a 2.65 ERA. Borowy is one of two pitchers in major league history to win at least 10 games for two different teams in the same season (the other is Bartolo Colón, with the Cleveland Indians and Montreal Expos, in 2002).

On October 3, 1945, the Detroit Tigers and Cubs met in the World Series for the fourth time. In the opener Borowy pitched a six-hit, 9–0 shutout. He lost the fifth game, and then came back to win the sixth with four scoreless relief innings. Borowy started the final game on one day's rest but gave up hits to the first three batters before leaving. He took the loss and the Tigers won the Series. Before the 2016 World Series, Borowy was the last Chicago Cubs pitcher to win a World Series game.

He is also the fourth and last pitcher to hit two doubles in the same inning, on May 5, 1946. The previous three pitchers were Fred Goldsmith, Joe Wood, and Ted Lyons.For the remainder of his career, Borowy was plagued by finger blisters and a chronic sore shoulder. He pitched his final game on September 14, 1951. Just prior to his retirement, he performed one of the worst pitching performances ever seen in Major League baseball. Playing against the St Louis Browns on the 18th of August, Borowy was called up to pitch in the bottom of the seventh inning, with the game tied at 7-all. Borowy faced nine batters, and was unable to achieve an out, giving up four singles, four walks and a three-run home run, before being pulled from the game by Tigers manager Red Rolfe. No other pitcher has faced nine batters in a game and not managed an out.Borowy grew up in Bloomfield, New Jersey and was a longtime resident of Brick Township, New Jersey, where he died at age of 88.

Ivy League Baseball Championship Series

The Ivy League Baseball Championship Series is the conference baseball championship of the NCAA Division I Ivy League. The top two finishers from the round-robin regular season participate in a best of three series held at campus sites, with the winner earning the conference's automatic bid to the NCAA Division I Baseball Championship. In 2018, Columbia defeated host Yale in two games.

Jack Saltzgaver

Otto Hamlin "Jack" Saltzgaver (January 23, 1903 – February 1, 1978) was an American professional baseball player. The native of Croton, Iowa, an infielder, appeared in 278 Major League Baseball games for the New York Yankees (1932; 1934–1937) and the Pittsburgh Pirates (1945).

Saltzgaver batted left-handed, threw right-handed, stood 5 feet 11 inches (180 cm) tall and weighed 165 pounds (75 kg; 11.8 st). His best MLB season came with the 1934 Yankees. At age 31, he was the Bombers' most-used third baseman, appearing in 84 games at the position. He batted a career-high .271 and set personal bests in home runs (6) and runs batted in (36). The following year, he was supplanted by Red Rolfe as the Yanks' starter at the hot corner.

At the time he played for the Pirates, during the last season of the World War II manpower shortage, the 42-year-old Saltzgaver was the oldest active Major League player.

Penacook, New Hampshire

Penacook, originally called "Fisherville", is a village within the city of Concord in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, United States. It lies along Concord's northern border with Boscawen. The name comes from the Pennacook tribe that lived in the area. "Penacook" (Pennycook) was the original name of the plantation incorporated by present-day Concord.

Penacook is located along a stretch of the Contoocook River that falls 100 feet (30 m) in slightly over 1 mile (1.6 km), just before joining the Merrimack River. Early hydro-powered industry was attracted to the site, and Penacook grew as a mill town. While dams on the river still generate electricity, most of the 19th- and 20th-century factories, such as Allied Leather, have long since closed.Penacook has its own phone exchange (753), which includes a portion of Boscawen, and its own ZIP code (03303), shared with Boscawen, Webster, and parts of northern Concord east of the Merrimack River. Most of Penacook is located in the Merrimack Valley School District, though part is in the Concord School District.

Red Rolfe Field at Biondi Park

Red Rolfe Field at Biondi Park is a baseball venue in Hanover, New Hampshire, United States. It is home to the Dartmouth Big Green baseball team of the NCAA Division I Ivy League. The field has a capacity of 2,000 spectators. The field portion of the facility is named for Red Rolfe, Dartmouth Class of 1931, former New York Yankees player and Dartmouth athletic director from 1954-1967.In 2008, a $5.2 million donation of two Dartmouth alumni, Michael J. (Class of 1979) and Cynthia Ginn (Class of 1980) Biondi, allowed for extensive renovations of the facility. The playing surface was changed from natural grass to FieldTurf and shifted slightly toward left field. The installation of turf allowed for increased use of the field during late fall and early spring. 650 permanent seats, with space for more than 1,000 additional seats, were added. Other new features included a new scoreboard, press box, dugouts, bullpens, and batting cages. Following the renovations, the park portion of the facility was dedicated Biondi Park in honor of the two donors.In 2012, college baseball writer Eric Sorenson ranked the park as the third best small venue in Division I baseball.

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