Red Murray

John Joseph "Red" Murray (March 4, 1884 – December 4, 1958) was an American outfielder in Major League Baseball.

Red Murray
Red Murray
Outfielder
Born: March 4, 1884
Arnot, Pennsylvania, U.S.
Died: December 4, 1958 (aged 74)
Sayre, Pennsylvania, U.S.
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
June 16, 1906, for the St. Louis Cardinals
Last MLB appearance
October 3, 1916, for the New York Giants
MLB statistics
Batting average.270
Home runs37
Runs batted in579
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Career

Murray was born in Arnot, Pennsylvania. In 1902, he attended Lock Haven College, where he played football, basketball, and baseball. In 1904, Murray changed schools to the University of Notre Dame, playing as a catcher for the Fighting Irish. In 1906, he was signed by the St. Louis Cardinals, and the next year he played at right field and hit seven home runs. During the season, Murray hit a 471-foot (144 m) home run. In 1908, he played in all 154 games and finished second in the National League in stolen bases (48), and third both in hits (167) and home runs (7).

Murray was traded to the New York Giants and helped win John McGraw three consecutive pennants. From 1909 to 1912, he ranked third in the league in runs batted in, trailing only Honus Wagner and Sherry Magee. Murray and Wagner tied for the most home runs in the majors from 1907 through 1909 (21).[1] Murray last played in the majors in 1917.

J.C. Kofoed, in the April 1924 issue of Baseball Magazine wrote:

"Red Murray was for years noted as one of the greatest outfielders in the National League. His throwing arm was the best ever, his ground covering ability and sureness of eye were classic. Furthermore, he was remarkably fast as a base runner, and noted as a batter as well. In his seven seasons as a regular, Murray led NL outfielders in home runs, runs batted in, stolen bases, and assists a total of 16 times. Despite his impressive statistics in power hitting, baserunning, and fielding, he remains one of the least-recognized stars of the Deadball Era."

Murray died on December 4, 1958 of acute leukemia at the age of 74 in a hospital near Sayre, Pennsylvania.[2] His obituary ranked him "with Mel Ott as one of the two greatest right fielders in New York Giant history."

See also

References

  1. ^ Red Murray. Article by Cappy Gagnon. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on October 13, 2018.
  2. ^ Obituary. The Deadball Era. Retrieved on October 13, 2018.

External links

1906 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1906 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 25th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 15th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 52–98 during the season and finished 7th in the National League.

1907 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1907 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 26th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 16th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 52–101 during the season and finished eighth and last in the eight-team National League.

1908 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1908 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 27th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 17th season in the National League. The Cardinals had a 49–105 win-loss record during the season and finished 8th (last) in the National League. The season's attendance of 185,377, an average of less than 2,500 a game, which remains the lowest peacetime attendance level since 1901. The Cardinals set a Major League record which stills stands for the fewest base on balls by a team in a season, with 282. Additionally, they hold the MLB record for fewest runs scored in a season with 372, only 2.42 runs per contest.

1909 Major League Baseball season

The 1909 Major League Baseball season. The Pittsburgh Pirates defeated the Detroit Tigers 4–3 to win the World Series.

1909 New York Giants season

The 1909 New York Giants season was the franchise's 27th season. The team finished in third place in the National League with a 92–61 record, 18½ games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1909 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1909 throughout the world.

1910 New York Giants season

The 1910 New York Giants season was the franchise's 28th season. The team finished in second place in the National League with a 91-63 record, 13 games behind the Chicago Cubs.

The Giants offense scored the most runs in the NL. Fred Snodgrass had his breakthrough season, finishing fourth in the batting race and also leading the team in on-base percentage and OPS.

Their pitching staff was once again led by Hall of Famer Christy Mathewson, who won a league-best 27 games. His 1.89 earned run average ranked third.

1911 New York Giants season

The 1911 New York Giants season was the franchise's 29th season. It involved the Giants winning their first of three consecutive National League pennants. They were beaten by the Philadelphia Athletics in the World Series.

Led by manager John McGraw, the Giants won the NL by 7½ games. On the offensive side, they finished second in total runs scored. On the defensive side, they allowed the fewest. Hall of Famer Christy Mathewson led the league in ERA, and Rube Marquard had the most strikeouts.

Taken together with the 1912 and 1913 pennant winners, this team is considered one of the greatest of all-time.

1912 New York Giants season

The 1912 New York Giants season was the franchise's 30th season. It involved the Giants winning the National League pennant. They were beaten by the Boston Red Sox in the World Series. Fred Snodgrass took most of the blame, as he dropped a fly ball in the deciding contest.Led by manager John McGraw, the Giants dominated the NL, opening the season 54-11 and building a 16 1/2-game lead by July 3. On the offensive side, they easily led the league in runs scored. Larry Doyle finished fourth in the batting race and was voted league MVP. Chief Meyers had one of the greatest offensive seasons ever for a catcher and was second in batting.They had arguably the best pitching staff, too. Jeff Tesreau, Hall of Famer Christy Mathewson, and Red Ames finished 1–2–5 in league ERA. Rube Marquard's 18-game winning streak was the top story in baseball.

Taken together with the 1911 and 1913 pennant winners, this team is considered one of the greatest of all-time. It also makes up a good portion of the 1966 book The Glory of Their Times, as Marquard, Meyers, and Snodgrass were three of the players interviewed.

1913 New York Giants season

The 1913 New York Giants season was the franchise's 31st season. It involved the Giants winning the National League pennant for the third consecutive year. Led by manager John McGraw, the Giants dominated the NL and finished 12½ games in front of the second place Philadelphia Phillies. They were beaten by the Philadelphia Athletics in the 1913 World Series.

Ace pitcher Christy Mathewson went 25–11 and led the NL with a 2.06 ERA. Rube Marquard and Jeff Tesreau also won over 20 games, and the Giants easily allowed the fewest runs of any team in the league.

Taken together with the 1911 and 1912 pennant winners, this team is considered one of the greatest of all-time. The roster was basically unchanged from 1912.

1914 New York Giants season

The 1914 New York Giants season was the franchise's 32nd season. The team finished in second place in the National League with an 84-70 record, 10½ games behind the "Miracle Braves." They had finished first the three previous years.

This team featured two Hall of Fame pitchers: Christy Mathewson, one of the greatest ever, and Rube Marquard, whose selection is considered by some to be unfortunate.

1914 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1914 throughout the world.

1915 Chicago Cubs season

The 1915 Chicago Cubs season was the 44th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 40th in the National League and the 23rd and final at West Side Park. The Cubs finished fourth in the National League with a record of 73–80.

1915 New York Giants season

The 1915 New York Giants season was the franchise's 33rd season. The team finished eighth in the eight-team National League with a record of 69–83, 21 games behind the Philadelphia Phillies.

1917 New York Giants season

The 1917 New York Giants season was the franchise's 35th season. It involved the Giants winning the National League pennant for the first time in four years. The team went on to lose to the Chicago White Sox in the 1917 World Series, four games to two.

1958 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1958 throughout the world.

Arnot, Pennsylvania

Arnot is a census-designated place located in Bloss Township, Tioga County in the state of Pennsylvania. It is located off US Route 15 near the borough of Blossburg. As of the 2010 census the population was 332 residents. Entertainer Johnny J. Jones and professional baseball player Red Murray were born there.

Behind Prison Gates

Behind Prison Gates is a 1939 American crime film directed by Charles Barton and written by Arthur T. Horman and Leslie T. White. The film stars Brian Donlevy, Julie Bishop, Joseph Crehan, Paul Fix, George Lloyd and Dick Curtis. The film was released on July 28, 1939, by Columbia Pictures.

Notre Dame Fighting Irish baseball

The Notre Dame Fighting Irish baseball team represents the University of Notre Dame in NCAA Division I college baseball. Notre Dame competes as a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference and plays its home games at Frank Eck Stadium in Notre Dame, Indiana.

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