Red Dooin

Charles Sebastian "Red" Dooin (June 12, 1879 – May 12, 1952) was an American professional baseball player and manager. A catcher in Major League Baseball during the first two decades of the 20th century, he played 1,219 of his 1,290 games as a member of the Philadelphia Phillies and managed the Phils from 1910 through 1914.

Red Dooin
Red Dooin baseball card
Catcher / Manager
Born: June 12, 1879
Cincinnati, Ohio
Died: May 12, 1952 (aged 72)
Rochester, New York
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 18, 1902, for the Philadelphia Phillies
Last MLB appearance
June 24, 1916, for the New York Giants
MLB statistics
Batting average.240
Home runs10
Runs batted in344
Managerial record392–370
Winning %.514
Teams
As player

As manager

Biography

Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, Dooin began his career with the St. Joseph, Missouri, club of the Western League in 1900. Two years later, he reached the Phillies and the National League, catching in 84 games. He was the club's regular catcher from 1904 through 1910, and although a broken ankle and a broken leg — suffered in plays at home plate in 1910 and 1911 — curtailed his playing career, he stayed in the majors as a catcher through 1916. A right-handed hitter, he batted .240 with ten career home runs. Oddly, six of those home runs came in one season: 1904, Dooin's first season as a full-time regular.

In 1910, Dooin succeeded Billy Murray as manager of the Phils; under Murray, the Quakers had placed fifth in 1909. Player-manager Dooin piloted the Phillies for five years and compiled a winning record (392–370, .514). Moreover, along with fellow catcher and player-coach Pat Moran, he nurtured the great pitcher Grover Cleveland Alexander to stardom in his earliest big league seasons. The Phillies rose to second place in the 1913 NL, but when they fell to sixth the following season, Dooin was replaced by Moran as the team's skipper.

Still an active player, he then was traded to the Cincinnati Reds and, ultimately, the New York Giants, where he played his final two seasons in the Majors. He caught 111 shutouts during his career, ranking him 20th all-time among major league catchers.[1]

Dooin died of a heart attack in Rochester, New York at the age of 72, and was laid to rest at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery.[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ "The Encyclopedia of Catchers - Trivia December 2010 - Career Shutouts Caught". The Encyclopedia of Baseball Catchers. Retrieved 29 December 2015.
  2. ^ Find A Grave. Retrieved November 12, 2006.

External links

1902 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1902 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the National League with a record of 56–81, 46 games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1903 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1903 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the National League with a record of 49–86, 39½ games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1904 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1904 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1905 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1905 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished fourth in the National League with a record of 83 wins and 69 losses.

1906 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1906 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished fourth in the National League with a record of 71 wins and 82 losses.

1907 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1907 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1908 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1908 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished fourth in the National League with a record of 83 wins and 71 losses.

1909 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1909 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1910 Major League Baseball season

The 1910 Major League Baseball season.

1910 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1910 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1911 Major League Baseball season

The 1911 Major League Baseball season was the last season in which none of the current 30 MLB stadiums were in use. The oldest current ballpark is Fenway Park, opened in 1912.

1911 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1911 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished fourth in the National League with a record of 79 wins and 73 losses.

1912 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1912 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the National League with a record of 73–79, 30½ games behind the first-place New York Giants.

1913 Major League Baseball season

The 1913 Major League Baseball season.

1913 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1913 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Phillies competing in the National League and finishing in second place.

1914 Major League Baseball season

The 1914 Major League Baseball season.

1914 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1914 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1915 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1915 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the National League with a record of 71–83, 20 games behind the Philadelphia Phillies.

Fred Abbott

Harry Frederick Abbott (October 22, 1874 – June 11, 1935) was an American Major League Baseball catcher. Born Harry Frederick Winbigler, he played three seasons of Major League baseball for the Cleveland Naps and the Philadelphia Phillies.

Began career as a teenager with Marion (Interstate League) in 1891. Abbot played with independent Ohio teams Springfield and Dayton in 1892 and 1893 respectively before joining the San Antonio Missionaries of the Texas-Southern League in 1895. In 1897 he was playing with the Cairo Egyptians in the Central League. By 1898, he was with the Southern League's New Orleans Pelicans, where he batted .265 in 15 games, while playing mostly in the outfield. Abbott joined Danville of the Indiana–Illinois League the following season, and remained with them when they joined the Central League the next year. Abbott batted a very respectable .318 with three home runs and stole 14 bases over 83 games. He rejoined the New Orleans Pelicans, batting .296 for them in 1901, and .289 in 1902, playing over 100 each season.

Abbott made his major league baseball debut with the Cleveland Naps a week into the 1903 season, on April 29 against the St. Louis Browns. He would go on to play a total of 77 games as a backup catcher behind Harry Bemis, batting .235 with a single home run to go with 25 RBI and eight stolen bases.

1904 found Abbott's playing time diminished, along with his batting average. Splitting his time in the backup role this time, with Fritz Buelow and rookie Harry Ostdiek Abbott batted a meager .169 with no homers and only a dozen RBI before being sent down to the Columbus Senators of the American Association where he finished the season going .222 over 34 games. In January 1905 he was traded to the Philadelphia Phillies for infielder Rudy Hulswitt.

In his final season in the major leagues Abbott was used primarily as backup for Phillies starter Red Dooin Abbott nearly duplicated his previous season with the Naps, hitting .195 to go with his dozen RBI in 42 games. Following the season his contract was purchased by the Toledo Mud Hens. Abbott would spend the next five years with Toledo primarily as a starter. His most notable season being 1908, in which he batted .331. In his final season as a player Abbott was starting for the Los Angeles Angels of the Pacific Coast League where he played in 110 games hitting .215 with a home run.

His interment was located at Valhalla Memorial Park Cemetery.

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