Red Corriden

John Michael "Red" Corriden (September 4, 1887 – September 28, 1959) was a player, coach, manager and scout in American Major League Baseball. A shortstop and third baseman in his playing days, Corriden appeared in 223 big league games with the St. Louis Browns (1910), Detroit Tigers (1912) and Chicago Cubs (1913–15), batting .205 with 131 hits. He was born in Logansport, Indiana.

Red Corriden
Shortstop / Third baseman / Manager
Born: September 4, 1887
Logansport, Indiana
Died: September 28, 1959 (aged 72)
Indianapolis, Indiana
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 8, 1910, for the St. Louis Browns
Last MLB appearance
May 15, 1915, for the Chicago Cubs
MLB statistics
Batting average.205
Home runs6
Runs batted in47
Teams
As player

As coach

As manager

Career highlights and awards
  • World Series champion (1947)

Involvement in 1910 controversy

He had an important role in the 1910 Chalmers Award batting title controversy. When playing third base, he was ordered by catcher Jack O'Connor to play back, giving Nap Lajoie a good chance to beat out bunts for hits that could help win the award for Lajoie instead of the widely hated Ty Cobb, who had been leading in the batting average race prior to the last-day's doubleheader, .385 to .376.

Minor league manager, MLB coach

After his playing career ended, Corriden coached and managed in the minor leagues during the 1920s. In 1932 he was named a coach with the Cubs. As a Major League coach for the next 17 years, Corriden would assist managers such as Rogers Hornsby, Charlie Grimm, Gabby Hartnett, Leo Durocher and Bucky Harris with the Cubs (1932–40), Brooklyn Dodgers (1941–46) and New York Yankees (1947–48) — working for five pennant-winning teams and one World Series champion.

The Yankees' "raiding" of Corriden and Chuck Dressen from the coaching staff of Durocher's Dodgers was one of the factors in the public feud between Durocher and Yankee president Larry MacPhail that spilled into print in early 1947. When a newspaper column under Durocher's name accused MacPhail of allowing known gamblers to use his box seats at spring training games in Havana, Cuba, Commissioner of Baseball Happy Chandler initiated an investigation that resulted in Durocher's suspension for the entire 1947 campaign.

White Sox manager

Corriden left the Yankees after the 1948 season. He began 1950 in the familiar role of coach for the Chicago White Sox when his only MLB managing chance occurred. On May 26, 1950, with the Sox only 8–22 and last in the American League, skipper Jack Onslow was dismissed and Corriden, 62 years old at the time, finished out the season. Under Corriden, the White Sox won only 52 of 124 games, but climbed two places, finishing sixth. He returned to the Dodgers in 1951, as a scout. His son, John M. Jr., an outfielder in professional baseball, had a brief big-league trial as a pinch runner with Brooklyn in 1946.

Death

Red Corriden died in Indianapolis, Indiana, at 72 from a heart attack suffered while watching the 1959 National League tie-breaker series between the Milwaukee Braves and the Dodgers on television.

External links

1910 Chalmers Award

The 1910 Chalmers Award scandal was an incident in which a Major League Baseball team, the St. Louis Browns, tried but failed to give Nap Lajoie the batting title over Ty Cobb.

1910 St. Louis Browns season

The 1910 St. Louis Browns season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Browns finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 47 wins and 107 losses.

1912 Detroit Tigers season

The 1912 Detroit Tigers season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Tigers finishing sixth in the American League. It was the team's first season in Tiger Stadium.

1913 Chicago Cubs season

The 1913 Chicago Cubs season was the 42nd season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 38th in the National League and the 21st at West Side Park. The Cubs finished third in the National League with a record of 88–65.

1914 Chicago Cubs season

The 1914 Chicago Cubs season was the 43rd season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 39th in the National League and the 22nd at West Side Park. The Cubs finished fourth in the National League with a record of 78–76.

1915 Chicago Cubs season

The 1915 Chicago Cubs season was the 44th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 40th in the National League and the 23rd and final at West Side Park. The Cubs finished fourth in the National League with a record of 73–80.

1933 Chicago Cubs season

The 1933 Chicago Cubs season was the 62nd season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 58th in the National League and the 18th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished third in the National League with a record of 86–68.

1934 Chicago Cubs season

The 1934 Chicago Cubs season was the 63rd season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 59th in the National League and the 19th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished third in the National League with a record of 86–65.

1936 Chicago Cubs season

The 1936 Chicago Cubs season was the 65th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 61st in the National League and the 21st at Wrigley Field. The Cubs tied with the St. Louis Cardinals for second in the National League with a record of 87–67.

1937 Chicago Cubs season

The 1937 Chicago Cubs season was the 66th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 62nd in the National League and the 22nd at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished second in the National League with a record of 93–61.

1939 Chicago Cubs season

The 1939 Chicago Cubs season was the 68th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 64th in the National League and the 24th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished fourth in the National League with a record of 84–70.

1940 Chicago Cubs season

The 1940 Chicago Cubs season was the 69th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 65th in the National League and the 25th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished fifth in the National League with a record of 75–79.

1944 Brooklyn Dodgers season

The 1944 Brooklyn Dodgers saw constant roster turnover as players left for service in World War II. The team finished the season in seventh place in the National League.

1945 Brooklyn Dodgers season

As World War II was drawing to a close, the 1945 Brooklyn Dodgers finished 11 games back in third place in the National League race.

1950 Chicago White Sox season

The 1950 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 50th season in the major leagues, and its 51st season overall. They finished with a record 60–94, good enough for sixth place in the American League, 38 games behind the first place New York Yankees.

1950 Major League Baseball season

The 1950 Major League Baseball season began on April 18 and ended on October 7, 1950 with the New York Yankees winning the World Series championship, over the Philadelphia Phillies. The only no-hitter of the season was pitched by Vern Bickford on August 11, in the Boston Braves 7–0 victory over the Brooklyn Dodgers. This season saw the first use of a bullpen car, by the Cleveland Indians.

Hickory Rebels

The Hickory Rebels were a Class D minor league baseball team based in Hickory, North Carolina, that played from 1939–1940, 1940, 1945–1954, 1960. The Rebels were the predecessor of the current Hickory Crawdads in the South Atlantic League.

Jack Onslow

John James Onslow (October 13, 1888 – December 22, 1960) was an American player, manager, coach and scout in Major League Baseball. A catcher during his playing days, he spent a dozen years in the minor leagues, but only 36 games played in the majors. The native of Scottdale, Pennsylvania, threw and batted right-handed, stood 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m) tall and weighed 180 pounds (82 kg).

At age 60, Onslow became one of the oldest rookie managers in MLB annals when he was named skipper of the Chicago White Sox in the fall of 1948, succeeding Hall of Fame pitcher Ted Lyons. Onslow managed the South Siders for the entire 1949 season, finishing sixth in the American League with a 63–91 record. Compounding matters, he could not get along with his boss, Chisox general manager Frank Lane, and clashed with players and the Chicago press. He avoided being fired by Lane when vice president Chuck Comiskey, son of the White Sox' owner, Grace Comiskey, stepped in on Onslow's behalf at the close of 1948. But, after a poor start to 1950, when the White Sox dropped 22 of their first 30 contests, Onslow was replaced by one of his coaches, Red Corriden. His career record as a manager: 71 wins, 113 defeats (.386).

In Onslow's 36 games as a major league catcher for the 1912 Detroit Tigers and 1917 New York Giants, he batted only .169 with 13 total hits. But he would become a popular baseball figure as a longtime coach for a number of teams, including the Pittsburgh Pirates (1925–26), Washington Senators (1927), St. Louis Cardinals (1928), Philadelphia Phillies (1931–32) and Boston Red Sox (1934). In addition, he scouted for the White Sox and Boston Braves for several years and was holding a similar job with the Red Sox when he died, at 72, in Concord, Massachusetts, from a heart attack in 1960. To people around the game, Onslow was known as one of the most garrulous raconteurs of his day.

Onslow also managed minor league clubs for six seasons. His Memphis Chicks won 92 games in 1948, finishing second in the Southern Association, prompting his promotion to manager of the parent White Sox. Onslow's younger brother, Eddie, also played Major League Baseball and managed in the minor leagues.

John Corriden

John Michael Corriden Jr. (January 6, 1918 in Logansport, Indiana – June 4, 2001 in Indianapolis, Indiana) was an American major league baseball player. He made one appearance in a baseball game with the Brooklyn Dodgers as a pinch runner on April 20, 1946. He was an outfielder during his minor league career.

He was the son of former Dodger, Chicago Cubs, New York Yankees and Chicago White Sox coach Red Corriden.

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