Red Barnes

Emile Deering Barnes (December 25, 1904 – July 3, 1959) was an American outfielder in Major League Baseball who played from 1927 through 1930 for the Washington Senators and Chicago White Sox. Listed at 5' 10", 158 lb., Barnes batted left handed and threw right handed. He was born in Suggsville, Alabama. His cousin, Sam Barnes, also played in the majors.[1]

Barnes posted a .269 batting average in 286 career games.[1] In between, he played in the Minor Leagues in all or parts of 14 seasons spanning 1927–1994, hitting .269 with 100 home runs in 1,413 games.[2]

Besides, Barnes was a quarterback for Wallace Wade's Alabama Crimson Tide football teams, starting in the 1927 Rose Bowl.[3]

Barnes died in 1959 in Mobile, Alabama, at the age of 54.[1]

Red Barnes
Outfielder
Born: December 25, 1904
Suggsville, Alabama
Died: July 3, 1959 (aged 54)
Mobile, Alabama
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 29, 1927, for the Washington Senators
Last MLB appearance
September 20, 1930, for the Chicago White Sox
MLB statistics
Batting average.269
Home runs8
Runs batted in97
Teams
Red Barnes
Redbarnes
Barnes depicted c. 1926
Alabama Crimson Tide
PositionHalfback/Quarterback
ClassGraduate
Career history
CollegeAlabama (1925–1926)
Bowl games
Personal information
Born:December 25, 1904
Suggsville, Alabama
Died:July 3, 1959 (aged 54)
Mobile, Alabama
Weight172 lb (78 kg)
Career highlights and awards

Sources

  1. ^ a b c Baseball Almanac
  2. ^ Baseball Reference
  3. ^ "Pasadena Clash Has National Grid Flavor". The Ogden Standard-Examiner. December 26, 1926. p. 13. Retrieved March 4, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. open access

External links

1903 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1903 throughout the world.

1923 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1923 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1923 Southern Conference football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 30th overall and 2nd season as a member of the Southern Conference (SoCon). The team was led by head coach Wallace Wade, in his first year, and played their home games at Denny Field in Tuscaloosa, at Rickwood Field in Birmingham and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery, Alabama. They finished the season with a record of seven wins, two losses and one tie (7–2–1 overall, 4–1–1 in the SoCon).

1923 marked the first season for new head coach Wallace Wade, a former assistant at Vanderbilt. One year after Alabama's triumphal trip to Penn, the Tide went on another northeast roadtrip with a different outcome, losing to Syracuse 23–0. Against Georgia Tech, Alabama was very lucky to escape with a 0–0 tie. After defeating Georgia, the Tide was the favorite for a Southern title. A season-ending, 16–6 upset loss to coach James Van Fleet's Florida Gators cost coach Wade and the Tide the Southern Conference championship.

1924 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1924 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1924 Southern Conference football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 31st overall and 3rd season as a member of the Southern Conference (SoCon). The team was led by head coach Wallace Wade, in his second year, and played their home games at Denny Field in Tuscaloosa, at Rickwood Field in Birmingham and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery, Alabama. They finished the season with a record of eight wins and one loss (8–1 overall, 5–0 in the SoCon), as Southern Conference champions and won the Champ Pickens Trophy.

Alabama opened the season with six consecutive shutout victories. After they defeated Union University at Tuscaloosa, the Crimson Tide defeated Furman in their first road contest of the season. Alabama returned to Tuscaloosa where they defeated Mississippi College a week prior to their victory over Sewanee at Birmingham in their SoCon opener. The Crimson Tide continued their dominance with victories at Georgia Tech and in Montgomery against Ole Miss before they allowed their first points of the season in their homecoming victory over Kentucky. Alabama then closed the season with a pair of games at Birmingham where they first lost their lone game against Centre and defeated Georgia in their final game and captured their first SoCon championship.

1925 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1925 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1925 Southern Conference football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 32nd overall and 4th season as a member of the Southern Conference (SoCon). The team was led by head coach Wallace Wade, in his third year, and played their home games at Denny Field in Tuscaloosa, at Rickwood Field in Birmingham and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery, Alabama. They finished the season with their first ever perfect record (10–0 overall, 7–0 in the SoCon), as Southern Conference champions and as national champions after they defeated Washington in the Rose Bowl.The Crimson Tide entered the season as the defending Southern Conference champions after finishing the 1924 season with an 8–1 record. Alabama would then go on and shutout all but one of their regular season opponents en route to a second consecutive Southern Conference championship. The Crimson Tide then accepted an invitation to participate as the first Southern team in the annual Rose Bowl Game, where they defeated Washington 20–19. This victory has subsequently been recognized as one of the most important in Southern football history as well as has been deemed "the game that changed the South."

1926 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1926 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1926 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 33rd overall and 5th season as a member of the Southern Conference (SoCon). The team was led by head coach Wallace Wade, in his fourth year, and played their home games at Denny Field in Tuscaloosa, at Rickwood Field in Birmingham and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery, Alabama. They finished the season with a record of nine wins, zero losses and one tie (9–0–1 overall, 8–0 in the SoCon), as Southern Conference champions. They tied undefeated Stanford in the Rose Bowl. The 1926 Alabama team was retroactively named as the 1926 national champion by Berryman QPRS, Billingsley Report, College Football Researchers Association, and Poling System, and as a co-national champion by the Helms Athletic Foundation and National Championship Foundation.

1926 College Football All-Southern Team

The 1926 College Football All-Southern Team consists of American football players selected to the College Football All-Southern Teams selected by various organizations for the 1926 Southern Conference football season. Alabama won the SoCon and national championship.

1927 Washington Senators season

The 1927 Washington Senators won 85 games, lost 69, and finished in third place in the American League. They were managed by Bucky Harris and played home games at Griffith Stadium.

1928 Washington Senators season

The 1928 Washington Senators won 75 games, lost 79, and finished in fourth place in the American League. They were managed by Bucky Harris and played home games at Griffith Stadium.

1929 Washington Senators season

The 1929 Washington Senators won 71 games, lost 81, and finished in fifth place in the American League. They were managed by Walter Johnson and played home games at Griffith Stadium.

1930 Chicago White Sox season

The 1930 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 30th season in the major leagues, and its 31st season overall. They finished with a record 62–92, good enough for 6th place in the American League, 40 games behind the 1st place Philadelphia Athletics.

1930 Washington Senators season

The 1930 Washington Senators won 94 games, lost 60, and finished in second place in the American League. They were managed by Walter Johnson and played home games at Griffith Stadium.

1937 Boston Red Sox season

The 1937 Boston Red Sox season was the 37th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fifth in the American League (AL) with a record of 80 wins and 72 losses.

1938 Boston Red Sox season

The 1938 Boston Red Sox season was the 38th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League (AL) with a record of 88 wins and 61 losses.

1939 Boston Red Sox season

The 1939 Boston Red Sox season was the 39th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League (AL) with a record of 89 wins and 62 losses.

1940 Boston Red Sox season

The 1940 Boston Red Sox season was the 40th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 82 wins and 72 losses.

1942 Boston Red Sox season

The 1942 Boston Red Sox season was the 42nd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League (AL) with a record of 93 wins and 59 losses.

1944 Boston Red Sox season

The 1944 Boston Red Sox season was the 44th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 77 wins and 77 losses.

Oneonta Red Sox

The Oneonta Red Sox were a minor league baseball team based in Oneonta, New York.

The first incarnation of the team played in the first New York–Pennsylvania League in 1924. On August of that year, the Utica Utes relocated to Oneonta to finish their season as the Oneonta Indians. In Oneonta, the club posted an 18–22 record. However prior to the next season, the club relocated to Shamokin, Pennsylvania, to become the Shamokin Shammies.

The second incarnation of the team can be traced back to 1940 when the Can-Am League's Cornwall Maple Leafs relocated to Oneonta and played their home games at Damaschke Field. The club played until 1942 as the Oneonta Indians, winning league titles in 1941 and 1942. However the league suspended operation until 1946, due to World War II. However the team did reemerge that season as the Red Sox. Throughout its entire history the second incarnation of the club was affiliated with the Boston Red Sox.

Frank Malzone played third base for one season in Oneonta in 1949 before moving up the minor league system. The club then won two more titles, in 1948 and in the league's final season of 1951.

In 1966 a new Oneonta Red Sox team was established and played in the Class A New York–Penn League.

Sam Barnes

Samuel Thomas Barnes (December 18, 1899 – February 19, 1981) was a Major League Baseball (MLB) player. Barnes played for the Detroit Tigers in the 1921 season.

Barnes was born in Suggsville, Alabama and died in Montgomery, Alabama.

He was the cousin of former Major Leaguer, Red Barnes.

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