Red Badgro

Morris Hiram "Red" Badgro (December 1, 1902 – July 13, 1998) was an American football player and football coach who also played professional baseball. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1981.

A native of Orillia, Washington, he attended the University of Southern California (USC) where he played baseball, basketball, and football. He then played nine seasons of professional football as an end for the New York Yankees (19271928), New York Giants (19301935), and Brooklyn Dodgers (1936). He was selected as a first-team All-Pro in 1931, 1933, and 1934. He scored the first touchdown in the first NFL Championship Game and was a member of the 1934 New York Giants team that won the second NFL Championship Game.

Badgro also played professional baseball as an outfielder for six years from 1928 to 1933, including two seasons in Major League Baseball for the St. Louis Browns (1929–1930). After his career as an athlete was over, Badgro served as a football coach for 14 years, including stints as the ends coach for Columbia (1939–1942) and Washington (19461953).

Red Badgro
Red Badgro
No. 17
Position:End
Personal information
Born:December 1, 1902
Orillia, Washington
Died:July 13, 1998 (aged 95)
Kent, Washington
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:191 lb (87 kg)
Career information
High school:Kent (WA)
College:USC
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:35
Receiving yards:560
Touchdowns:7
Player stats at NFL.com
Red Badgro
Outfielder
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
June 20, 1929, for the St. Louis Browns
Last MLB appearance
September 18, 1930, for the St. Louis Browns
MLB statistics
Batting average.257
Home Runs2
Runs batted in45
Teams

Early years

Badgro was born in 1902 in Orillia, Washington.[1] His father, Walter Badgro (1865–1940), was a farmer in Orillia.[2][3] He attended Kent High School where he was twice named captain of the basketball and baseball teams.[4] Badgro later recalled that his focus was on baseball and basketball in high school, noting that he only played "maybe three games of football in four years" of high school.[5]

University of Southern California

Badgro enrolled at the University of Southern California (USC) on a basketball scholarship. At USC, was a multi-sport star in baseball, basketball, and football.[6] Playing at the end position for the USC football team, he was selected by the United Press as a first-team player on the 1926 All-Pacific Coast football team. He was a forward for the USC basketball team and was named to the All-Pacific Coast Conference basketball team in 1927.[7] During the 1927 baseball season, he led USC with a .352 batting average, scored 25 runs in 21 games, and was named to the All-California baseball team.[8]

Professional athlete

Football

Badgro played 10 seasons of professional football. During the 1927 season, he appeared in 12 games for the New York Yankees.[1] The Yankees folded after the 1928 season, and Badgro opted to focus on professional baseball. He did not play professional football in 1929.

After playing Major League Baseball in 1929 and 1930, Badgro qualified as a free agent in professional football and signed with the New York Giants for $150 a game.[9] He gained his greatest acclaim as the starting left end for the Giants from 1930 to 1935. He was regarded as a sure-tackling defender and an effective blocker and talented receiver on defense. Giants coach Steve Owen said of Badgro: "He could block, tackle, and catch passes equally well. And he could do each with the best of them."[10] Highlights from Badgro's prime years include the following:

  • In 1930, he appeared in 17 games at left end, 14 as a starter, and was selected by the Green Bay Press-Gazette as a second-team end on the 1930 All-Pro Team.[1]
  • In 1931, he appeared in 13 games, 11 as a starter, and was selected by the NFL as a first-team end on the official 1931 All-Pro Team.[1]
  • In 1932, he appeared in 12 games, 11 as a starter.[1]
  • In 1933, he appeared in 12 games, 10 as a starter, and was selected by the Chicago Daily News as a second-team end on the 1933 All-Pro Team.[1] He helped lead the Giants to the 1933 NFL Championship Game where he scored the first touchdown in the first NFL Championship Game, a 29-yard touchdown on a pass from Harry Newman.[11]
  • In 1934, he appeared in 13 games, all as a starter, for the Giants team that won the 1934 NFL Championship Game. He was selected by the NFL and the Chicago Daily News as a first-team end on the 1934 All-Pro Team. He also led the NFL with 16 receptions.[1]
  • Playing against the Boston Redskins in 1935, Badgro blocked a punt, and teammate Les Corzine returned it for a go-ahead touchdown.[12]

Badgro concluded his playing career with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1936.[1]

Baseball

Badgro also played professional baseball. He played minor league ball in 1928 for the Tulsa Oilers in the Western League and the Muskogee Chiefs in the Western Association, compiling a .351 batting average in 513 at bats.[13] He also played for the Milwaukee Brewers of the American Association in 1929.[13]

In June 1929, Badgro made his major league debut with the St. Louis Browns. Over the 1929 and 1930 season, he appeared in 143 games, 80 of them as a right fielder and 13 as a center fielder. He compiled a .257 batting average in 382 major league at bats and appeared in his final major league game on September 18, 1930.[14]

Badgro continued to play in the minor leagues for several years, including stints with the Wichita Falls Spudders of the Texas League (1931–1932) and Seattle Indians of the Pacific Coast League (1933).[13]

Coaching career

In 1937, Badgro returned to USC to finish the credits he needed to graduate.[15] At the same time, he was a member of Howard Jones' football coaching staff at USC, responsible for working with USC's frosh players.[16]

In June 1938, Badgro was hired as the football coach at Ventura High School in Ventura, California.[17] He also coached football, baseball, and basketball for Ventura Junior College.[15]

In June 1939, he was hired as an assistant coach (responsible for ends) under Lou Little at Columbia.[18] He remained at Columbia through the 1942 season.[19]

In 1944, Badgro was employed in a Seattle war plant.

In February 1946, Badgro was hired as an assistant football coach at the University of Washington.[20] When Howard Odell took over as Washington's head coach, he retained Badgro as his ends coach.[21] Badgro was again retained when John Cherberg took over as head coach in 1953.[22] He resigned his coaching post at Washington in January 1954 in order to pursue private business in Kent, Washington.[23]

Family, later years, and honors

Badgro was married to Dorothea Taylor. After retiring from football, Badgro worked for the Department of Agriculture in the State of Washington.[15]

In 1967, Badgro was inducted into the Washington State Sports Hall of Fame.[24] Badgro was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1981 at age 78. He was the oldest person to be inducted into the Hall of Fame.[25]

Badgro died in July 1998 at age 95 in Kent, Washington. He had been hospitalized after a fall.[26] He was buried at Hillcrest Burial Park in Kent.[27]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Red Badgro". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 1, 2017.
  2. ^ Census entry for Walter Badgro and family. Son Morris H. age 7 born in Washington State. Census Place: Orillia, King, Washington; Roll: T624_1657; Page: 3B; Enumeration District: 0027; FHL microfilm: 1375670. Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line].
  3. ^ Census entry for Walter Badgro and family. Son Morris age 16 born in Washington State. Census Place: Orillia, King, Washington; Roll: T625_1925; Page: 7A; Enumeration District: 55. Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line].
  4. ^ "Morris "Red" Badgro". Greater Kent Historical Society. Retrieved October 1, 2017.
  5. ^ Richard Whittingham (1984). What a Game They Played: An Inside Look at the Golden Era of Pro Football. University of Nebraska Press. p. 46. ISBN 0803298196.
  6. ^ "'Red' Badgro Is All-Around Star". Santa Ana Register. March 18, 1927. p. 13 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "Badgro on All-Coast Basketball Team". Los Angeles Times. March 10, 1927. p. 37 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ "Morris Badgro Named On 3 All-Coast Teams". The Courier-Journal. May 15, 1927. p. 72 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ Whittingham, "What a Game They Played", pp. 47-48.
  10. ^ Richard Whittingham (1984). What a Game They Played: An Inside Look at the Golden Era of Pro Football. University of Nebraska Press. p. 45. ISBN 0803298196.
  11. ^ "1933 NFL Championship Game". Pro Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved October 1, 2017.
  12. ^ "Giants Defeat Redskins, 17-6, In Early Attack". Chicago Tribune. October 21, 1935. p. 23 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ a b c "Red Badgro Minor League Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 1, 2017.
  14. ^ "Red Badgro Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 1, 2017.
  15. ^ a b c Whittington, "What a Game They Played", p. 51.
  16. ^ "Troy Drills on Defense". Los Angeles Times. September 21, 1937. p. 30 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ "Badgro Will Coach At Ventura High". The San Bernardino County Sun. June 4, 1938. p. 15 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ "Badgro to Coach Ends at Columbia". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 23, 1939. p. 20 – via Newspapers.com.
  19. ^ "Stars Serving Under Uncle Sam". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. November 17, 1942. p. 19 – via Newspapers.com.
  20. ^ "Huskies Sign Red Badgro". Los Angeles Times. February 19, 1946. p. 11 – via Newspapers.com.
  21. ^ "Reggie Root and Red Badgro Named Husky Grid Aides". Los Angeles Times. January 17, 1948. p. 31 – via Newspapers.com.
  22. ^ "Huskies Name Back Coach". Corvallis Gazette-Times. March 14, 1953. p. 3 – via Newspapers.com.
  23. ^ "Huskies Lose Coach Badgro". Statesman Journal. January 29, 1954. p. 7 – via Newspapers.com.
  24. ^ "Sports Figures Honored". The Daily Chronicle. January 25, 1967. p. 10 – via Newspapers.com.
  25. ^ "Badgro to become Hall of Fame's oldest enshrinee". The Akron Beacon Journal. July 29, 1981. p. E1 – via Newspapers.com.
  26. ^ Frank Litsky (July 15, 1998). "Red Badgro, 95, Football Hall of Famer, Dies". The New York Times. Retrieved October 1, 2017.
  27. ^ "Morris Hiram "Red" Badgro". Find a Grave. Retrieved October 1, 2017.

External links

1902 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1902 throughout the world.

1926 All-Pacific Coast football team

The 1926 All-Pacific Coast football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific Coast teams for the 1926 college football season. The organizations selecting teams in 1926 included the Associated Press (AP) and the United Press (UP).

1929 St. Louis Browns season

The 1929 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 4th in the American League with a record of 79 wins and 73 losses.

1930 St. Louis Browns season

The 1930 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 6th in the American League with a record of 64 wins and 90 losses.

1930 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1930 throughout the world.

1931 All-Pro Team

The 1931 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1931 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the Green Bay Press-Gazette based on the returns of ballots sent to each club in the league as well as sports writers and officials, the United Press (UP), and Collyer's Eye (CE).Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. Four players were unanimously selected for the first team by all three selectors: Portsmouth Spartans quarterback Dutch Clark; Chicago Bears halfback Red Grange; Chicago Cardinals fullback Ernie Nevers; and New York Giants guard Butch Gibson.

1933 All-Pro Team

The 1933 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1933 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), the United Press, Red Grange for Collyer's Eye (CE), and the Green Bay Press-Gazette (GB).

1933 Chicago Bears season

The 1933 Chicago Bears season was their 14th regular season and 2nd postseason completed in the National Football League. The club posted a 10–2–1 record in the first year of George Halas's second tenure.

The Bears won their first six games while allowing only 33 points. In the middle of the season, the team struggled on the road, losing to Boston and New York and eking out a tie against the new Philadelphia Eagles franchise. After that, however, the Bears regained their winning ways, finishing the regular season with four consecutive wins, including two against Portsmouth, their foe in the indoor 1932 playoff game. The team won the newly established Western Division by 3½ games and hosted the first ever NFL championship game on a hot streak.

1933 NFL Championship Game

The 1933 National Football League Championship Game was the first scheduled championship game of the National Football League (NFL) since its founding in 1920. It was played on December 17 at Wrigley Field in Chicago, and the attendance was estimated at 25,000.The game was between the champions of the league's newly created divisions: the Chicago Bears (10–2–1) of the Western Division and the New York Giants (11–3) of the Eastern Division. Chicago gained the home field due to a better winning percentage in the regular season; after this year the home field alternated, with the Eastern Division champion hosting in even-numbered years and the Western in odd.

Chicago scored the winning touchdown with less than two minutes to go in the fourth quarter, capping a 23–21 victory. It was the Bears' second consecutive championship and third under founder and head coach George Halas.

1934 All-Pro Team

The 1934 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1934 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the Associated Press (AP), the United Press (UP), the Green Bay Press-Gazette (GB) based on the composite view of the coaches of 10 NFL teams and a half dozen NFL officials, Collyer's Eye (CE), and the Chicago Daily News (CDN).Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. Five players were selected as first-team All-Pro players by all five selectors: Detroit Lions quarterback Dutch Clark; Chicago Bears halfback Beattie Feathers; Chicago Bears fullback Bronko Nagurski; Chicago Bears end Bill Hewitt; and New York Giants center Mel Hein.

1936 Brooklyn Dodgers (NFL) season

The 1936 Brooklyn Dodgers season was their seventh in the league. The team failed to improve on their previous season's output of 5–6–1, winning only three games. They failed to qualify for the playoffs for the fifth consecutive season.

Brooklyn Dodgers (NFL)

The Brooklyn Dodgers were an American football team that played in the National Football League from 1930 to 1943, and in 1944 as the Brooklyn Tigers. The team played its home games at Ebbets Field of the baseball National League's team, the Brooklyn Dodgers. In 1945, because of financial difficulties and the increasing scarcity of major league-level players because of the war-time defense requirements at the height of World War II, the team was merged with the Boston Yanks and were known as the Yanks for that season.

This old NFL franchise was not related to the earlier (second incarnation) American Football League II with a franchise that played as the Brooklyn Tigers for the first half of the 1936 season before moving to Rochester, New York and playing as the Rochester Tigers. Another NFL team that played in the Brooklyn borough was the Brooklyn Lions (which became the Brooklyn Horsemen after merging with a team from an earlier first incarnation AFL of the same name) in 1926.

In 1946, co-owner and partner Dan Topping (1912–1974) pulled the Tigers team out of the old NFL and placed it in the newly established rival professional league – the All-America Football Conference, which shortly lasted until 1949 until several stronger teams from the AAFC merged with and entered a reorganized NFL in 1950. It lasted until 1970 with the NFL-AFL (third) merger following the establishment of the first "Super Bowl" inter-league national championship game three years before with the old NFL champions playing the victors of the latest rival fourth incarnation of the American Football League IV, formed in 1960 (now the American Football Conference (AFC).

John Matthew Cannella

John Matthew Cannella (February 8, 1908 – October 30, 1996) was a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. He previously played as an offensive lineman in the National Football League for the New York Giants in the 1930s.

Kent-Meridian High School

Kent-Meridian High School is a high school located in Kent, Washington, United States, and part of the Kent School District. Kent-Meridian is one of four high schools in the Kent School District. It serves students in grades nine through twelve who live mainly in the south region of the district. Its principal is David Radford.

List of National Football League annual receptions leaders

This is a list of National Football League players who have led the regular season in receptions each year.

List of New York Yankees (NFL) players

This is a list of American football players who have played for the New York Yankees (NFL) in the National Football League (NFL) as well as those who played for the franchise during their time in the first American Football League. It includes players that have played at least one match in the AFLI or NFL regular season. The Yankees franchise was founded in 1926 and lasted until 1928.

List of athletes who played in Major League Baseball and the National Football League

Fewer than 70 athletes are known to have played in both Major League Baseball (MLB) and the National Football League (NFL). This includes two Heisman Trophy winners (Vic Janowicz and Bo Jackson) and seven members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame (Red Badgro, Paddy Driscoll, George Halas, Ernie Nevers, Ace Parker, Jim Thorpe, and Deion Sanders). However, none of the players on the list has been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

In 1920, the inaugural season of the NFL, 11 veterans of MLB (including George Halas and Jim Thorpe) became the first athletes to accomplish the feat. Since 1970, only seven athletes have done so, including Bo Jackson and Deion Sanders. Jackson was the first athlete to be selected as an All-Star in both MLB and the NFL. Sanders holds the longevity record, having appeared in 641 MLB games and 189 NFL games.

Orillia, Washington

Orillia, Washington was a former community, southwest of Renton in the Green River Valley of King County in the U.S. state of Washington. At one time, it had a schoolhouse. Today it lies on the border between the cities of Kent, Tukwila and Renton.

A post office called Orillia was established in 1887, and remained in operation until 1964. The community was named after Orillia, Ontario, Canada, the native home of an early settler. In 1959, the cities of Kent and Renton annexed the community.Red Badgro was born in Orillia.

Syracuse Braves

The Syracuse Braves were a professional American football team that competed in the second American Football League in 1936 and 1937. Coached by Don Irwin and Red Badgro, the Braves played in Municipal Stadium, which had a capacity of only about 10,000 people. The team was not a strong draw as it lost its first five games, prompting a search for a new home, including Providence, Rhode Island, before settling upon a move to Rochester.On October 25, 1936, a 16–7 victory over the Boston Shamrocks in Fenway Park provided the franchise its first win in its last game as the Syracuse Braves. The following week would see the newly renamed Rochester Braves face the Shamrocks in a rematch in Silver Stadium. The second half was delayed 40 minutes by Braves players demanding back pay. The game was finished; the Braves lost, 13–0; the franchise folded immediately afterward. Coach Don Irwin joined the New York Yankees, while co-coach Red Badgro returned to the NFL's Brooklyn Dodgers to finish the season.Two weeks later, another AFL team made the trek to Silver Stadium to call it home: the Brooklyn Tigers, having spent most of the 1936 season as a traveling team, became Rochester's third professional football team and continued as the Rochester Tigers in 1937.

* 0–1 as Rochester Braves in 1936

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