Red Ames

Leon Kessling "Red" Ames (August 2, 1882 – October 8, 1936) was an American pitcher in Major League Baseball for the New York Giants, Cincinnati Reds, St. Louis Cardinals, and Philadelphia Phillies.

Red Ames
Red Ames
Pitcher
Born: August 2, 1882
Warren, Ohio
Died: October 8, 1936 (aged 54)
Warren, Ohio
Batted: Both Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 14, 1903, for the New York Giants
Last MLB appearance
September 15, 1919, for the Philadelphia Phillies
MLB statistics
Win–loss record183-167
Earned run average2.63
Strikeouts1702
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Major league career

Born in Warren, Ohio, Ames was a third or fourth starter for the New York Giants during their early period of dominance under John McGraw. He made his debut on September 14, 1903, pitching an abbreviated five-inning no-hitter against the Cardinals, but was not in the rotation full-time until 1905, when his 22 wins and 2.74 ERA helped the Giants to their first twentieth-century world championship. This was by far his best season; although the Giants were perennial contenders during this time, injury and wildness kept him from becoming a star even though he was the Opening Day pitcher three years running. A career ERA of 2.63 ties him with Cy Young.

He pitched in three World Series with the Giants (1905, 1911, 1912), but appeared almost entirely in relief in the fall classic, starting only once, the last game in 1911, which he lost decisively to the world champion Philadelphia Athletics. He was traded to the Reds in 1913, and never again approached his earlier success with the Giants.

Ames' greatest distinction was being one of the wildest pitchers in history with a curveball charitably described as "dramatic." Other of his notable accomplishments are leading the National League in saves with 6 in 1914 and 8 in 1916, and in strikeouts per 9 innings pitched in 1905 (6.78), 1906 (6.90) and 1907 (5.63).

On Opening Day, April 15, 1909, he achieved the feat of losing a no-hitter in a game in which he did not give up a hit until the 10th inning or a run until the 13th, but received credit for nine no-hit innings at a moment, but later this was negated because you must start and finish the game or another pitcher without allowing a hit.

Ames, Lee Meadows and Bill Doak were involved in a car accident on April 16, 1919, when the car they were in crashed into a street car in St. Louis. Initial reports indicated that none were seriously injured. [1]

Later years

After leaving the majors, he pitched in the minors for three more years and managed briefly in the minors in 1923. His son, Red Ames Jr, played in the minor leagues for several years.

See also

References

  1. ^ "LEE MEADOWS (left)..." New York Tribune. April 17, 1919. Retrieved April 13, 2019.

External links

1903 New York Giants season

The 1903 New York Giants season was the franchise's 21st season. The team finished in second place in the National League with an 84–55 record, 6.5 games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1904 New York Giants season

The 1904 New York Giants season was the 22nd season in franchise history. They led the National League in both runs scored and fewest runs allowed, on their way to 106 wins and the pennant.

The first modern World Series had been played the previous year, but manager John McGraw and owner John T. Brush refused to play the American League champion Boston Americans in a 1904 World Series. They would change their position the following year.

1905 New York Giants season

The 1905 New York Giants season was the franchise's 23rd season, and the team won their second consecutive National League pennant. They beat the Philadelphia Athletics in the World Series.

1906 New York Giants season

The 1906 New York Giants season was the franchise's 24th season. The team finished in second place in the National League with a 96-56 record, 20 games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1907 New York Giants season

The 1907 New York Giants season was the franchise's 25th season. The team finished in fourth place in the National League with an 82-71 record, 25½ games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1909 New York Giants season

The 1909 New York Giants season was the franchise's 27th season. The team finished in third place in the National League with a 92–61 record, 18½ games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1910 New York Giants season

The 1910 New York Giants season was the franchise's 28th season. The team finished in second place in the National League with a 91-63 record, 13 games behind the Chicago Cubs.

The Giants offense scored the most runs in the NL. Fred Snodgrass had his breakthrough season, finishing fourth in the batting race and also leading the team in on-base percentage and OPS.

Their pitching staff was once again led by Hall of Famer Christy Mathewson, who won a league-best 27 games. His 1.89 earned run average ranked third.

1911 New York Giants season

The 1911 New York Giants season was the franchise's 29th season. It involved the Giants winning their first of three consecutive National League pennants. They were beaten by the Philadelphia Athletics in the World Series.

Led by manager John McGraw, the Giants won the NL by 7½ games. On the offensive side, they finished second in total runs scored. On the defensive side, they allowed the fewest. Hall of Famer Christy Mathewson led the league in ERA, and Rube Marquard had the most strikeouts.

Taken together with the 1912 and 1913 pennant winners, this team is considered one of the greatest of all-time.

1912 New York Giants season

The 1912 New York Giants season was the franchise's 30th season. It involved the Giants winning the National League pennant. They were beaten by the Boston Red Sox in the World Series. Fred Snodgrass took most of the blame, as he dropped a fly ball in the deciding contest.Led by manager John McGraw, the Giants dominated the NL, opening the season 54-11 and building a 16 1/2-game lead by July 3. On the offensive side, they easily led the league in runs scored. Larry Doyle finished fourth in the batting race and was voted league MVP. Chief Meyers had one of the greatest offensive seasons ever for a catcher and was second in batting.They had arguably the best pitching staff, too. Jeff Tesreau, Hall of Famer Christy Mathewson, and Red Ames finished 1–2–5 in league ERA. Rube Marquard's 18-game winning streak was the top story in baseball.

Taken together with the 1911 and 1913 pennant winners, this team is considered one of the greatest of all-time. It also makes up a good portion of the 1966 book The Glory of Their Times, as Marquard, Meyers, and Snodgrass were three of the players interviewed.

1913 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1913 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the National League with a record of 64–89, 37 ½ games behind the New York Giants.

1914 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1914 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. It consisted of the Cincinnati Reds attempting to win the National League, but finishing in 8th place and last in the league.

1915 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1915 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the National League with a record of 71–83, 20 games behind the Philadelphia Phillies.

1915 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1915 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 34th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 24th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 72–81 during the season and finished 6th in the National League. The legendary Rogers Hornsby made his National League debut on September 10.

1916 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1916 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 35th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 25th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 60–93 during the season and finished tied for seventh and last in the National League.

Rogers Hornsby became a regular in the Cardinals lineup starting in 1916. Hornsby played at least one game at each infield position. He immediately established himself as one of the league's leading hitters, finishing the 1916 season fourth in the batting race with a .313 average, and smacking 15 triples, one short of the league's lead.

1917 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1917 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 36th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 26th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 82–70 during the season and finished 3rd in the National League.

1918 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1918 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 37th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 27th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 51–78 during the season and finished 8th in the National League. It would be the last time the Cardinals would finish in last place until 1990, when they finished sixth in the National League East.

1919 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1919 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1919 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1919 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 38th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 28th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 54–83 during the season and finished 7th in the National League.

List of New York Giants Opening Day starting pitchers

The New York Giants were a Major League Baseball team that played in Manhattan, New York until moving to San Francisco in 1958. From 1883 until their move to San Francisco, they played their home games at the Polo Grounds. They played in the National League. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. The Giants used 33 different Opening Day starting pitchers in their 75 seasons they played in New York. The Giants won 39 of those games against 35 losses in those Opening Day starts. They also played one tie game.Carl Hubbell had the most Opening Day starts for the New York Giants with six between 1929 and 1942. Mickey Welch, Amos Rusie and Larry Jansen each had five Opening Day starts for the team. Christy Mathewson, Red Ames, Jeff Tesreau and Bill Voiselle all had four Opening Day starts apiece for the Giants. Ed Doheny and Johnny Antonelli each had three Opening Day starts for the New York Giants and Antonelli also had an Opening Day start for the San Francisco Giants in 1959, giving him a total of four Opening Day starts for the franchise. Antonelli is the only player to have an Opening Day start for both the New York and San Francisco Giants.Other pitchers who had multiple Opening Day starts for the New York Giants were Hal Schumacher with three such starts, and Joe McGinnity, Rube Marquard, Jesse Barnes, Art Nehf, Virgil Barnes, Bill Walker and Sal Maglie with two apiece. Seven Hall of Fame pitchers made Opening Day starts for the New York Giants — Welch, Tim Keefe, Rusie, Mathewson, McGinnity, Marquard and Hubbell.

The New York Giants won the modern World Series five times, in 1905, 1921, 1922, 1933 and 1954. Their Opening Day starting pitchers in those years were Joe McGinnity in 1905, [Phil Douglas (baseball)|Phil Douglas]] in 1921, Art Nehf in 1922, Carl Hubbell in 1933 and Sal Maglie in 1954. In 1904, the Giants won the National League championship but no World Series was played. Christy Mathewson was the Giants' Opening Day starting pitcher that season. The Giants also won the 19th century World Series twice, in 1888 and 1889. Cannonball Titcomb and Mickey Welch were the Giants Opening Day starting pitchers in 1888 and 1889, respectively.

Jesse and Virgil Barnes, who each made two Opening Day starts for the New York Giants, were brothers.

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