Reading Borough Council

Reading Borough Council is the local authority for the Borough of Reading in the English county of Berkshire. It is a unitary authority, having the powers of a non-metropolitan county and district council combined. Berkshire is purely a ceremonial county, with no administrative responsibilities.

Reading Borough Council has adopted the committee system of governance and the current leader of the council is Councillor Jo Lovelock of the Labour Party. The largely ceremonial post of mayor is held by Cllr Debs Edwards.[1]

The area covered by the Borough of Reading is one definition of the town of Reading. However, in common usage, the town often encompasses suburbs that lie beyond the borough boundary, in the adjoining local authority areas of Wokingham, West Berkshire and South Oxfordshire. These suburbs are outside the control of Reading Borough Council.

Reading Borough Council
Third of council elected three years out of four
Arms of Reading Borough Council
Coat of arms
Reading Borough Council logo
Council logo
Type
Type
History
Founded1 April 1974
Preceded byThe Council of the Royal County of Berkshire Berkshire County Council
Leadership
Mayor of Reading
Cllr Debs Edwards[1], Labour
Leader of the Council
Cllr Jo Lovelock[1], Labour
since 25 May 2011
Chief executive
Peter Sloman
since 28 March 2017
Structure
Seats46 councillors
Reading Borough Council composition
Political groups
Administration
     Labour Party (30)
Other parties
     Conservative Party (12)
     Green Party (3)
     Liberal Democrats (1)
Length of term
4 years
Elections
Plurality-at-large
Last election
2015 (one third of councillors)
2016 (one third of councillors)
2018 (one third of councillors)
Next election
2019 (one third of councillors)
2020 (one third of councillors)
2022 (one third of councillors)
Motto
A Deo et Regina
Meeting place
Reading Civic Centre
Website
www.reading.gov.uk

Wards

Reading's councillors are elected by 16 wards:[1]

Of these wards, 15 are represented by three councillors each, with one councillor elected in each of three years out of four. The exception is Mapledurham ward, which has a single councillor elected in one year out of four.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Councillors Poster 2018-19" (PDF). Reading Borough Council. Retrieved 25 June 2018.

External links

2008 Reading Borough Council election

The 2008 Reading Borough Council election to the Reading Borough Council resulted in gains for the Conservatives and the Social Democrats and losses for the Labour party.

2010 Reading Borough Council election

Elections to Reading Borough Council took place on 6 May 2010 under the backdrop of the 2010 general election, with 15 council seats up for election. The Labour Party continued to lose seats, losing Katesgrove ward to the Liberal Democrats and Park ward to the Green Party. The Conservatives held all their seats apart from Minster ward which was a surprise gain by Labour.

The election resulted in Reading Borough Council being left in no overall control. Shortly after the election the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats announced they would form a coalition to govern locally, ending over two decades of Labour control.

2018 Reading Borough Council election

The 2018 Reading Borough Council election's took place on 3 May 2018 to elect members of Reading Borough Council. There were three casual vacancies in Kentwood, Katesgrove and Church wards due to the early retirement of Councillors. The Labour Party held on to control of Reading Borough Council seeing their vote increase in seats across the Reading East constituency but suffered set backs in the marginal seat of Kentwood where The Conservative Party gained a seat. The Conservatives also succeed in gaining Tilehurst ward from the Liberal Democrats reducing the Liberal Democrats to one remaining Councillor. The election was held on the same day as other local elections.

2019 Reading Borough Council election

The 2019 Reading Borough Council election took place on 2 May 2019 to elect members in 15 wards of Reading Borough Council. There was also a casual vacancy in Thames ward. The Labour Party held control of the council.

The Liberal Democrats and the The Green Party succeeded in making significant increases in their vote across the borough, the Liberal Democrats gaining Tilehurst from the Conservatives and The Green Party gaining Redlands Ward from The Labour Party. The only gain for either of the two major parties was in Caversham where Labour gained a seat from the Conservatives. The election was held on the same day as other local elections.

Battle (Reading ward)

Battle is an electoral ward of the Borough of Reading, in the English county of Berkshire. It is situated to the west of the town centre, south of the River Thames, and is bordered by Kentwood, Mapledurham, Thames, Caversham, Abbey, Minster, Southcote and Norcot wards.As with all wards, apart from smaller Mapledurham, it elects three councillors to Reading Borough Council. Elections since 2004 are held by thirds, with elections in three years out of four.

In the 2011, 2012 and 2014 a Labour Party candidate won each election.

These Councillors are currently, in order of election: Matt Rodda, Gul Khan and Sarah Hacker.The area is ethnically diverse and has significant Afro-Caribbean and South Asian populations.

Caversham (Reading ward)

Caversham is an electoral ward of the Borough of Reading, in the English county of Berkshire. It is to the north of the town centre, in the suburb of Caversham to the north of the River Thames, and is bordered by Thames, Peppard and Abbey wards.As with all wards, apart from smaller Mapledurham, it elects three councillors to Reading Borough Council. Elections since 2004 are held by thirds, with elections in three years out of four.

In the 2011 the Conservative Party won followed by a Labour Party or Labour and Co-operative Party candidate winning in 2012 and 2014

These Councillors are currently, in order of election: Rachael Chrisp (Lab), Claire McDonald (Con) and Richard Davies (Lab and Coop).

Church (Reading ward)

Church is an electoral ward of the Borough of Reading, in the English county of Berkshire. It is covers an area south and south-east of the town centre, and is bordered by Katesgrove, Park, Redlands and Whitley wards.As with all wards, apart from smaller Mapledurham, it elects three councillors to Reading Borough Council. Elections since 2004 are held by thirds, with elections in three years out of four.

In the 2011, 2012 and 2014 a Labour Party candidate won each election.

These Councillors are currently, in order of election: Paul Woodward, Eileen McElligott and Ashley Pearce.

Park (Reading ward)

Park is an electoral ward of the Borough of Reading, in the English county of Berkshire. It is the far eastern ward and is bordered to its west by Abbey, Church and Redlands wards. On the north, east and south it is bordered by the civil parish of Earley in the Borough of Wokingham.As with all wards, apart from smaller Mapledurham, it elects three councillors to Reading Borough Council. Elections since 2004 are held by thirds, with elections in three years out of four.

In the 2011, 2012 and 2014 a Green Party candidate won each election.

Peppard (Reading ward)

Peppard is an electoral ward of the Borough of Reading, in the English county of Berkshire.

Reading, Berkshire

Reading ( (listen) RED-ing) is a large, historic university and minster town in Berkshire, England, of which it is now the county town. It is in the Thames Valley at the confluence of the River Thames and River Kennet, and on both the Great Western Main Line railway and the M4 motorway. Reading is 70 miles (110 km) east of Bristol, 24 miles (39 km) south of Oxford, 40 miles (64 km) west of London, 14 miles (23 km) north of Basingstoke, 12 miles (19 km) south-west of Maidenhead and 15 miles (24 km) east of Newbury as the crow flies.

The first evidence for Reading as a town dates from the 8th century. It was an important trading and ecclesiastical centre in the medieval period, as the site of Reading Abbey, one of the largest and richest monasteries of medieval England with strong royal connections, of which the 12th-century abbey gateway and significant ancient ruins remain. By 1525, Reading was the largest town in Berkshire, and tax returns show that Reading was the 10th largest town in England when measured by taxable wealth. The medieval town was seriously affected by the English Civil War, with a major siege and loss of trade, and played a pivotal role in the Revolution of 1688, with that revolution's only significant military action fought on the streets of the town. The 18th century saw the beginning of a major iron works in the town and the growth of the brewing trade for which Reading was to become famous. The 19th century saw the coming of the Great Western Railway and the development of the town's brewing, baking and seed growing businesses. During that period, the town grew rapidly as a manufacturing centre.

Today, Reading is a major commercial centre, with involvement in information technology and insurance, and, despite its proximity to London, has a net inward commuter flow. It is ranked the UK's top economic area for economic success and wellbeing, according to factors such as employment, health, income and skills. Reading is also a major regional retail centre serving a large area of the Thames Valley, and is home to the University of Reading. Every year it hosts the Reading Festival, one of England's biggest music festivals. Sporting teams based in Reading include Reading Football Club, Reading City F.C. and London Irish rugby union team, and over 15,000 runners annually compete in the Reading Half Marathon.

In the 2011 census, the urban area around Reading had an estimated population of 318,014. The borough is represented in Parliament by two members, and has been continuously represented there since 1295. For ceremonial purposes the town is in the county of Berkshire and has served as its county town since 1867, previously sharing this status with Abingdon-on-Thames.

Reading Borough Council elections

Reading is a unitary authority in Berkshire, England. Until 1 April 1998 it was a non-metropolitan district.

Reading Green Park railway station

Reading Green Park railway station is a planned railway station in Reading, Berkshire, England. The station is intended to serve the proposed Green Park Village residential development, the existing Green Park Business Park and the Madejski Stadium. It is planned to be on the Reading to Basingstoke Line, south of Southcote Junction. The station has planning permission from Reading Borough Council, is awaiting planning permission from West Berkshire Council and is intended to open in March 2020. On 28 July 2017, the Government gave funding to the station.

Royal Berkshire Fire and Rescue Service

The Royal Berkshire Fire and Rescue Service is a statutory fire and rescue service covering the area of the ceremonial county of Berkshire in England. The fire service was formerly administered by Berkshire County Council, but when that was abolished the service became the responsibility of the Royal Berkshire Fire Authority, made up of representatives from the six unitary authorities of Bracknell Forest Borough Council, Reading Borough Council, Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead, Slough Borough Council, West Berkshire Council, and Wokingham Borough Council.

The service's headquarters are located at Newsham Court, Pincents Kiln, in the Reading suburb of Calcot. It operates from 18 fire stations across Berkshire.

Thames (Reading ward)

Thames is an electoral ward of the Borough of Reading, in the English county of Berkshire. It is one of four wards in Caversham which describes the area in the borough on the north side of the River Thames and is immediately north of Reading town centre. It is bordered by Caversham ward and two wards in the direction of neighbouring villages, named after them, but not including them: Peppard and Mapledurham, (straddling Peppard and Mapledurham roads). Across the river is Abbey ward.As with all wards, apart from smaller Mapledurham, it elects three councillors to Reading Borough Council. Elections since 2004 are held by thirds, with elections in three years out of four.

Districts
Councils
Local elections
Local authorities in Berkshire

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