Raymond F. Jones

Raymond Fisher Jones (15 November 1915 – 24 January 1994) was an American science fiction author. He is best known for his 1952 novel This Island Earth, which was adapted into the eponymous 1955 film.

Raymond Fisher Jones
BornNovember 15, 1915
DiedJanuary 24, 1994 (aged 78)
Sandy, Utah, USA
Amazing stories 195108
Jones's novella "The Wrong Side of Paradise" was the cover story in the August 1951 issue of Amazing Stories.
Amazing stories 196212
Jones's novelette "Stay Off the Moon!" was the cover story on the December 1962 issue of Amazing Stories.

Personal life

Jones was born at Salt Lake City, Utah, and was a member of the church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from birth.[1] He died at Sandy, Utah, in 1994.[2]

Career

Most of Jones' short fiction was published during the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, in magazines such as Thrilling Wonder Stories, Astounding Stories, and Galaxy. His sixteen novels were published between 1951 and 1978.[3]

His short story "Rat Race", first published in the April 1966 issue of Analog Science Fiction and Fact, was nominated for a Hugo Award.[4] In 1996, "Correspondence Course", first published in the April 1945 edition of Astounding Stories, was nominated for a Retro Hugo award for best short story.[5] Another short story, "The Alien Machine", first published in the June 1949 edition of Thrilling Wonder Stories, was later combined with two other short stories, "The Shroud of Secrecy" and "The Greater Conflict", and expanded into the novel This Island Earth,[6] upon which the movie of the same name was based.

Jones also wrote the story upon which a 1952 Tales of Tomorrow television program episode, titled "The Children's Room", was based.[7]

Jones short story, "Tools of the Trade", that appeared in the November 1950 issue of Astounding, was the first story dealing with 3D printing, although he called it "Molecular Spray" at the time.

Bibliography

Novels and collections
  • The Alien (1951), OCLC 1872654
  • Renaissance (1951), OCLC 1601340
  • The Toymaker (1951), OCLC 3437888
  • Son of the Stars (1952), OCLC 1601327
  • This Island Earth (1952), OCLC 6122497
  • Planet of Light (1953), OCLC 1137088
  • The Secret People (1956), OCLC 6362798
  • The Year When Stardust Fell (1958), OCLC 1137133
  • The Cybernetic Brains (1962), OCLC 1915415
  • The Non-Statistical Man (1964), OCLC 1881957
  • Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1965), OCLC 5871064
  • Syn (1969), OCLC 6083296
Short stories
  • "Test of the Gods", Astounding Science Fiction (September, 1941)
  • "The Children's Room" (1942)
  • "Starting Point" (1942)
  • "Swimming Lesson" (1943)
  • "Pacer" (1943)
  • "Fifty Million Monkeysv (1943)
  • "Utility" (1944) [as by David Anderson]
  • Renaissance series (1944)
  • "Deadly Host" (1945)
  • "Correspondence Course" (1945)
  • "Black Market" (1946)
  • "Forecast" (1946)
  • "The Cat and the King" (1946)
  • "The Toymaker" (1946)
  • "The Seven Jewels of Chamar" (1946)
  • "Pete Can Fix It" (1947)
  • "The Martian Circe" (1947)
  • "The Model Shop" (1947)
  • "The Person from Porlock" (1947)
  • "The Alien Machine, featuring Cal Meacham" (1949)
  • "Production Test" (1949)
  • "The Shroud of Secrecy, featuring Cal Meacham" (1949)
  • "Outpost Infinity" (1950)
  • "The Greater Conflict, featuring Cal Meacham" (1950)
  • "Regulations Provide" (1950)
  • "Encroachment" (1950)
  • "Portrait of Narcissus" (1950)
  • "Sunday is Three Thousand Years Away" (1950)
  • "The Cybernetic Brains" (1950)
  • "Discontinuity" (1950)
  • "Tools of the Trade" (1950)
  • "A Stone and a Spear" (1950)
  • "Divided We Fall. . ." (1950)
  • "I Tell You Three Times" (1951)
  • "... As Others See Us" (1951)
  • "Alarm Reaction" (1951)
  • "The Wrong Side of Paradise" (1951)
  • "Seed" (1951)
  • "The Farthest Horizon" (1952)
  • "Collision" (1952)
  • "Doomsday's Color-Press" (1952)
  • "Noise Level" (1952)
  • "Canterbury April" (1952)
  • "The Moon Is Death" (1953)
  • "Intermission Timev (1953)
  • "Trade Secret" (1953)
  • "The Colonists" (1954)
  • "The Unlearned" (1954)
  • "The School" (1954)
  • "The Gift of the Gods" (1955)
  • "Cubs of the Wolf" (1955)
  • "Human Error" (1956)
  • "Academy for Pioneers" (1956)
  • "The Deviates" (1956)
  • "The Non-Statistical Man" (1956)
  • "The Thinking Machine" (1956)
  • "A Matter of Culture" (1956)
  • "The Gardener" (1957)
  • "The Star Dream" (1957)
  • "The Strad Effect" (1958)
  • "The Memory of Mars" (1961)
  • "The Great Gray Plague" (1962)
  • "Stay Off the Moon!" (1962)
  • "Rider in the Sky" (1964)
  • "Rat Race" (1966)
  • "Subway to the Stars" (1968)
  • "The Laughing Lion" (1973)
  • "Pet" (1973)
  • "The Lights of Mars" (1973)
  • "A Bowl of Biskies Makes a Growing Boy" (1973)
  • "The Lions of Rome" (1973)
  • "Time Brother" (1973)
  • "Reflection of a Star" (1974)
  • "Flauna" (1974)
  • "The Touch of Your Hand" (1974)
  • "Death Eternal" (1978)
  • "Weeping May Tarry" (1978, written with Lester del Rey)

Gutenberg Project

Nine[8] of his books have been made available for free by the Gutenberg Project, despite their recent publication, because they fell into the public domain when the original copyright was not renewed: The Great Gray Plague, The Memory of Mars, Cubs of the Wolf, The Colonists, The Year When Stardust Fell, The Unlearned, The Alien, and Human Error, plus the Japanese book 火星の記憶.

References

  1. ^ "Meet the author". The Unofficial Raymond F. Jones Website.
  2. ^ "Raymond Fisher Jones (1915 - 1994) - Find A Grave Memorial". Find A Grave.
  3. ^ "Raymond F. Jones - Chronological Bibliography". The Internet Speculative Fiction Database.
  4. ^ "1967 Hugo Awards". The Hugo Awards Website.
  5. ^ "1946 Retro Hugo Awards". The Hugo Awards Website.
  6. ^ "Bibliography: This Island Earth". The Internet Speculative Fiction Database.
  7. ^ ""Tales of Tomorrow" The Children's Room (TV episode 1952) - IMDb". IMDb.
  8. ^ Project Gutenberg

External links

Avalon Books

Avalon Books was a small New York-based book publishing imprint active from 1950 through 2012, established by Thomas Bouregy. Avalon was an important science fiction imprint in the 1950s and 60s; later its specialty was mystery and romance books. The imprint was owned by Thomas Bouregy & Co., Inc.. It remained a family firm, with Thomas's daughter Ellen Bouregy Mickelsen taking over as publisher in 1995.On June 4, 2012 it was announced that Amazon.com had purchased the imprint and its back-list of about 3,000 titles. Amazon said it would publish the books through the various imprints of Amazon Publishing.

Divided We Fall

Divided We Fall may refer to:

"United we stand, divided we fall", a motto"Divided We Fall" (short story), by Raymond F. Jones

Divided We Fall (film), a 2000 Czech film directed by Jan Hřebejk

Divided We Fall (album), a 2016 album by Flaw

A 2005 episode of Justice League Unlimited

Divided We Fall (short story)

". . . Divided We Fall" is a short story by Raymond F. Jones, originally published in Amazing Stories in 1950. It was rewritten as a novel called Syn.

Galaxy Science Fiction Novels

Galaxy novels, sometimes titled Galaxy Science Fiction Novels, were a series of mostly reprint American science fiction novels published between 1950 and 1961.

The series was started by H.L. Gold, the editor of Galaxy Science Fiction, in 1950 as a companion to the main Galaxy magazine. There was one (often abridged) novel per issue, which appeared in digest size format, which made the books in the series look like digest magazines.

In 1959, after 35 issues, the series was sold to Beacon Books, which changed the format to mass-market (small size) paperback and introduced its own numbering scheme, continuing the series for another 11 issues. They also had the contents of some books revised to add mild sexual content and changed their titles accordingly.

Interocitor

An interocitor is a fictional multi-functional device that first appeared in the 1949 story "The Alien Machine", which became the beginning four chapters of the 1952 novel This Island Earth, which in turn was made into the 1955 science fiction film This Island Earth. The device arrives in kit form as an intelligence test for scientists who might prove helpful to an alien race.

Laser Books

Laser Books was a line of 58 paperback science fiction (SF) novels published from 1975 to 1977 by Canadian romance powerhouse Harlequin Books. Laser published three titles per month, available by subscription as well as in stores. The books were limited to 50,000-60,000 words. They were numbered as a series, though each was a standalone novel. All the covers were painted by Hugo Award winning artist Kelly Freas.

List of science fiction novels

This is a list of science fiction novels, novel series, and collections of linked short stories. It includes modern novels, as well as novels written before the term "science fiction" was in common use. This list includes novels not marketed as SF but still considered to be substantially science fiction in content by some critics, such as Nineteen Eighty Four. As such, it is an inclusive list, not an exclusive list based on other factors such as level of notability or literary quality. Books are listed in alphabetical order by title, ignoring the leading articles "A", "An", and "The". Novel series are alphabetical by author-designated name or, if there is none, the title of the first novel in the series or some other reasonable designation.

Planet of Light

Planet of Light is a science fiction novel by American writer Raymond F. Jones, first published in 1953 by the John C. Winston Co. as part of its 35-book set of juvenile novels. Written as a sequel to Son of the Stars, the story follows Ron Barron and his family as they are taken to a planet in the Great Galaxy of Andromeda to participate in a meeting of an intergalactic analogue of the United Nations. They face the question if Earth is ready to join an intergalactic society.

This is one of the thirty-five juvenile novels that comprise the Winston Science Fiction set, which were published in the 1950s for a readership of teen-aged boys. The typical protagonist in these books, like Ron Barron, was a boy in his late teens who was proficient in the art of electronics, a hobby that was easily available to the readers.

Raymond Jones

Raymond or Ray Jones may refer to:

Ray W. Jones (1855–1919), Lieutenant Governor of Minnesota

Ray Jones (Australian politician) (1909–1967), Australian state politician

Ray Jones (Kentucky politician) (born 1969), member of the Kentucky Senate

Raymond Jones (composer), best known for his work on Doctor Who

Raymond F. Jones (1915–1994), American science fiction author

Raymond Ray-Jones (1886–1942), artist

Wizz Jones (Raymond Ronald Jones, born 1939), English musician

Raymond Jones (architect) (born 1925), Australian architect and footballer

Ray Jones (American football) (born 1947), American football player

Raymond Jones (boxer) (1903–?), Australian boxer

Raymond Jones (cricketer) (born 1958), New Zealand cricketer

Ray Jones (cyclist) (1918–1990), English road cyclist

Ray Jones (footballer, born 1921) (1921–2008), Australian rules footballer for South Melbourne

Ray Jones (footballer, born 1924), Australian rules footballer for Geelong

Ray Jones (footballer, born 1944) (1944–2007), English footballer who played for Chester City

Ray Jones (footballer, born 1988) (1988–2007), English footballer who played for QPR

Ray Jones (politician) (1926–2000), Australian politician

Ad hoc pseudonym of Alistair Taylor

Renaissance (novel)

Renaissance is a science fiction novel by American writer Raymond F. Jones. The novel was originally serialized in the magazine Astounding in 1944. It was published in 1951 by Gnome Press in an edition of 4,000 copies. It was reprinted by Pyramid Books in 1963 and subsequently under the title Man of Two Worlds.

Shasta Publishers

Shasta Publishers was a science fiction and fantasy small press specialty publishing house founded in 1947 by Erle Melvin Korshak, T. E. Dikty, and Mark Reinsberg, who were all science fiction fans from the Chicago area. The name of the press was suggested by Reinsberg in remembrance of a summer job that he and Korshak had held at Mount Shasta.

Son of the Stars

Son of the Stars is a science fiction novel by American writer by Raymond F. Jones, first published in the United States in 1952 by The John C. Winston Company.

This is one of the thirty-five juvenile novels that comprise the Winston Science Fiction set, which novels were published in the 1950s for a readership of teen-aged boys. The typical protagonist in these books was a boy in his late teens who was proficient in the art of electronics, a hobby that was easily available to the readers. In this story Ron Barron is typical in having a ham radio set up in a shed in the back yard of his parents' house.

The Toymaker

The Toymaker is a collection of science fiction short stories by Raymond F. Jones. It was first published in 1951 by Fantasy Publishing Company, Inc. in an edition of 1,300 copies of which 1,000 were hardback. The stories originally appeared in the magazines Astounding and Fantastic Adventures.

The Year When Stardust Fell

The Year When Stardust Fell is a science fiction novel written by Raymond F. Jones. It was initially published in 1958 by the John C. Winston Company.

This is one of the thirty-five juvenile novels that comprise the Winston Science Fiction set, which novels were published in the 1950s for a readership of teen-aged boys. The typical protagonist in these books was a boy in his late teens who was proficient in the art of electronics, a hobby that was easily available to the readers. In this story, as in Son of the Stars, the protagonist has a ham radio and a small observatory with a telescope he built himself.

This Island Earth

This Island Earth is a 1955 American science fiction film from Universal International, produced by William Alland, directed by Joseph M. Newman and Jack Arnold, that stars Jeff Morrow, Faith Domergue and Rex Reason. It is based on the eponymous 1952 novel by Raymond F. Jones, which was originally published in the magazine Thrilling Wonder Stories as three related novelettes: "The Alien Machine" in the June 1949 issue, "The Shroud of Secrecy" in December 1949, and "The Greater Conflict" in February 1950. The film was released in 1955 as a double feature with Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy.

Upon initial release, the film was praised by critics, who cited the special effects, well-written script, and eye-popping Technicolor prints as being its major assets. In 1996, it was edited down and lampooned in Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Movie, a spin-off of the popular syndicated movie riffing television series Mystery Science Theater 3000.

This Island Earth (novel)

This Island Earth is a 1952 science fiction novel by American writer Raymond F. Jones. It was first published in Thrilling Wonder Stories magazine as a serialized set of three novelettes by Raymond F. Jones: "The Alien Machine" in the June 1949 issue, "The Shroud of Secrecy" in the December 1949 issue, and "The Greater Conflict" in the February 1950 issue. These three stories were later combined into the novel entitled This Island Earth in 1952. The novel became the basis for the 1955 science fiction film This Island Earth.

The story revolves around a race of aliens who, in recruiting humans for a group called "Peace Engineers", are actually using Earth as a pawn in an intergalactic war. Both the novel and the film contain some intriguing concepts that had not previously been considered by most science fiction of the time, but while the movie starts out in a very similar manner to the novel, it quickly goes its own way.

Winston Science Fiction

Winston Science Fiction was a series of 37 American juvenile science fiction books published by the John C. Winston Company of Philadelphia from 1952 to 1960 and by its successor Holt, Rinehart & Winston in 1960 and 1961. It included 35 novels by various writers, including many who became famous in the SF field, such as Poul Anderson, Arthur C. Clarke, Ben Bova, and Lester del Rey. There was also one anthology, The Year After Tomorrow, edited by del Rey and others. There was one non-fiction book Rockets through Space: The Story of Man's Preparations to Explore the Universe by del Rey which details the factual science and technology of rocket flight. Many of the dust jackets became science fiction classics; the artists included Hugo Award winners Ed Emshwiller and Virgil Finlay along with Hugo nominees such as Mel Hunter and Alex Schomburg.

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