Ray Kremer

Remy Peter "Ray" Kremer (March 23, 1893 – February 8, 1965) was a professional baseball player. He was a pitcher over parts of ten seasons (1924–1933), all with the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Kremer had a remarkable beginning to his big-league career. He posted an 18-10 record as a rookie in 1924, then followed that with seasons of 17-8, 20-6 and 19-8. He was third in the vote for the National League's most valuable player in 1926.

The Pirates won a pair of pennants during that stretch. Kremer threw two complete games in the 1925 World Series against the Washington Senators, and after winning Game 6 with a six-hitter, Kremer was brought back for four innings of relief in Game 7 and ended up the winning pitcher in that game as well. He also made one start in the 1927 World Series, chosen to pitch Game 1 against a New York Yankees team thought by many to be the greatest baseball team of all time.

He led the National League in ERA in both 1926 and 1927.

Kremer put up some of the most impressive numbers of his career in 1930, leading the league in wins (20), games started (38) and innings pitched (276).

For his career, he compiled a 143–85 record in 308 appearances, with a 3.76 ERA and 516 strikeouts. Kremer's 143 wins with Pittsburgh rank him eighth in franchise history, his .627 winning percentage ranks seventh, and his 1,954​23 innings pitched rank tenth.

He was born in Oakland, California, and later died in Pinole, California, at the age of 71.

Ray Kremer
RayKremerbaseballcard
Pitcher
Born: March 23, 1893
Oakland, California
Died: February 8, 1965 (aged 71)
Pinole, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 18, 1924, for the Pittsburgh Pirates
Last MLB appearance
July 1, 1933, for the Pittsburgh Pirates
MLB statistics
Win–loss record143–85
Earned run average3.76
Strikeouts516
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

External links

1893 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1893 throughout the world.

1925 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1925 Pittsburgh Pirates finished first in the National League with a record of 95–58. They defeated the Washington Senators four games to three to win their second World Series championship.

The Pirates had three future Hall of Famers in their starting lineup: Max Carey, Kiki Cuyler, and Pie Traynor.

1925 World Series

In the 1925 World Series, the Pittsburgh Pirates defeated the defending champion Washington Senators in seven games.

In a reversal of fortune on all counts from the previous 1924 World Series, when Washington's Walter Johnson had come back from two losses to win the seventh and deciding game, Johnson dominated in Games 1 and 4, but lost Game 7.

The Senators built up a 3–1 Series lead. After Pittsburgh won the next two games, Johnson again took the mound for Game 7, and carried a 6–4 lead into the bottom of the seventh inning. But errors by shortstop Roger Peckinpaugh in both the seventh and eighth innings led to four unearned runs, and the Pirates become the first team in a best-of-seven Series to overcome a 3–1 Series deficit to win the championship. Peckinpaugh, the Senators' regular shortstop and the 1925 American League Most Valuable Player, had a tough Series in the field, committing a record eight errors.

Playing conditions were of no help. The 1925 Series was postponed twice due to poor weather, and Game 7 was played in what soon became a steady downpour, described as "probably the worst conditions ever for a World Series game." Senators outfielder Goose Goslin reported that the fog prevented him from clearly seeing the infield during the last three innings of the game, and claimed that the Series-winning hit was actually a foul ball. In the next day's The New York Times, James Harrison wrote "In a grave of mud was buried Walter Johnson's ambition to join the select panel of pitchers who have won three victories in one World Series. With mud shackling his ankles and water running down his neck, the grand old man of baseball succumbed to weariness, a sore leg, wretched support and the most miserable weather conditions that ever confronted a pitcher."Twice in Game 7 the visiting Senators held leads of at least three runs over the Pirates but failed to hold them. In fact, after the top of the first inning, Washington led 4-0. Nevertheless, Pittsburgh eventually won the game, scoring three runs in the bottom of the eighth inning to turn a 6-7 deficit into a 9-7 lead. To date, the four-run deficit is the largest ever overcome in the seventh game of the World Series.

A memorable play occurred during the eighth inning of Game 3. The Senators' Sam Rice ran after an Earl Smith line drive hit into right center field. Rice made a diving "catch" into the temporary stands, but did not emerge with the ball for approximately fifteen seconds. The Pirates contested the play, saying a fan probably stuffed the ball into Rice's glove. The call stood and Rice parried questions about the incident for the rest of his life—never explicitly saying whether he had or had not really made the catch. His typical answer (including to Commissioner Landis, who said it was a good answer) was always "The umpire said I caught it." Rice left a sealed letter at the Hall of Fame to be opened after his death. In it, he had written: "At no time did I lose possession of the ball."

Writer Lamont Buchanan wrote, "In 1925, the Senators hopped the Big Train once too often... earning Bucky [Harris] the criticism of many fans and American League head [Ban] Johnson who dispatched an irate wire to the Senators manager." In his telegram, Ban Johnson accused the manager of failing to relieve Walter Johnson "for sentimental reasons." Despite the second-guessing, Harris always said, 'If I had it to do over again, I'd still pitch Johnson.'" Contrary to what Ron Darling claimed, this was Walter Johnson's last World Series. By the time the original Washington Senators next reached the Fall Classic in 1933---their last before they became the Minnesota Twins---Johnson had retired.

1926 Major League Baseball season

The 1926 Major League Baseball season.

1926 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1926 throughout the world.

1927 Major League Baseball season

The 1927 Major League Baseball season began in April 1927 and ended with the World Series in October. No no-hitters were thrown during the season.

The New York Yankees, whose lineup featured Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig, dominated the American League with 110 wins. The Yankees swept the Pittsburgh Pirates in the World Series.

1927 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1927 Pittsburgh Pirates season was a season in American baseball. That year, the Pirates won the National League pennant, which was their second in three years and their last until 1960. The team included five future Hall of Famers: Paul Waner, Lloyd Waner, Pie Traynor, Kiki Cuyler, and 20-year-old rookie Joe Cronin (who played just 12 games).

In the World Series, however, Pittsburgh was no match for the New York Yankees. They were swept in four games.

1927 World Series

In the 1927 World Series, the New York Yankees swept the Pittsburgh Pirates in four games. This was the first sweep of a National League team by an American League team.

That year, the Yankees led the American League in runs scored, hits, triples, home runs, base on balls, batting average, slugging average and on-base percentage. It featured legends Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig at their peaks. The team won a then-league record 110 games, finished with a 19-game lead over second place, and are considered by many to be the greatest team in the history of baseball.

The 1927 Pittsburgh Pirates, with MVP Paul Waner, led the National League in runs, hits, batting average and on-base percentage.

1930 Major League Baseball season

The 1930 Major League Baseball season.

1930 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1930 throughout the world.

1948 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1948 followed the same procedures as 1947.

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from players retired less than 25 years, with provision for a runoff in case of no winner. It elected two people on the first ballot, Herb Pennock and Pie Traynor.

Meanwhile, the

Old Timers Committee, with

jurisdiction over earlier players, met on no schedule and not this year.

Criticism continued that earlier players, as well as managers and other non-playing candidates, were being overlooked.

1958 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1958 followed a system established after the 1956 election. The Baseball Writers Association of America voted by mail to select from recent major league players and elected no one. The BBWAA was voting only in even-number years, with the Veterans Committee meeting only in odd years to consider older major league players as well as managers, umpires, and executives. For the second time the induction ceremonies in Cooperstown were canceled because there was no one to induct.

2003 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 2003 proceeded in keeping with rules enacted in 2001. The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) held an election to select from among recent players. The Veterans Committee held elections both for players who were active no later than 1981 and for non-players (managers, umpires and executives).

The induction ceremonies were held on July 27 in Cooperstown, with Commissioner Bud Selig presiding.

Don Winslow of the Navy (radio program)

Don Winslow of the Navy was an American old-time radio juvenile adventure serial. It was broadcast on the Blue Network from October 19, 1937, until May 26, 1939, and was revived for a second run from October 5, 1942, until January 1, 1943.

Kremer

Kremer is a German, Dutch, and Jewish (Ashkenazic) surname cognate to Kramer.

List of Pittsburgh Pirates Opening Day starting pitchers

The Pittsburgh Pirates are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. They play in the National League Central division. Originally known as the Alleghenys, they played in the American Association from 1882 through 1886, and have played in the National League since 1887. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. The Pirates have used 71 Opening Day starting pitchers since they began to play as a Major League team in 1882. The Pirates have a record of 69 wins and 60 losses in their Opening Day games.The Pirates have played in several different home ball parks. Between 1882 and 1909 they played in two parks called Exposition Park and in Recreation Park. They played in Forbes Field from 1909 to 1970 and Three Rivers Stadium from 1970 to 2000 and they have played in their current stadium, PNC Park, since 2001. They had a record of no wins and one loss in the first Exposition Park, four wins and no losses in Recreation Park and no wins and two losses in the second Exposition Park. They had a record of four wins and two losses at Forbes Field and a record of five wins and eight losses at Three Rivers Stadium. Through 2010, they have a record of two wins and one loss at PNC Park. That gives the Pirates an overall Opening Day record of 15 wins and 14 losses at home. They have a record of 54 wins and 46 losses in Opening Day games on the road.Bob Friend has made the most Opening Day starts for the Pirates, with seven. Babe Adams and Frank Killen each made five Opening Day starts for the Pirates, and Deacon Phillippe, Howie Camnitz, Cy Blanton and Bob Veale each made four Opening Day starts. Ed Morris, Pud Galvin, Wilbur Cooper, Ray Kremer, Rip Sewell, Steve Blass, Dock Ellis, Rick Rhoden, Doug Drabek and Francisco Liriano all made three Opening Day starts for the Pirates. Several Pittsburgh Pirates Opening Day starting pitchers have been elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame, including Galvin, Burleigh Grimes, Waite Hoyt, Jim Bunning, and Bert Blyleven. Bunning was elected as both a United States congressman and senator from Kentucky after retiring from baseball.The Pirates have won nine National League titles, in 1901, 1902, 1903, 1909, 1925, 1927, 1960, 1971 and 1979. They went on to win the World Series in 1909, 1925, 1960, 1971 and 1979 (the modern World Series begin in 1903). Sam Leever was the Pirates Opening Day starting pitcher in 1901, Phillippe was the Opening Day starting pitcher in both 1902 and 1903, Camnitz was the Opening Day starting pitcher in 1909, Emil Yde in 1925, Kremer in 1927, Friend in 1960, Ellis in 1971 and Blyleven in 1979.

Max Surkont

Matthew Constantine Surkont (June 16, 1922 – October 8, 1986) was an American professional baseball pitcher who played from 1949 through 1957 in the Major Leagues. He played for the Chicago White Sox, Boston Braves, Milwaukee Braves, Pittsburgh Pirates, St. Louis Cardinals, and New York Giants. The nickname Max was given to him by his childhood friends.

Pinole, California

Pinole is a city in Contra Costa County, California, United States. The population was 18,390 at the 2010 census.

Steve Swetonic

Stephen Albert Swetonic (August 13, 1903 – April 22, 1974) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball, who played his entire career for the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1929 through 1935. Swetonic batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Mount Pleasant, Pennsylvania.

Swetonic provided a solid support in Pirates' pitching staffs of the early 1930s that included Larry French, Burleigh Grimes, Waite Hoyt, and Ray Kremer. His most productive season came in 1932, when he went 11–6 with a career-high 2.82 ERA and tied for the National League lead with four shutouts. In 1933 he recorded career-numbers in wins (12), starts (21), and innings pitched (164 ⅔ ). His career ended prematurily at the age of 28 because of a chronic sore arm.

Swetonic went to spring training with the Boston Braves in 1934 but did not play in the regular season. In a March 24 game against the Philadelphia Athletics, in St. Petersburg, Florida, he yielded four runs in the first inning.

In March 1935, Swetonic was in spring training with the New York Giants team in Miami Beach, Florida. He tossed the final three innings of an intrasquad game between teams captained by Carl Hubbell and Freddie Fitzsimmons on February 28.In a five-season career, Swetonic posted a 37–36 record with 154 strikeouts and a 3.81 ERA in 595 ⅓ innings. He died in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, at age 70.

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