Ray Buivid

Raymond Vincent Buivid (August 15, 1915 – July 5, 1972) was an American football player who played quarterback in the National Football League (NFL) for the Chicago Bears.

A versatile player, Buivid played quarterback, halfback, and defensive back for the Marquette Golden Avalanche football team. He threw 13 touchdowns his junior year (1935). In 1936, he finished third in the voting for the Heisman Trophy and was a consensus All-American as a halfback, though he completed over 50% of his passes as quarterback as well. Marquette finished 20th in the country, and played in their first ever bowl game, the first Cotton Bowl Classic.[1] They lost 16–6 to TCU led by Sammy Baugh.

Buivid signed with the Chicago Bears on October 11, 1937 after missing the first three games of the season.[2] In the season finale against the cross-town rival Chicago Cardinals, he became the first player to throw five touchdowns in a single game, and also caught one.[3] Despite this performance, he appeared in just six games that season, all behind starting quarterback Bernie Masterson, attempting just 35 passes. The 9–1 Bears won the Western division, and played in the 1937 NFL Championship Game against the Washington Redskins, led by fellow rookie Sammy Baugh (who was drafted after Buivid, despite defeating him in the Cotton Bowl). Buivid was just 3 for 12 passing and 3 for -6 yards rushing with three turnovers, including a muffed punt late in the fourth quarter to seal the defeat.[4]

The next season, he appeared in 11 games but attempted just 48 passes for 295 yards, along with 32 rushes for 65 yards. He retired after just two seasons at age 23 to serve in World War II as a lieutenant in the navy.[5][6]

Ray Buivid
refer to caption
Buivid from the 1937 Hilltop
Position:Quarterback, halfback
Personal information
Born:August 15, 1915
Sheboygan, Wisconsin
Died:July 5, 1972 (aged 56)
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Career information
High school:Port Washington (WI)
College:Marquette
NFL Draft:1937 / Round: 1 / Pick: 3
Career history
Career highlights and awards
  • First quarterback to throw five touchdowns in a game in NFL
  • Third in Heisman Trophy voting (1936)
Career NFL statistics
TDINT:11–4
Yards:500
Passer rating:80.8
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Statistics

Source:[7] Passing Rushing Receiving
Year Age Tm G GS Cmp Att Yds TD Int Rate Rush Yds TD Rec Yds TD
1937 22 CHI 6 0 17 35 205 6 2 82.7 19 24 0 1 4 1
1938 23 CHI 11 6 17 48 295 5 2 74.6 32 65 0 1 8 0
Career 17 6 34 83 500 11 4 80.8 51 89 0 2 12 1

References

  1. ^ "Marquette Hall of Fame". Marquette Official Athletic Site.
  2. ^ "Ray Buivid to Join Bears for Cardinals Game". Chicago Tribune. 12 Oct 1937.
  3. ^ "Bucs QB Jameis Winston ties NFL rookie record with 5 TD passes". ESPN.go.com. November 22, 2015. Retrieved December 3, 2015.
  4. ^ Page, Joseph S. Pro Football Championships Before the Super Bowl: A Year-by-Year History, 1926-1965. McFarland. pp. 41–44. ISBN 9780786457854.
  5. ^ Anton, Todd; Nowlin, Bill. When Football Went to War. Triumph Books. p. 243. ISBN 9781600788451.
  6. ^ "Death Takes All-American". Arizona Republic. July 7, 1972.
  7. ^ "Ray Buivid Stats". Pro-Football-Reference.com.
1935 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1935 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Ten Conference teams chosen by various selectors for the 1935 Big Ten Conference football season.

1936 College Football All-America Team

The 1936 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1936. The nine selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1936 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the United Press (UP), (4) the All-America Board (AAB), (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) Liberty magazine, (7) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (8) the North American Newspaper Alliance (NANA), and (9) the Sporting News (SN).

1936 Marquette Golden Avalanche football team

The 1936 Marquette Golden Avalanche football team was an American footballteam that represented Marquette University as an independent during the 1936 college football season. In its 15th and final season under head coach Frank Murray, the team compiled a 7–2 record (7–1 in the regular season) and outscored opponents by a total of 136 to 60. The team played its home games at Marquette Stadium in Milwaukee.

In the post-season, Marquette played TCU in the inaugural Cotton Bowl Classic, losing to by a 16–6 score. Marquette led, 6–3, in the first quarter, but TCU quarterback Sammy Baugh threw a 55-yard touchdown pass to give TCU the lead.Marquette was led by quarterback Ray Buivid. Buivid finished third in the voting for the 1936 Heisman Trophy and later became the first quarterback to throw five touchdown passes in a National Football League game. Arthur Guepe also starred in the backfield for the 1936 Marquette team. Guepe returned a punt 60 yards in the 1937 Cotton Bowl, the first touchdown in Cotton Bowl history.

1937 Chicago Bears season

The 1937 Chicago Bears season was their 18th regular season completed in the National Football League. The Bears started the season fast, winning their first five games, three of them on the road. After a tie to the Giants and a loss to the Packers, the Bears finished the season strong, winning their last four games. The club was second in scoring offense, behind Green Bay, and led the league in scoring defense.

1938 Chicago Bears season

The 1938 Chicago Bears season was their 19th regular season completed in the National Football League. They finished third in the Western Division and did not make the championship game. The Bears started the season well, winning 4 of their first 5 games. However, two upset losses to the Cleveland Rams, two losses to the Detroit Lions, and a loss to Green Bay prevented the Bears from competing in the West.

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List of Marquette Golden Avalanche in the NFL Draft

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After playing college football at the University of Wisconsin, Farris was an 11th round selection (99th overall pick) of the 1942 NFL Draft by the Green Bay Packers. But before training camp, he enlisted in the United States Coast Guard to serve in World War II. He played 33 regular season games over 3 seasons. In 1946, which was his best season, he had 1 passing touchdown, 2 pass interceptions, 1 reception and 16 receiving yards.

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